Public sector in many parts of Northern Ireland has been unrepresentative of the Protestant community

McSlaggart

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“We need to ensure that those applying for positions are more fully reflective of the population they hope to serve. Sadly, the public sector in many parts of Northern Ireland has been unrepresentative of the Protestant community and this has been particularly acute in the Londonderry and wider North West area.



The fact is people who are highly qualified will leave highly paid jobs to take one at a lower rate requiring less skill to live in the "north west". Gregory needs to focus on the underachievement of sections of the state educational system. The issue is one that runs much deeper than the educational system but an underling culture relating to education. This can and should be addressed by everyone.
 


devonish

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“We need to ensure that those applying for positions are more fully reflective of the population they hope to serve. Sadly, the public sector in many parts of Northern Ireland has been unrepresentative of the Protestant community and this has been particularly acute in the Londonderry and wider North West area.



The fact is people who are highly qualified will leave highly paid jobs to take one at a lower rate requiring less skill to live in the "north west". Gregory needs to focus on the underachievement of sections of the state educational system. The issue is one that runs much deeper than the educational system but an underling culture relating to education. This can and should be addressed by everyone.
I hope that the medical school doesn't end up being another white elephant being promoted by the UU as a status symbol. I can't see it being an attractive option to many from outside the local area.
 

Glenshane4

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“We need to ensure that those applying for positions are more fully reflective of the population they hope to serve. Sadly, the public sector in many parts of Northern Ireland has been unrepresentative of the Protestant community and this has been particularly acute in the Londonderry and wider North West area.
The sly Prod fox notices his own stink first. What proportion of the academics employed by Queens University are Northern Ireland Prods? What proportion are Northern Ireland Catholics? I would also like the same information about the academics employed by the University of Ulster.
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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What proportion of the academics employed by Queens University are Northern Ireland Prods? What proportion are Northern Ireland Catholics? I would also like the same information about the academics employed by the University of Ulster.
Why? Just why? Is it at all relevant to the academic discipline professed?
 

McSlaggart

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The sly Prod fox notices his own stink first. What proportion of the academics employed by Queens University are Northern Ireland Prods? What proportion are Northern Ireland Catholics? I would also like the same information about the academics employed by the University of Ulster.
I do not have the figures that you are asking for. That said the university in "northern Ireland" are becoming increasingly a cold house for unionism. This is in part due to the change in the atmosphere of the place and the need for it to have a "British" feel to keep unionism happy. For unionism an atmosphere of equality is often viewed as a loss.
 

neiphin

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I do not have the figures that you are asking for. That said the university in "northern Ireland" are becoming increasingly a cold house for unionism. This is in part due to the change in the atmosphere of the place and the need for it to have a "British" feel to keep unionism happy. For unionism an atmosphere of equality is often viewed as a loss.
+1
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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I do not have the figures that you are asking for. That said the university in "northern Ireland" are becoming increasingly a cold house for unionism.
I read that to mean the discriminator should be not just denominational but ideological.

I recall that Franz and Edith Kohner, with their two daughters, escaped Czechoslovakia in July 1939 (two dozen of their families died in the Holocaust), arrived in the Six Counties, and found themselves discriminated against as Jews. They then ran the Kindertransport resettlement at Millisle.

I'm imagining an interview (based on an old, old almost-joke):

Well, Frau Kohner, we know you are Jewish — but what we want to know is whether you are a Unionist Jew or a Nationalist one.
 
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McSlaggart

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Well, Frau Kohner, we know you are Jewish — but what we want to know is whether you are a Unionist Jew or a Nationalist one.
I think the assumption is that they would have been a Protestant jew. :)
 
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Glenshane4

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I do not have the figures that you are asking for. That said the university in "northern Ireland" are becoming increasingly a cold house for unionism. This is in part due to the change in the atmosphere of the place and the need for it to have a "British" feel to keep unionism happy. For unionism an atmosphere of equality is often viewed as a loss.
I suspect that most Prods are not comfortable with equality for Catholics. They have been privileged for so many centuries. If most Prods have only a 95% share of the cake, they genuinely feel that they are not getting fair play.
 

all the best

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I suspect that most Prods are not comfortable with equality for Catholics. They have been privileged for so many centuries. If most Prods have only a 95% share of the cake, they genuinely feel that they are not getting fair play.
I would be genuinely interested in how you have managed on only 5% of the cake,as covid is going to shrink the cake any tips on how to get by would be greatly appreciated.
Thanking you in advance.
 

neiphin

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I would be genuinely interested in how you have managed on only 5% of the cake,as covid is going to shrink the cake any tips on how to get by would be greatly appreciated.
Thanking you in advance.
Eat less exercise more
 

Sidewindered

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Ah, good old Londonflegory Campbell

Spends 40 years scaring the shite out of Derry's Prods telling them the Feenyuns are going to eat them all, and actively encouraging Protestants to flee first to the Waterside then over the decades ever further and further away from the city (by amazing coinci-dink encouraging them to move into his own Westminster constituency).

Whines that not enough Prods have jobs in the city.

There is a real problem with educational under-attainment especially in Protestant working-class areas where the educational records are frankly appalling, and it is a real issue that needs seriously tackled otherwise we're going to end up with a permanent Loyalist underclass, and this feeds into the lack of Protestant employment in professional technical and civil service jobs (young educated Prods feck off to Britain and don't come back, the sink estates left behind are unemployable)

But Londonflegory can fnck aff with his grievance politics. He's one of the main reasons why this situation exists in the first place, the fecker.
 

McSlaggart

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I suspect that most Prods are not comfortable with equality for Catholics. They have been privileged for so many centuries. If most Prods have only a 95% share of the cake, they genuinely feel that they are not getting fair play.
I would agree that northern Ireland was very discriminatory in its employing and housing practices. That said often the working class Protestant has been left in a worse place than working class nationalism.
 

McSlaggart

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I read that to mean the discriminator should be not just denominational but ideological.

I recall that Franz and Edith Kohner, with their two daughters, escaped Czechoslovakia in July 1939 (two dozen of their families died in the Holocaust), arrived in the Six Counties, and found themselves discriminated against as Jews. They then ran the Kindertransport resettlement at Millisle.

I'm imagining an interview (based on an old, old almost-joke):

Well, Frau Kohner, we know you are Jewish — but what we want to know is whether you are a Unionist Jew or a Nationalist one.
I think the problem is that many nationalists from places like Tyrone are oblivious of the fine distinction of unionist and nationalist. They grow up dealing with unionists who accept the reality of nationalist culture and accept people do not wear GAA tops to offend anyone. In university unionists who grow up in strongly unionist areas find it quite a cultural shock to meet "Irish" people who grew up in Northern Ireland.
 
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Malcolm Redfellow

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I think the problem is that many nationalists from places like Tyrone are oblivious of the fine distinction of unionist and nationalist.
Now, there's an assertion I like to see amplified. With particular attention to fine.

Not omitting an explanation of where there are places quite like Tyrone.

However, McSlaggart's thrust about educational under-attainment is historically proven, and still valid.

The wider issue is why, and how the public sector may be reduced from its peak (September 2009, not uncoincidentally the depth of 'The Crash') but remains around 30% of all employments, the highest by a long chalk of any UK region. I suspect, too, that proportion must increase as a result of COVID-19. The Quarterly Employment Survey by NISRA (most recent, March 2020, here) should be essential reading if and when 'normal service' can be resumed.

In essence, what the Six Counties' economy needs is a clutch of high-skills, high-value, exporting concerns. The demand for skills feeds into the education sector, and so the rising ship lifts all.
 

McSlaggart

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Not omitting an explanation of where there are places quite like Tyrone.

Championship 2018: The football power rankings
  • 1 Dublin. No surprises here. ...
  • 2 Kerry. This was always going to come down to Kerry and Mayo. ...
  • 3 Mayo. Mayo have lost the last two All-Ireland finals making them the country's second best championship team. ...
  • 4 Tyrone. ...
  • 5 Donegal. ...
  • 6 Monaghan. ...
  • 7 Galway. ...
  • 8 Roscommon.
 

Glenshane4

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I would be genuinely interested in how you have managed on only 5% of the cake, as covid is going to shrink the cake any tips on how to get by would be greatly appreciated. Thanking you in advance.
Over my lifetime, I have managed very, very badly. Things will probably get worse for me and for many other Northern Ireland Catholics.
 

McSlaggart

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Now, there's an assertion I like to see amplified. With particular attention to fine.

Not omitting an explanation of where there are places quite like Tyrone.

However, McSlaggart's thrust about educational under-attainment is historically proven, and still valid.

The wider issue is why, and how the public sector may be reduced from its peak (September 2009, not uncoincidentally the depth of 'The Crash') but remains around 30% of all employments, the highest by a long chalk of any UK region. I suspect, too, that proportion must increase as a result of COVID-19. The Quarterly Employment Survey by NISRA (most recent, March 2020, here) should be essential reading if and when 'normal service' can be resumed.

In essence, what the Six Counties' economy needs is a clutch of high-skills, high-value, exporting concerns. The demand for skills feeds into the education sector, and so the rising ship lifts all.
"
Parts of the civil service will be moved out of London to other English regions, Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove has said.

Speaking to the BBC he said it was "vitally important that decision makers are close to people".

He also said proposals to move the House of Lords to York were "a matter for Parliament".

The Institute for Government estimates that 83,500 out of a total of 430,000 civil servants are London-based.

More civil servants work in the capital than any other part of the UK."


To answer your question on jobs I think you need to look to the "south".

The fact is Northern Ireland was and is a failure in both cultural and economic terms. The fact that the A5 has still not been built is but one tiny aspect of the economic damaged done to the local economy.
 

McSlaggart

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I hope that the medical school doesn't end up being another white elephant being promoted by the UU as a status symbol. I can't see it being an attractive option to many from outside the local area.

WHY ??
 


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