Public sector to avoid budget pay cuts - Lenihan

HarshBuzz

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The Field Marshal

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The public sector don't pay taxes?
The public sector are paid from taxes .

The wage bill is humungous.

The majority of private sector workers dont believe that the public sector is giving anything near value for money.

It is very disappointing therefor to hear from the OP that the the private sector drones are to be screwed further in order to ensure the comfortable
& well paid position of the public sector worker is to remain copper-fastened.

The Irish public service Mandarin class via its evil trade unions once again sticks its boot into the private sector worker
 

Thac0man

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Brian Cowen can and has already taken a pay cut without reference to general public sector wages. He is not restrained in any way by the agreement with public sector unions from taking a further pay cut nor has he said he will not do so.

What is the point in you pretending otherwise?
The only pretence that is being really maintined is that of one sector paid from the coffers of the exchequer is not messing and green grass of the other. One hand washes the other.
 

darkhorse

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Bizarre logic. If someone is laid off from say a factory in Clondalkin, how does that impact on someone still gainfully employed in a factory in Tallaght anymore than it impacts on a public servant also still gainfully employed in Tallaght?
There's no doubt, and it goes without saying, that people who have lost their jobs in this recession are by far and away the biggest losers. However, it is up to all people still in employment, whether public or private, to now shoulder the burden, and shoulder it fairly.
And if someone was working for an employer who was making losses of €20bn every year - how many of their 310,000 staff do you think they would let go?
 

brughahaha

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I'm a teacher and I am €13,500 less well off than 2 years ago - thats a real hit - and yes I am also willing to pay more tax and levies next year if tha tis what is imposed on all workers

jesus H
So you earn 100,000 p.a.
for a 8-9 month year

Guaranteed job for life

You'll retire with a 150,000 tax free lump sum and a pension of 50,000 (thats 50% avove the average industrial wage for your pension!!!)

Aye thats sharing the pain alright:rolleyes: , personally think your overpaid by about 40%
 

The Field Marshal

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What are you on about? How can the axe fall on private sector workers and not on public sector workers at the same time?
Public sector workers are a protected elite.
Generally overpaid for the services they provide.

They account for roughly one out of every five workers in the state.

Their unions control the Irish political establishment.
That is how they have achieved such high wages and exceptional working conditions.

In general,with few exceptions, the Irish public sector has not performed well.

The public service and their trade unions are now untouchable.

----------------------------

Irish public service trade unions are a corrupted and evil body retarding Irish political life & the Irish economy.

--------------
 

Dunlin3

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I have no problem with the normal public sector workers facing no more pay cuts. My wife is one of them! What I have a real problem with is the inflated pensions of former senior public servants. The cowardly shower of wasters in government decided at the last minute to absolve these immoral pensions from cuts in order to get the Croke Parke agreement through. Absolutely spineless when they are going to be cutting frontline services. Then of course there are the outragous pay and conditions for many employees of state owned companies that we all have to pay for also. It's a banana republic.
 

Baron von Biffo

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Bizarre logic. If someone is laid off from say a factory in Clondalkin, how does that impact on someone still gainfully employed in a factory in Tallaght anymore than it impacts on a public servant also still gainfully employed in Tallaght?
There's no doubt, and it goes without saying, that people who have lost their jobs in this recession are by far and away the biggest losers. However, it is up to all people still in employment, whether public or private, to now shoulder the burden, and shoulder it fairly.
Most of us escaped lightly at the last budget because the hit was taken by those on welfare and PS workers. Some people are still foolishly deluding themselves that these groups can keep taking hits while we sail on unaffected. Reality is about to bite.
 

Mission Rock

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And if someone was working for an employer who was making losses of €20bn every year - how many of their 310,000 staff do you think they would let go?
You're not comparing like with like, as you well know.
If a private company was losing €20bn a year, it would simply close, and the 310,000 employees would all lose their jobs. Do you want that to happen? No public schools, hospitals, police force, fire services, water services etc etc etc.
The fact is that if every member of the Irish public sector was to work for free, the state would still be running in deficit.
Another fact is that you will be hard pressed to find anyone in the Irish public sector who doesn't agree that the figure of 310,000 should be reduced. The sector I work in (local authority) has seen overall numbers decline from 36,000 two years ago to 32,000 now. I and my colleagues are mystified that similar reductions in numbers aren't occuring in the public sector as a whole. However, if the reductions aren't occuring, its not the fault of the ordinary workers in the sector, but rather its the fault of our bosses, especially our ultimate bosses in government.
 

jacko

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jesus H
So you earn 100,000 p.a.
for a 8-9 month year

Guaranteed job for life

You'll retire with a 150,000 tax free lump sum and a pension of 50,000 (thats 50% avove the average industrial wage for your pension!!!)

Aye thats sharing the pain alright:rolleyes: , personally think your overpaid by about 40%
actually on €59000 basic these days plus allowances and payments for examinations
 

HarshBuzz

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actually on €59000 basic these days plus allowances and payments for examinations
thanks for sharing your experience jacko

can I ask you the following;
what does your package come to after allowances are factored in?
are you a primary or secondary teacher?
how many years experience?
 

Fir Bolg

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Public sector workers are a protected elite.
Generally overpaid for the services they provide.

They account for roughly one out of every five workers in the state.

Their unions control the Irish political establishment.
That is how they have achieved such high wages and exceptional working conditions.

In general,with few exceptions, the Irish public sector has not performed well.

The public service and their trade unions are now untouchable.
Thanks for your opinion on the public sector but again, how can the government axe fall on the private sector and not the public sector at the same time?
 

jacko

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thanks for sharing your experience jacko

can I ask you the following;
what does your package come to after allowances are factored in?
are you a primary or secondary teacher?
how many years experience?
secondary - for a long time
 

Mission Rock

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Yes, on money that is garnered from taxation. Ironic is'ent is? :rolleyes:
Ultimately, eveyone gets paid from money taken off someone else. Staff in insurance companies get their pay from profit on policies that I pay into. I get paid from taxes that they pay into. They provide a service, I provide a service. As long as both services are provided efficiently, what's the difference?
 

HarshBuzz

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Asparagus

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actually on €59000 basic these days plus allowances and payments for examinations
so two years ago you were on €72,500 basic.
Plus expenses plus allowances plus 4 months holidays a year.

I would nearly halve that i had the chance.
Teachers should get about 45K max.
 


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