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Puerto Rico Referendum, November 6th 2012. US Statehood a Possibility.


ruserious

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With all the drama over the upcoming US Presidential Election, another election, less noticed on the media, will take place the same day which may mean something huge to the US, a new State.

That's right, over in the Carribean, the island of Puerto Rico will go to the ballot boxes to decide their future.
US flag with 51 Stars.


Voters will first be asked whether they want the current territorial status to continue. Regardless of how voters answer that question, they will then be asked to express their preference among the three alternatives to the current status if the first question results in a vote for change: Statehood, complete independence or free association with the US.

Good Article here: JURIST - Hotline: Puerto Rico Status Referendum is Historic

So, if you were in their boots, how would you vote?
What will this mean for the US?


Do you wish to maintain the current political status?

Yes: 746,031 (46.1%)
No: 872,719 (53.9%)

Status options:

Free association with US: 404,945 (33.1%)
Independence: 66,761 (5.5%)
Statehood: 751,264 (61.4%)

Puerto Rico update: Vote for Statehood wins out!!!
 
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DDarcy

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It will be interesting to watch, but I think the outcome will be that they maintain as a Territory. Puerto Rico would be like DC and be solidly Democratic, so the Republican states will ensure that they do not get the votes. Its unfortunate, but that will be the end case of it.
 

seabhcan

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It will be interesting to watch, but I think the outcome will be that they maintain as a Territory. Puerto Rico would be like DC and be solidly Democratic, so the Republican states will ensure that they do not get the votes. Its unfortunate, but that will be the end case of it.
Am I correct that they don't currently pay Federal income tax, but would have to if they were formally a state?
 

The System Works

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It will be interesting to watch, but I think the outcome will be that they maintain as a Territory. Puerto Rico would be like DC and be solidly Democratic, so the Republican states will ensure that they do not get the votes. Its unfortunate, but that will be the end case of it.
Below is a video of Republican Presidents Reagan, Ford and Bush Sr. all endorsing statehood on behalf of the Republican Party of Puerto Rico. Romney also supports statehood.

[video=youtube;E4vVT5WPEtA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4vVT5WPEtA[/video]
 

ruserious

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A poll released by Puerto Rican newspaper El Nuevo Dia backs the professor’s opinion. The poll revealed that the statehood option in the second question is edging out the option for a sovereign free state with a two-point advantage, with 44 percent. However, in the first question, which asks if Puerto Ricans are satisfied with the current status, the “yes” option is winning with 51 percent, against 39 percent that said “no.”
 

DDarcy

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Below is a video of Republican Presidents Reagan, Ford and Bush Sr. all endorsing statehood on behalf of the Republican Party of Puerto Rico. Romney also supports statehood.
But it is not up the president to ratify it. They will have to win over the individual states as well. There is also a problem in that Puerto Rico is a Spanish speaking area. This will not go down well with the core base of Republicans. Romney supports it to try and get votes (plus he really doesn't get a say in the statehood if he was president), but if put forward as a realistic option, I just do not see it happening.

I'll have to check on Federal taxes. For instance DC has to pay federal taxes, join for the possible selection in the armed forces (draft), have Washington DC dictate the money that goes to it and they do not have any representatives in Washington DC.
 

Glaucon

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If Puerto Rico becomes a state, there will be serious questions as to how to handle the Spanish language issue. We could see a push to make English the official language of the U.S.

Most Puerto Ricans cannot speak any English at all, despite it being an official language. It is also a very poor territory.
 

ruserious

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If Puerto Rico becomes a state, there will be serious questions as to how to handle the Spanish language issue. We could see a push to make English the official language of the U.S.

Most Puerto Ricans cannot speak any English at all, despite it being an official language. It is also a very poor territory.
25% poorer than the poorest US State but there is a 50% difference already between the richest State and the Poorest.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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If Puerto Rico becomes a state, there will be serious questions as to how to handle the Spanish language issue. We could see a push to make English the official language of the U.S.

Most Puerto Ricans cannot speak any English at all, despite it being an official language. It is also a very poor territory.
If there is one thing that makes the US as a nation very strong both through a shared common bond and through ease of commerce it is having one shared language. It is a massive advantage to them for labour mobility, branding, packaging, the movie industry, advertising, information sharing and in many many other ways.

Those campaigning to the have Spanish given equal status to English in the US really don't seem to realise the benefits of one single language.

Think about it this way, how many Irish people go to Australia, Canada, or the US ahead of Germany despite the latter being closer and currently having a strong labour market? Language diversity is why the EU will never feel like a single country to a an awful lot of people.
 

seabhcan

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If there is one thing that makes the US as a nation very strong both through a shared common bond and through ease of commerce it is having one shared language. It is a massive advantage to them for labour mobility, branding, packaging, the movie industry, advertising, information sharing and in many many other ways.

Those campaigning to the have Spanish given equal status to English in the US really don't seem to realise the benefits of one single language.

Think about it this way, how many Irish people go to Australia, Canada, or the US ahead of Germany despite the latter being closer and currently having a strong labour market? Language diversity is why the EU will never feel like a single country to a an awful lot of people.
Sure. No country with more than one language works. Just look at those well known basket cases called Switzerland and Canada.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Sure. No country with more than one language works. Just look at those well known basket cases called Switzerland and Canada.
Quebec is a basket case and only for massive social transfers would be miles behind the rest of Canada. Switzerland works but it is only blip on the radar in comparison to the size of the US and culturally the Swiss always had to speak a few languages.

To try and deny that one single language does not lead to massive commercial advantages is just not economic sense. Look at the size of the US movie industry in comparison to the rest of the world for instance.
 

darach

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They would benefit from a vote in Congress and two Senators which may benefit them.
 

Troy_337

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If there is one thing that makes the US as a nation very strong both through a shared common bond and through ease of commerce it is having one shared language. It is a massive advantage to them for labour mobility, branding, packaging, the movie industry, advertising, information sharing and in many many other ways.

Those campaigning to the have Spanish given equal status to English in the US really don't seem to realise the benefits of one single language.

Think about it this way, how many Irish people go to Australia, Canada, or the US ahead of Germany despite the latter being closer and currently having a strong labour market? Language diversity is why the EU will never feel like a single country to a an awful lot of people.
People shouldn't be afraid to learn a second language, it's good for the brain. Children that learn a second language before the age of thirteen do better in maths languages like calculus. All that parallel processing is good for the mind.
 

Glaucon

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If there is one thing that makes the US as a nation very strong both through a shared common bond and through ease of commerce it is having one shared language. It is a massive advantage to them for labour mobility, branding, packaging, the movie industry, advertising, information sharing and in many many other ways.

Those campaigning to the have Spanish given equal status to English in the US really don't seem to realise the benefits of one single language.

Think about it this way, how many Irish people go to Australia, Canada, or the US ahead of Germany despite the latter being closer and currently having a strong labour market? Language diversity is why the EU will never feel like a single country to a an awful lot of people.
There is no causal necessity between having one language and being prosperous. Canada speaks English and French and is as rich, or richer, per capita, than the United States.

Switzerland speaks four or five languages, including English, and is a leading light in Europe, ditto for Luxembourg (French, German and Luxembourgish, a German dialect), etc.

Irish people are atrocious at foreign languages (as well as their own native language) and are deprived of working in much of Western Europe, which is a major disadvantage; it also necessitates our importing immigrants to fill the numerous vacant posts for foreign language speakers that exist.

Quebec is a basket case and only for massive social transfers would be miles behind the rest of Canada.
Quebec is Canada's second biggest economy behind Ontario and a centre for major companies like Bombardier; Montreal is Canada's major IT hub. I'm afraid you're talking nonsense.

And, by the way, French is Quebec's sole official language; or are you implying that everyone should only speak English?

To try and deny that one single language does not lead to massive commercial advantages is just not economic sense. Look at the size of the US movie industry in comparison to the rest of the world for instance.
Look at China's. There are more Mandarin speakers on the planet than anything else. The power of the U.S., or its film industry, is not based on the fact that it speaks one language alone.

The point relating to Puerto Rico is predicated on the fact that there is already unease in the U.S. with the power of Spanish (Miami, for example, is 60 per cent Spanish speaking or more); a monolingual Spanish state being added to the mix could be explosive.
 
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dent

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The last time this came up for debate was during the 90s when Pedro Rosello was Governor and the big Pharma companies made moves to pull out of PR because the tax advantages of being there would have been removed if PR achieved statehood. It was only when that hit home that the PR government backed off. I remember (I was in PR a couple of times for my pharma company around that time) that the US government would have had to invest heavily in PR, to bring their infrastructure up to the same level as other states, due to some US law requiring it to be done.
 
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