Push back push back push back

Gurdiev77

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Apr 25, 2016
Messages
2,610
PUSH BACK
the new phrase/word that covers all of the following:-

Reject
Refute
Deny
Argue
Respond
Refuse
Reject
Repel
Disagree
deny
dismiss
rebuff
refuse
renounce
repudiate
scrap
spurn
turn down


Where does it come from ?
Does it signify Trumpian dumbing down of the media.
Is Kellyanne Conway the progenitor ?
Is it acceptable to use any of the above terms , now that we have this coverall.?
 


gatsbygirl20

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22,551
"Double down" is worse......you heard it everywhere when Trump took office first.

Like "flip-flop"--another banal cliche that crept in from American politics......it means "doing a U turn" or a volte-face, but is a very poor attempt at conveying such meaning.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
39,552
PUSH BACK
the new phrase/word that covers all of the following:-

Reject
Refute
Deny
Argue
Respond
Refuse
Reject
Repel
Disagree
deny
dismiss
rebuff
refuse
renounce
repudiate
scrap
spurn
turn down


Where does it come from ?
Does it signify Trumpian dumbing down of the media.
Is Kellyanne Conway the progenitor ?
Is it acceptable to use any of the above terms , now that we have this coverall.?
It's been in use in business for quite some time.
 

Gurdiev77

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Messages
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"Double down" is worse......you heard it everywhere when Trump took office first.

Like "flip-flop"--another banal cliche that crept in from American politics......it means "doing a U turn" or a volte-face, but is a very poor attempt at conveying such meaning.
and not usually used correctly. Often used to mean 'double our efforts '
DOUBLEDOWN DEFINITION
(in blackjack) double a bet after seeing one's initial cards, with the requirement that one additional card be drawn.
 

silverharp

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push back "against political correctness" is at least a few years old, so pre Trump for sure
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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"Reach out" meaning send someone an email and "for the win" meaning....eh?......nothing, are quite vacuous.
 

redhead

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Messages
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FYI, if you're interested, I first heard it while working for a telco sometime in the early noughties. As a fan of real English, and having worked in the gobbledook end of bizniz for a while, I found it irksome to say the least.

A colleague had dumped a load of work on me and I asked my boss if she could back me up and say that it wasn't my responsibility.

"Push back", she told me.

"What does that mean?" I asked in all innocence.

"Take responsibility, push back, tell them you can't do it."

Great, I thought, I have her approval. So I pushed back and the colleague complained I was uncooperative to said boss who did not back me up.

Ah, so I thought, what it really is is a Get out of Jail card for managers who don't want to manage.

Noted. C'est la bizniz.
 

redhead

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"Reach out" meaning send someone an email and "for the win" meaning....eh?......nothing, are quite vacuous.
Let's run it up the flagpole to where it can do some blue sky thinking on how we can best utilise our human resources so that our user experience sizzles and our clients are well and truly serviced.
 

Deadlock

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Feb 4, 2011
Messages
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"Reach out" meaning send someone an email and "for the win" meaning....eh?......nothing, are quite vacuous.
The first occasion I heard "reach out" was from a much younger cousin who had spent a while working in a US company. Cuz had "reached out to their supervisor for feedback on performance objectives". It had been a while since we'd spoken and quite apart from a WTF is Cuz saying in this curious lingo, was the fact that the cadence of what was said had utterly morphed into a MidAtlantic accent, where not only did the pitch increase as the sentence progressed so the whole thing sounded like a question, but the pitch of each syllable rose as well.

I was still speechless a minute later wondering whether I'd been asked something and wracked trying to figure it out.

Totes.
 
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gatsbygirl20

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Messages
22,551
Probably so. I remember from the 90s, along with giving people a "heads up", "getting our ducks in a row" etc etc.
"Heads up" ( meaning to give a warning)

Now there's one that really, really annoys me.

Suddenly everyone was at it: "Thanks for the heads up"

Why are people so sheep-like that they will mindlessly repeat the cliché du jour?

( I realise that sheep don't actually repeat clichés, but better a mangled metaphor than someone else's banal, hackneyed phrase)
 

Gurdiev77

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Messages
2,610
"Heads up" ( meaning to give a warning)

Now there's one that really, really annoys me.

Suddenly everyone was at it: "Thanks for the heads up"

Why are people so sheep-like that they will mindlessly repeat the cliché du jour?

( I realise that sheep don't actually repeat clichés, but better a mangled metaphor than someone else's banal, hackneyed phrase)
i'm afraid I'll have to push back against that statement....
 


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