Qualifications need to be more internationally recognised

Toasty

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Mar 28, 2011
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I've run into many people over the years, particularly those involved in specific professions, many of them highly experienced, who have problems getting their qualifications and experience recognised when they move to another country. I've seen it in the nautical world, where I used to work and heard first hand accounts of it in other fields. I trained to be a commercial pilot some years ago in the US and had to ditch that ambition when I realised that "converting" my qualifications to European ones was going to be far beyond my financial means. I knew of an aircraft maintenance engineer from the far east with close to 40 years experience and who was highly regarded in his field who ran into the same issues.

When I worked on ships I would hear all sorts of nationalist rhetoric about how that country's engineers or deck officers were the best in the world (The British and Dutch in particular were terrible for that) and those of country X, Y and Z were not up to scratch. Irish crew would often join in with them particularly if it was aimed in a transatlantic direction. Russians were another popular target. Literally making the wildest assumptions about large numbers of people they never met. I refused to join in and play that game and often got the strangest looks for it but I'm glad I stuck to my principles because it is in fact a form of bigotry.

Surely in this increasingly integrated planet we can do much better than this. If there are genuine concerns about standards then sure they need to be addressed but I've been around long enough to smell BS when it's doing the rounds.
 


Alan Alda

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Jun 23, 2011
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Perhaps we could have some kind of World government , capable of solving everything.
If people didnt agree to making everything more convenient , we could simply wipe them out.
Only communist scumbags would disagree.
 

Sync

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Depends what you're doing. If you're a certified dentist/banker/nurse/McDonalds worker/builder then there's lots of chance of getting that job experience and certification recognised. We've an incredibly mobile workforce, hence the brain drain, hence the high level of people that move when the economy dips.
 
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Roberto Jordan

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Technical qualifications are generally the most readily recognized. Ofteem differmces in standards explain absence of such.

It's only a semi related point but What would really test globalization is if legal, financial and other non technical service professionals were more generally aligned globally...the service sector is remarkably resilient against globalization with bational or Supra mayoral barriers to relocation of operations or labor being baked in to systems -rather unsurprisingly given that unlike scientists engineers and medics such regulations are written by the actual industries or professionals in question - or politicians in their pocket.

Even internally within economics these industries are remarkable. My little office space probably costs my employer more in rent than my apartment costs me....there is no reason for downtown to be downtown ,as Connecticut hedge funds have shown, but lo in a world where manufacturers can justify moving factored half way round the world to gain marginal efficiencys manhattan ,London etc still full of relatively junior staff in expensive buildings....it's almost as if the industry in question runs the economy and politics and has an interest in such things as global real Estate....maybe Jamie dimon would have less to cry about if he moved his staff to Stamford or further afield....suck for him and his EVPs though who wouldn't have such nice after work options....but good for shareholders
 
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Sync

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It's trickier for the legal profession in particular because law changes country to country. But it's doable in common law countries, and we're seeing it now as uk lawyers are registering in Dublin with brexit on the horizon.
 

PBP voter

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Sep 18, 2015
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Technical qualifications are generally the most readily recognized. Ofteem differmces in standards explain absence of such.

It's only a semi related point but What would really test globalization is if legal, financial and other non technical service professionals were more generally aligned globally...the service sector is remarkably resilient against globalization with bational or Supra mayoral barriers to relocation of operations or labor being baked in to systems -rather unsurprisingly given that unlike scientists engineers and medics such regulations are written by the actual industries or professionals in question - or politicians in their pocket.

Even internally within economics these industries are remarkable. My little office space probably costs my employer more in rent than my apartment costs me....there is no reason for downtown to be downtown ,as Connecticut hedge funds have shown, but lo in a world where manufacturers can justify moving factored half way round the world to gain marginal efficiencys manhattan ,London etc still full of relatively junior staff in expensive buildings....it's almost as if the industry in question runs the economy and politics and has an interest in such things as global real Estate....maybe Jamie dimon would have less to cry about if he moved his staff to Stamford or further afield....suck for him and his EVPs though who wouldn't have such nice after work options....but good for shareholders
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Accord

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin_Accord

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Accord

Engineers have been smart alright.

:)
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
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I've run into many people over the years, particularly those involved in specific professions, many of them highly experienced, who have problems getting their qualifications and experience recognised when they move to another country. I've seen it in the nautical world, where I used to work and heard first hand accounts of it in other fields. I trained to be a commercial pilot some years ago in the US and had to ditch that ambition when I realised that "converting" my qualifications to European ones was going to be far beyond my financial means. I knew of an aircraft maintenance engineer from the far east with close to 40 years experience and who was highly regarded in his field who ran into the same issues.

When I worked on ships I would hear all sorts of nationalist rhetoric about how that country's engineers or deck officers were the best in the world (The British and Dutch in particular were terrible for that) and those of country X, Y and Z were not up to scratch. Irish crew would often join in with them particularly if it was aimed in a transatlantic direction. Russians were another popular target. Literally making the wildest assumptions about large numbers of people they never met. I refused to join in and play that game and often got the strangest looks for it but I'm glad I stuck to my principles because it is in fact a form of bigotry.

Surely in this increasingly integrated planet we can do much better than this. If there are genuine concerns about standards then sure they need to be addressed but I've been around long enough to smell BS when it's doing the rounds.
Yu see it in the commercial field, where I can send a container of goods anywhere on the planet and now the the equipment at the receiving end will be designed to be able to unload it and that the pallets inside will be acceptable for use with their forklifts etc. There are many many other examples of agreed international standards - generally agreed in order to ease the process of making international trade accessible. There are also agreed international standards in the technical fields of IT, telephony etc. Again, all in place to make the business of making money easier.

There is also the osmosis effect whereby countries wishing to trade with, for example, countries in the EU, have to adopt standards laid down by the EU.

All to make it easier for the movement of finger widgets around the world.

All of this can be done.

Sync correctly points out there may be a local aspect to professions requiring qualifications. This may not strictly be restricted to the legal profession. Medicine has legal aspects which may be country-specific as well. Engineering may have different standards locally as well, for eason of local conditions and availability of materials.

It should be possible, though, to define standard core requirements, with a minimum set of locale-dependent exceptions/variants etc which can be learnt and tested in the minimum time.

Interestingly, a friend of mine who was a barrister in Australia, was brought to Ireland for the Hepatitis case. She'd fought a similar case in Australia. She wasn't recognised by the court, but did her research, sat in court, passed notes and was indirectly involved in the proceedings. She acted as sort of a pseudo-barrister and was paid as a fully qualified barrister.
 


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