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Question for the Irish speakers of Politics.ie


diy01

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It would probably be bad form to post this on the Gaeilge forum as Béarla (as I don't have enough Irish yet) so I'll do it here.

If you had the option of visiting only one village in the Gaeltacht and the purpose of your stay was to speak in Irish with as wide a range of people as possible, which would you choose? In other words, a place where it's least likely that you'll to have to switch to English because the other person/people you're interacting with can't continue due to a lack of fluency. A place where you're most likely to hear young people speaking Irish amongst themselves in everyday life etc...

I've spent time in only one area which is undoubtedly in the Fíor-Ghaeltacht, and two places which have no business being in the Gaeltacht at all these days. Even to a non-Irish speaker like me, the difference was like night and day. In one, Irish was everywhere. In the grocery store, the petrol station, the mechanics shop, the pub and the school yard (kids chatting with their teacher).

In the others...nothing.
 

drbob1972

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sounds like you kinda answered your own question there ;)
 

diy01

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I immediately thought of five places that might fit the bill when I decided to post this, but I don't know which is actually the strongest. I'll answer later, after some more replies (hopefully).
 

bradán feasa

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I'd say Rosmuc also. ach ná dean dearmad ar Rathcairn tá a lán Gaeilge ann agus tá sí an Gaeltacht is cóngaraí le BAC .
 

gaelach

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bradán feasa said:
I'd say Rosmuc also. ach ná dean dearmad ar Rathcairn tá a lán Gaeilge ann agus tá sí an Gaeltacht is cóngaraí le BAC .
No. If you want an English free Gaeltacht, Ratchcairn is not the place.
 

feargach

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newbie12 said:
An Ceathrú Rua or Gaoth Dobhair
Although my personal love is the Kerry gaeltacht, life is conducted in English by all the locals there so probably Ceathrú Rua simply because Ulster Irish is effectively a different language to me. It's as different from Southern Irish as Jamaican street patois is from Westminster English.
 

diy01

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You must be referring to Gaoth Dobhair when you mention Ulster Irish, yes?

Although my personal love is the Kerry gaeltacht, life is conducted in English by all the locals
How do you mean? What about Dún Chaoin, An Fheothanach and Baile an Fheirtéaraigh?

Politics.ie ?!
Well, if there's room here for threads on fantasy football and celebrities, then there's room for a question on Irish in the Culture & Community branch. :)
 

diy01

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I also posted this question over on daltai.com (a forum largely for non-Irish beginners in the language but with some fluent speakers sprinkled in) and the majority also picked An Ceathrú Rua.

Of the places mentioned here, I've only visited Gaoth Dobhair so far. I would've thought somewhere like Oileán Thoraí (Tory Island) would perhaps be an even better choice? More remote? Less tourists?
 
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Slightly of topic but Baile, www.bailegaelach.com, who are attempting to establish new Irish speaking communities in the east of Ireland are still encouraging people to get in contact and to take part in the research. Maybe in the near future people will be able to get a 'fíor-Ghaeltacht; experience a bit closer to home.

http://www.bailegaelach.com/page6/page6.html

BTW, I have always found Ceathrú Thaidhg in Mayo to be a very Irish speaking place.
 
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Anywhere from Indreabhán (Inverin) west as far as Ros Muc Cill Chiaráin etc. My own recommendation though would be Inis Meáin, Inis Oírr in the Aran Islands. Gaoth Dobhair in Donegal would be strong as would the area around Dún Chaoin in Kerry. You`ll find Gaeltacht Irish very difficult compared to standard Irish (book Irish) just be ready for that.


Ádh Mór and remember as Amlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin said: "Is cuma liom más dubh nó geal iad is ionúin liom Clanna Gael."
 

DJP

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I was on holidays in Dún Chaoin for a couple of days a couple of months ago. There are as many people with second-homes living there in the area as there are local people. Hence you mostly hear English during the holidays. A lot of people have second-homes in Gaoth Dobhair as well, but proportionally I think Dún Chaoin has to have the higgest rate.
 

Nedz Newt

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Ros Muc is the real deal.

I know that in SW Kerry (Baile an Sceilig) many people who grew up speaking Irish now switch to English all the time, having been overwhelmed by tourists.
 

Trefor

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Nedz Newt said:
Ros Muc is the real deal.

I know that in SW Kerry (Baile an Sceilig) many people who grew up speaking Irish now switch to English all the time, having been overwhelmed by tourists.
Tourists don't cause people to change the language they use - incomers might, but tourist don't.
 

diy01

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All this talk about the state of Irish in the Kerry Gaeltacht is really unfortunate. If it ends up like the Mayo and Cork Gaeltachtaí (which seem rather weak), then that really only leaves the regions in Galway and Donegal as "strong" areas. At least as strong as a modern gaeltacht can be.

I can see why English would be more prominent during the high tourist season, though.

I immediately thought of five places that might fit the bill when I decided to post this,
Looks like they've all been mentioned.
An Ceathrú Rua, Inis Meáin, Ros Muc, Gaoth Dobhair, Oileán Thoraí.
 

Mushroom

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All this talk about the state of Irish in the Kerry Gaeltacht is really unfortunate. If it ends up like the Mayo and Cork Gaeltachtaí (which seem rather weak), then that really only leaves the regions in Galway and Donegal as "strong" areas. At least as strong as a modern gaeltacht can be.

I can see why English would be more prominent during the high tourist season, though.


Looks like they've all been mentioned.
An Ceathrú Rua, Inis Meáin, Ros Muc, Gaoth Dobhair, Oileán Thoraí.

Have just been browsing through some of the interesting stuff that the CSO published after the 2011 census and I came across this gem!

Have a look at page 28 for starters, as it addresses the subject of this thread, but there's loads of other interesting info. in this document.

Bravo, CSO!
 
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