Racism In the UK and Ireland

Irish-Rationalist

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The European Network Against Racism (ENAR) report indicates that 165 incidents of racism were reported in Ireland in the last six months of 2015, an 11% increase on the first six months of the year when 147 such incidents were seen.

“It is appalling that we find ourselves yet again confirming in statistics what Africans, Travellers, Roma, Muslims, Migrants and Minority Irish already know; that racism is a fact of everyday life,” said Shane O’Curry, director of ENAR Ireland.
Author of the report Dr Lucy Michael of Ulster University:

Given the number of academic and NGO reports on racism in Ireland over the last 20 years, it is outrageous that that state has still not developed any significant response to the problem,” she said. We see ongoing problems both with the recording of racist crimes by An Garda Síochána and communication with victims after reporting, as well as evidence of direct racist discrimination in a range of public services detailed in this report.
There were 165 racist incidents reported in just six months in Ireland

Regrettably, and as we all know, racism is not something idiosyncratic of white people in Western society.

My own personal experience:

1. Was made to wait for a long time (approx 25 mins) for a kebab in an undercrowded Asian owned kebab shop in York, England whilst others (familiar locals) were served immediately, and came and went.

2. In Birmingham - asked an African train worker if the train on the platform was heading to Chester. Was ignored. When I re-asked the question I received a very brusque dismissal in the form of a "yeah-yeah".

3. In Oliver St. John Gogarty's Pub, Dublin, I asked the Asian barman for a pint of Guinness. I was alone, and he inquired "One pint of Guinness?". I replied "yes". When I handed him the money, he snapped it out of my hand, then slammed the change on the counter, making no eye contact.

4. Yesterday in Belfast I was walking down Royal Avenue when a guy of Asian appearance deliberately walked right in front of me, obstructing my path. He then turned his head and looked in the opposite direction when crossing the road, to prevent me from getting a look at him.

5. In the Asda store in Downpatrick (local, N.Ireland), a tall African male walked straight into me from the side as I was looking at products on the shelf. It was quite an impact. When I turned, he proceeded to walk on, making no apology.

There are other examples of similar rude and seemingly hostile behaviour, and I could go on.

Am I being paranoid? Is it just coincidence that the perpetrators of aforementioned behaviour just happened to be Black or Asian? Have I experienced racially motivated rude and aggressive behaviour i.e. racism? Or merely experienced the rude behaviour of people who just coincidentally happened to be Black and Asian?

Could this behaviour be in response to racist behaviour which they may have experienced themselves, and which some social scientists have termed "inverted racism" aka "reverse racism"? If it is racially motivated behaviour, is it not in effect just plain old racism, and just as inexcusable as racism perpetrated by whites?

If a white person was to report behaviour which he/she suspected as being racially motivated, and the perpetrators of that behaviour were non-white, in our politically correct social climate could he/she expect to be taken seriously by law enforcement agencies?
 


McTell

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Am I being paranoid? Is it just coincidence that the perpetrators of aforementioned behaviour just happened to be Black or Asian? Have I experienced racially motivated rude and aggressive behaviour i.e. racism? ...

Let me guess - your hair is red and you have freckled skin?
 

between the bridges

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Translation:
 

Kevin Parlon

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If you think Ireland is racist, you should spend some time in Asia. Or in the middle east. Or Africa. Or South America. In fact, Ireland and the west in general is extremely racist except when compared to pretty much everywhere else on the planet.
 

Kai123

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If you think Ireland is racist, you should spend some time in Asia. Or in the middle east. Or Africa. Or South America. In fact, Ireland and the west in general is extremely racist except when compared to pretty much everywhere else on the planet.
Is this not the definition of whataboutery? Should victims of racism just be told "well its worse in Asia"?
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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when my dermatologist told me to wear Protection Factor 50 sunscreen i thought it was very prejudiced. She would'nt have given the same advice to a black person.
 

Kevin Parlon

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Is this not the definition of whataboutery? Should victims of racism just be told "well its worse in Asia"?
You're quite correct, they shouldn't. At the same time, ambulances should be encouraged to leave the scene of the man with the grazed knee to administer their much needed services at the motorway car pile-up.
 

GabhaDubh

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My own personal experience:

1. Was made to wait for a long time (approx 25 mins) for a kebab in an undercrowded Asian owned kebab shop in York, England whilst others (familiar locals) were served immediately, and came and went.

2. In Birmingham - asked an African train worker if the train on the platform was heading to Chester. Was ignored. When I re-asked the question I received a very brusque dismissal in the form of a "yeah-yeah".

3. In Oliver St. John Gogarty's Pub, Dublin, I asked the Asian barman for a pint of Guinness. I was alone, and he inquired "One pint of Guinness?". I replied "yes". When I handed him the money, he snapped it out of my hand, then slammed the change on the counter, making no eye contact.

4. Yesterday in Belfast I was walking down Royal Avenue when a guy of Asian appearance deliberately walked right in front of me, obstructing my path. He then turned his head and looked in the opposite direction when crossing the road, to prevent me from getting a look at him.

5. In the Asda store in Downpatrick (local, N.Ireland), a tall African male walked straight into me from the side as I was looking at products on the shelf. It was quite an impact. When I turned, he proceeded to walk on, making no apology.
Social scientist have given such actions as you describe the term "Symbolism". This where the "downtrodden" are in a position of power and let it be known.
 

realistic1

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If you think Ireland is racist, you should spend some time in Asia. Or in the middle east. Or Africa. Or South America. In fact, Ireland and the west in general is extremely racist except when compared to pretty much everywhere else on the planet.
My brother is married to an Indian lady and by God she would fall into the category of "Racist" She worked as a Air Hostess and she has a list of Races and creeds she hates, which comes from experiences with dealing with them. Number one on her list is Saudi Arabians, closely followed by Nigerians. Listening to her stories there does seem to be a pattern, but unfortunately she tends to generalise.
 
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Kommunist

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Have you been to many other countries abroad? It's really an Irish thing to say 'sorry' when passing somebody by, or being a little bit more polite. In Budapest people don't do that, or say excuse me, or whatever - neither do they do that in Russia.

In Russia if you're super friendly to strangers they'll be suspicious of you or think you are an idiot. How do you know it's not different in other countries?

IDK, I've had similarly rude Irish people but wouldn't consider them racist, just rude.
 

flavirostris

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My brother is married to an Indian lady and by God she would fall into the category of "Racist" She worked as a Air Hostess and she has a list of Races and creeds she hates which comesfrom experiences with dealing with them. Number one on her list is Saudi Arabians, closely followed by Nigerians. Listening to her stories there does seem to be a pattern, but unfortunately she tends to generalise.
Indian Hindus and Sikhs are extremely anti-muslim. Way more islamophobic than white people.
 

Henry94.

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165 incidents while distressing to those involved doesn't seem like a lot. One racist person with a bit of motivation could cause that many incidents in a month. I witnessed one racist incident in my life. A Roma girl selling the Big Issue was being abused by an Irish man. I bought a copy and stood with her until he slouched away like the craven coward he was.

Since then I have worked and socialised with people from all over the world and there is more animosity between fans of various football teams than there is between races in Ireland.

We probably have more people working full-time on the issue of racism than we have actual racists. It is a time to congratulate ourselves on our remarkable tolerance and respect.
 

blokesbloke

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I am sorry to hear about your negative experience in Birmingham.

You should have complained about the staff member if he was rude towards you and I urge you to do so if it happens again.
 

Catalpast

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I am sorry to hear about your negative experience in Birmingham.

You should have complained about the staff member if he was rude towards you and I urge you to do so if it happens again.
Anytime I was in Birmingham I have always found the Brummies to be a very nice people:D

Well they always had a smile on their face when they were talking to me

- whatever it was they were saying?:confused:

Oh and they love the Immigarnts!
 

belfast1981

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.

My own personal experience:


2. In Birmingham - asked an African train worker if the train on the platform was heading to Chester. Was ignored. When I re-asked the question I received a very brusque dismissal in the form of a "yeah-yeah".
Very similar experience in London recently on the Underground service. We were at one of the bigger tube stations (can't remember which but it was either Kings Cross or Waterloo.

We had came of a train, and with the sheer amount of people, and the badly signposted routes to connecting platforms/floors I approached an African security guard and politely asked him where to go to get to the platform of a certain line. He just blanked me completely after looking at me quite sternly, and truthfully rather intimidatingly . I repeated the question and he just turned away and looked at his phone

Finally got a very sharp and sarky answer when I asked again 'Could you tell me please how to get to (platform whatever) or do I have to ask a supervisor?'
 

Truth.ie

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My Uncles just came back from England and they were disgusted.
"Paddy" this and "Mick" that.

OK, their names are Patrick and Michael, but hey, thats not the f@cking point.
 


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