Rare interview with Oglach Mairead Farrell.

Talk Back

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You'll have to explain this.

I wasn't aware he was a unionist, or in a leadership position.
Not surprised to learn that.

He was in a position of leadership - being head of the so-called "Northern Ireland Civil Service".

He said he would not vote to end England's rule in Ireland, but he would accept the reunification of Ireland.

Hope that helps you to understand.
 


Newrybhoy

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Not surprised to learn that.

He was in a position of leadership - being head of the so-called "Northern Ireland Civil Service".

He said he would not vote to end England's rule in Ireland, but he would accept the reunification of Ireland.

Hope that helps you to understand.
So, he wasn't a unionist leader then and he didn't call for a UI.

Glad we cleared that up.
 

NMunsterman

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So, he wasn't a unionist leader then and he didn't call for a UI.

Glad we cleared that up.
So you're you clearing up something that was not said. :rolleyes:
Jeezuz, the British Tory party publicly dumping on the DUP is really eating some people in the North up so badly that they cannot even read a simple sentence properly.

"Talk Back" didn't say Ken Bloomfield (former Head of the Civil Service in the North) called for a Re-United Ireland.
Read again - slowly - what "Talk Back" said.
 
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Antóin Mac Comháin

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"After 1916 he quit the IRB, believing that the conflict of authority between the IRB military council and Volunteer leadership had sabotaged the rising, and that as republicanism became a mass movement there was no need for a secret organisation." - Brugha, Cathal
"When the Irish delegates returned to Dublin, the word was already out that there was to be no Republic. Some members of the IRA wanted to arrest Collins and Griffith for treason, but Brugha put a stop to that." - Bowyer Bell
None of this would have happened if Dev had arrested the treaty signers in december 1921 when they came down the gangplank. But he didn't, and you'd have to say he was the first traitor to the republic.
All your bluster can't get around his failure to act at the end of 1921. 6 or 8 signatories and staff executed would have been much better than the hundreds who died in the civil war.
Nationalism is what Provisional FF members like Martin McAllister support, albeit from the perspective of former 'armed Republicanism', although not exactly the same, it's quite similar to the strategic position adopted by the old Dublin Guards and the Irish National Army in the 1922-1924 period, before the Irish Republican Brotherhood disbanded.
Antóin - do my eyes deceive me???
Instructions for Sausage-Making at Home

I'm sure a wise wan such as you has heard the analogy about putting the Republican Movement through the sausage-grinder, time and time again? The point being, there is only one logical conclusion to a 51%+ Sectarian headcount in the 6 Counties delivering a United Ireland, which is the type of Patriotic State Plastic Paddies and Fascists like you and McTell aspire to, like your fellow travelers in the Shared Ireland Movement, who have made an early bolt-run for power without a single vote being cast: Shared Ireland

You don't get it - you foreign occupiers never will.

Ireland unfree shall never be at peace!
You're the one that doesn't get it, or else you're dyslexic. The original quote said "Ireland at peace, will never be free." That's the Anglo-sphere phrase you're parroting. Do your eyes deceive you? You don't believe your own propaganda:

The word was out Antóin because the enemy PR machine intentionally let the word out before those in Dublin even knew the fools signed the articles of agreement.
McDermott worked in the Media: Ultimately that means that the British were weaving and controlling the narrative. It takes a special type of stupid to support an alien strategy and policy in support of Irish Independence, so I'm not surprised to see you at the top of the queue.
You are a fool of the highest order, not only because of the fact that you also conflate Nationalism with Republicanism, but you also confuse Sovereignty which is vested in the people, and the people alone, whom in turn you have confused as an ethnic entity, with the governing institutions of the Republic, both civic and armed, whom you have mocked for their having treated of it as a salesman treats any other common commodity in a market place, like some form of abstract equality which can be given and taken, according to the measure of political power garnered by the wise men in their counting houses:

Sinn Fein won 159 seats in the 2014 local election - up from 54 in the 2009 LE. So they lost over 70 in 2019 - SF are still up over 20 seats from 2009.
Sinn Fein policy because SF have to present as tolerant of foreigners. Blame it on the Unionists - just a ploy to reunify our country.

More than one way to skin a cat if you know what I mean ;-)
Antóin - wash your mouth out!
There is no other definition of Irish freedom other than Devlins definition, Commerfords definition, Farrell's definition, Shannons definition and King's definition. The 1916 Proclamation doesn't need to be restated, nor does the Irish claim to National Independence. It doesn't say you can get 1 or a 1,000 seats and apportion Sovereignty to specific families and ethnic demographics accordingly. Apart from that, I have enough wounds of my own. I don't need to live off other peoples.
 
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Dame_Enda

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In the same news Bloomfield just said he is willing accept the reunification of Ireland.

Poor locationally challenged Unionists trapped in Ireland - all your leaders are jumping ship now that they see the end is near.
It does seem than some of the more worldly, bourgeoise Unionists are learning to live with a UI if the people vote for it. They probably have experienced the South and know we are not the 1641 re-enactors Paisley used to make out we were.
 

EnglishObserver

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It does seem than some of the more worldly, bourgeoise Unionists are learning to live with a UI if the people vote for it. They probably have experienced the South and know we are not the 1641 re-enactors Paisley used to make out we were.
Of course there are those of a Protestant background who have moderate thoughts and feelings - but this applies at least as much (if not more) to those in NI of a Catholic background.
 

NMunsterman

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Of course there are those of a Protestant background who have moderate thoughts and feelings - but this applies at least as much (if not more) to those in NI of a Catholic background.

Unionist stakeholders - including the farming, business and industry community - forced the DUP's hand in acknowledging that their livelihoods depend on EU access which is why the DUP admitted that the Irish Border is where it is in the Irish Sea.

Games's up - a Re-United Ireland is inevitable.
 

death or glory

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Unionist stakeholders - including the farming, business and industry community - forced the DUP's hand in acknowledging that their livelihoods depend on EU access which is why the DUP admitted that the Irish Border is where it is in the Irish Sea.

Games's up - a Re-United Ireland is inevitable.
If there was to be a border in the Irish sea then the beef farmers would have their guts for garters because 90% of our beef is exported to the mainland.
100 years and we will still counting in another 100.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Perhaps the description of O'Donovan Rossa is right. But his death, and his burial in Glasnevin, provided the occasion for Pearse's 1915 graveside oration, and that restores the balance in favour of O'D.R. even if he was only a "passive participant" by that stage.

It is unquestionable that British policy sought to turn the 1969 rebellion into inter-communal conflict or "Sectarian Civil War", which the British state aimed to turn to its own advantage, including on the international stage. That was/is the meaning of the fixed, long-term British policy of "Ulsterisation" of the conflict. Nothing has ever really changed there.

The Provisionals were not around when that phase of the conflict started. It was British ex-servicemen who were the main source of trained, disciplined personnel resisting state aggression at that stage. These were generally rather favourable to the British component of the state, and their primary antagonism was towards the Stormont stooges who had been put in place by the sovereign state power.

But reponsibility rests on the sovereign power which created the Six County situation and stage-managed it. Fortunately the Provisionals emerged on the scene within a year or so with their extemporised army (of "terrorists"), and, by putting the sovereign power in focus (instead of the Stormont stooges), effectively defeated Britain's Ulsterisation civil war policy and eventually created at least the possibility of a positive way forward.

They accomplished this despite the political, propaganda, diplomatic, and military resources of the sovereign power which was aided and abetted (for much of the time) by the Irish state. The Six County Catholics, being the ones likely to take the brunt, owe an eternal debt of gratitude to Máiréad Farrell and her fellow-Provisionals. (And, come to think of it, so do the other peoples of these islands who would also have suffered to a much greater extent if the criminal British plan had succeeded.)

No doubt fearless heroism (like O'D.R.'s) has its place somewhere (in a speech like Pearse's, for instance). But first and foremost I salute political intelligence such as Máiréad Farrell's.
1574924330143.png

"When we are old, or those of us who live to be old, we shall tell our grandchildren of the men and women of 1916-2016, and the heroes of '98, and of Christmas 1915 as the second Christmas which saw the Nations of the world go to war for the freedom of the seas, and the last Christmas for which Ireland was to be the gate of the seas, in the keeping of the English. For that is the thing for which men bled in France and Serbia, in Poland and Mesopotamia. The many fought to uphold a tyranny three centuries old, the most arrogant tyranny that there has ever been in the world, and the few fought to break that tyranny. Always it is the many who fight for the evil thing, and the few who fight for the good thing, and always it is the few who win. For God fights with the small battalions. If sometimes it seems otherwise, it is because those who fought against the freedom of the small Nations were guilty of a great infidelity to their best selves, and shrunk in the face of a tremendous duty.

In the last of those glorious years in the history of Europe, heroism came back to the earth, and the people themselves went into battle because to each the old voice that spoke from the soil of the Nations spoke anew, and the tears of the beloved of the blessed martyrs healed the wounds and watered the seeds that would weave through the umbilical cords of the wombs and give birth and the gift of life to a risen people. Each fought for the Motherland. It was policy that moved the Governments, but it was Patriotism that stirred the people. It was good for the world that such things were done. The old heart of the earth needed to be warmed with the red wine of the battlefields. Such august homage was never before offered to God, as the homage of millions of lives given gladly for love of country.

War is a terrible thing, and that was the most terrible of wars, but war is not more terrible than the evils it helps to end. It is not more terrible than the exploitation of the masses by cruel Landlords and Plutocrats, it is not more terrible than the infidelity of the French masses to their old Spiritual ideals, it is not more terrible than the enslavement of the Poles by Russia, than the enslavement of the Jews by Germany, than the enslavement of the Palestinians by Israel, than the enslavement of the Irish by England, What if war had kindled in the slow breasts of English toilers a wrath like the wrath of the French in 1789? What if war brought Ireland and France back to her altars, as sorrow brings back broken men and women to God? If the war does these things, will not the war have been worth while? What if the war set Ireland free?

War is a terrible thing, but war is not an evil thing. It is the things that make war necessary that are evil. The tyrannies that wars break, the lying formulae that wars overthrow, the hypocrisies that wars strip naked, are evil. Many people in Ireland dreaded war and bloodshed because they hadn't known it. Ireland hadn't known the exhilaration of war for years. Yet who can say that she had known the blessings of peace? When war came to Ireland, she welcomed it, as one would welcome the Angel of God. And she won. She seems to have lost, but she has won, for to fight was to win, and a tradition was passed on to the future. What peace she knew, was peace with dishonour. A foul thing, dear only to men of foul breeds. She didn't flinch when she passed through that uproar, she did not faint at the sight of blood. Our people have known the Pax Britannica. Now to our sons and daughters we will bequeath the Peace of the Gael."
 
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death or glory

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1574924330143.png

"When we are old, or those of us who live to be old, we shall tell our grandchildren of the men and women of 1916-2016, and the heroes of '98, and of Christmas 1915 as the second Christmas which saw the Nations of the world go to war for the freedom of the seas, and the last Christmas for which Ireland was to be the gate of the seas, in the keeping of the English. For that is the thing for which men bled in France and Serbia, in Poland and Mesopotamia. The many fought to uphold a tyranny three centuries old, the most arrogant tyranny that there has ever been in the world, and the few fought to break that tyranny. Always it is the many who fight for the evil thing, and the few who fight for the good thing, and always it is the few who win. For God fights with the small battalions. If sometimes it seems otherwise, it is because those who fought against the freedom of the small Nations were guilty of a great infidelity to their best selves, and shrunk in the face of a tremendous duty.

In the last of those glorious years in the history of Europe, heroism came back to the earth, and the people themselves went into battle because to each the old voice that spoke from the soil of the Nations spoke anew, and the tears of the beloved of the blessed martyrs healed the wounds and watered the seeds that would weave through the umbilical cords of the wombs and give birth and the gift of life to a risen people. Each fought for the Motherland. It was policy that moved the Governments, but it was Patriotism that stirred the people. It was good for the world that such things were done. The old heart of the earth needed to be warmed with the red wine of the battlefields. Such august homage was never before offered to God, as the homage of millions of lives given gladly for love of country.

War is a terrible thing, and that was the most terrible of wars, but war is not more terrible than the evils it helps to end. It is not more terrible than the exploitation of the masses by cruel Landlords and Plutocrats, it is not more terrible than the infidelity of the French masses to their old Spiritual ideals, it is not more terrible than the enslavement of the Poles by Russia, than the enslavement of the Jews by Germany, than the enslavement of the Palestinians by Israel, than the enslavement of the Irish by England, What if war had kindled in the slow breasts of English toilers a wrath like the wrath of the French in 1789? What if war brought Ireland and France back to her altars, as sorrow brings back broken men and women to God? If the war does these things, will not the war have been worth while?What if the war set Ireland free?

War is a terrible thing, but war is not an evil thing. It is the things that make war necessary that are evil. The tyrannies that wars break, the lying formulae that wars overthrow, the hypocrisies that wars strip naked, are evil. Many people in Ireland dreaded war and bloodshed because they hadn't known it. Ireland hadn't known the exhilaration of war for years. Yet who can say that she had known the blessings of peace? When war came to Ireland, she welcomed it, as one would welcome the Angel of God. And she won. She seems to have lost, but she has won, for to fight was to win, and a tradition was passed on to the future. What peace she knew, was peace with dishonour. A foul thing, dear only to men of foul breeds. She didn't flinch when she passed through that uproar, she did not faint at the sight of blood. Our people have known the Pax Britannica. Now to our sons and daughters we will bequeath the Peace of the Gael."
Now I understand,
It is Rebs who created the term
"Gallant losers".
 

Super Caley

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1574924330143.png

"When we are old, or those of us who live to be old, we shall tell our grandchildren of the men and women of 1916-2016, and the heroes of '98, and of Christmas 1915 as the second Christmas which saw the Nations of the world go to war for the freedom of the seas, and the last Christmas for which Ireland was to be the gate of the seas, in the keeping of the English. For that is the thing for which men bled in France and Serbia, in Poland and Mesopotamia. The many fought to uphold a tyranny three centuries old, the most arrogant tyranny that there has ever been in the world, and the few fought to break that tyranny. Always it is the many who fight for the evil thing, and the few who fight for the good thing, and always it is the few who win. For God fights with the small battalions. If sometimes it seems otherwise, it is because those who fought against the freedom of the small Nations were guilty of a great infidelity to their best selves, and shrunk in the face of a tremendous duty.

In the last of those glorious years in the history of Europe, heroism came back to the earth, and the people themselves went into battle because to each the old voice that spoke from the soil of the Nations spoke anew, and the tears of the beloved of the blessed martyrs healed the wounds and watered the seeds that would weave through the umbilical cords of the wombs and give birth and the gift of life to a risen people. Each fought for the Motherland. It was policy that moved the Governments, but it was Patriotism that stirred the people. It was good for the world that such things were done. The old heart of the earth needed to be warmed with the red wine of the battlefields. Such august homage was never before offered to God, as the homage of millions of lives given gladly for love of country.

War is a terrible thing, and that was the most terrible of wars, but war is not more terrible than the evils it helps to end. It is not more terrible than the exploitation of the masses by cruel Landlords and Plutocrats, it is not more terrible than the infidelity of the French masses to their old Spiritual ideals, it is not more terrible than the enslavement of the Poles by Russia, than the enslavement of the Jews by Germany, than the enslavement of the Palestinians by Israel, than the enslavement of the Irish by England, What if war had kindled in the slow breasts of English toilers a wrath like the wrath of the French in 1789? What if war brought Ireland and France back to her altars, as sorrow brings back broken men and women to God? If the war does these things, will not the war have been worth while?What if the war set Ireland free?

War is a terrible thing, but war is not an evil thing. It is the things that make war necessary that are evil. The tyrannies that wars break, the lying formulae that wars overthrow, the hypocrisies that wars strip naked, are evil. Many people in Ireland dreaded war and bloodshed because they hadn't known it. Ireland hadn't known the exhilaration of war for years. Yet who can say that she had known the blessings of peace? When war came to Ireland, she welcomed it, as one would welcome the Angel of God. And she won. She seems to have lost, but she has won, for to fight was to win, and a tradition was passed on to the future. What peace she knew, was peace with dishonour. A foul thing, dear only to men of foul breeds. She didn't flinch when she passed through that uproar, she did not faint at the sight of blood. Our people have known the Pax Britannica. Now to our sons and daughters we will bequeath the Peace of the Gael."
What blood-soaked Old testament self serving Nietzschian b*ll*x.

"Such august homage was never before offered to God"
"When war came to Ireland, she welcomed it, as one would welcome the Angel of God"
"The Peace of the Gael"


Seriously?
Your mask is really slipping here,
This reads like something out of the ISIS playbook
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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What blood-soaked Old testament self serving Nietzschian b*ll*x.

"Such august homage was never before offered to God"
"When war came to Ireland, she welcomed it, as one would welcome the Angel of God"
"The Peace of the Gael"


Seriously?
Your mask is really slipping here,
This reads like something out of the ISIS playbook
You're supposed to stamp your feet in disapproval and say that "Connolly was not impressed with the original text and he wrote in the Workers Republic:

"..nor do we think that the old heart of the earth needs to be warmed with red wine of millions of lives. We think anyone who does is a blithering idiot. We are sick of such teaching, and the world is sick of such teaching." - James Connolly, Worker’s Republic, December 1915

Other than that, you're preaching to the converted. Here's a link to the original text: Pearse's Christmas Ghosts, 1915. It was still standard Republican-speak in 1995. When you peel it all back, it's the tradition that the Irish National Party, Fine Gael, Fianna Fáil, Sinn Féin, Republican Sinn Féin, Éirígí, Saoradh, the 32 County Sovereignty Movement and the 1916 Societies all come from. I come from the 1913 tradition, and besides, it was blatantly obvious that it falls somewhere in between parody and satire.
 


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