• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please contact us.

Rationing during WW2 in Ireland any interesting anicdotes?

silverharp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
15,718
I was just wondering what it was like in Ireland during ww2 in terms of food , heat, transport etc. One side of my family were Dubs who mostly worked in Guinness at the time and the other side were typical small farmers. One of my grand uncles worked on the Guinness boat so had various tales about bringing pork etc over and coming back with things like Tea, that town gas was rationed and you could only cook at certain times, officials would check apparently and if the hob was hot outside of these hours they would cut you off.
The other side , trains were very slow because they were burning turf instead of, the bread was some awful black stuff that everyone hated but otherwise they would have been self sufficient so nobody went hungry and some mention of powered eggs but I assume they had they own fresh anyway.




from wiki

Being still largely dependent on Britain for coal, manufactured goods and fuel oils, supplies of these were reduced after the fall of France in mid-1940, causing price inflation and a busy black market. It was said that "the poor are like hunted rats looking for bread", as wheat supplies fell, and that the introduction of full rationing was "seriously belated". Typhus reappeared and the government started planning for famine relief in late 1941. John Betjeman, the British press attaché in Dublin, typically reported "No coal. No petrol. No gas. No electric. No paraffin. Guinness good." In March 1942 the government banned the export of beers, and decided that more wheat should be grown, and less barley. The prospect of a shortage of beer led on to barter deals whereby Britain supplied wheat suitable for making bread flour, and coal, and in return Ireland allowed the export of beers. "These supplies were to keep neutral Ireland afloat during World War II and enable the continuance of Irish neutrality".[28]
 


ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
My grandfather was a young lad during the Emerency but remembers goat farms in Cork City, who were due for export to the UK for butchering and ultimately meat rations.
 

eoghanacht

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2006
Messages
32,410
Nothing about rationing but my grandad did carry a decent sized hobby horse from Mullingar back to Kildare town strapped to his back whilst stationed there during the "Emergency"
 

Dr Pat

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
10,040
I know that my ancestors stocked up on tea at the outbreak of the war; that coffee was drank albeit very reluctantly in some parts of the country; that Lord Haw Haw terrified people by broadcasting that Nazi Germany knew 'every cabbage patch from Cork to Donegal' or some such statement; that bananas, oranges etc only reappeared well after the war ended.
 

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
55,059
My father worked in the Park on the turf depots.



He had an uncle who brought up turf from his bog in Kildare and sold it in Benburb Street.
 

PBP voter

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
9,133
Meat was plentiful. Tourists used to flock to Dublin to sample it.

Jammets restaurant was one of the top places to eat in Europe.

http://arrow.dit.ie/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1014&context=jamres

The war years, with food shortages and rationing in Britain created a tremendous demand of
appetites, which grew as the war progressed with servicemen crossing the border to sample
fine cuisine. Oral evidence for Jammet’s during this period was provided by Frank Farren
who began working as a third year commis chef there in 1945 and qualified as a chef in
1948. He mentions that Jammet’s was considered a tough kitchen to work in, and that the
head chef was Marc Faure from France and the second chef was Armand Hoffman from
Alsace Lorraine. There were about fourteen staff in the kitchen during the mid 1940s, and
the main restaurant could seat around fifty people at a time. Also working there as larder
chef at this time was P.J. Dunne, who later went on to teach in the Dublin College of
Catering, Cathal Brugha Street. Both Faure and Hoffman spent about twenty years each
working in Jammet’s. Earlier chefs include Carl Opperman who worked in Jammet’s prior to
becoming head chef in Jury’s Dame Street and later in the Gresham Hotel when it reopened in 1927.



It was located where the Porterhouse central is now.
 

Eire1976

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2010
Messages
13,764
My grandfather told me that he Country was rife with English spivs selling black market items.
 

stopdoingstuff

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,377
My grandfather told me that he Country was rife with English spivs selling black market items.
I have a dodgy grand uncle who got his start buying and selling on the black market. He made enough to open a legit shop post war and retired with about 4 houses. Thank you, Hitler.
 

Accidental sock

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
4,000
I caught the ferry over to Shelbyville. I needed a new heel for my shoe, so, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on 'em. "Give me five bees for a quarter," you'd say.

Now where were we? Oh yeah: the important thing was I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have white onions because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones.
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
217,847
The Glimmer Man - sounds like a Stephen King novel. Gas and electricity were rationed, so i think they could only be used during certain hours of the day. The Glimmer Man was employed to make checks that the glimmer - the pilot light on the stove- was out during that period, and people would scramble to switch it off if they spotted him. But he would put his hand on the cooker and if he detected any warmth, you could have your power cut off for weeks as a punishment.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
49,728
The Glimmer Man - sounds like a Stephen King novel. Gas and electricity were rationed, so i think they could only be used during certain hours of the day. The Glimmer Man was employed to make checks that the glimmer - the pilot light on the stove- was out during that period, and people would scramble to switch it off if they spotted him. But he would put his hand on the cooker and if he detected any warmth, you could have your power cut off for weeks as a punishment.

I'd say that a man with such power, put his hand on more than cookers
 

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
An inlaw of mine, she was born in England. When she married her Irish husband she came here to live in Dublin in mid 1930's.

But during the war she used to send at great expense provisions like butter to her relatives back in England where rationing was far more draconian than here.

Also her correspondence to and from her relatives was censored, because her family have copies of letters send and letters received and on inspection one can see the documents and the sentences "blacked out".
At a guess the censors on both sides of the Irish Sea were busy!
 

Don Wan

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
Messages
1,467
In New Ross there was a place next to the Tholsel which blended tea before the war. All the tea dust was swept in to a far off corner of the store. The workers would often pee on the dust. Then the war happened and that pile of dust became gold.
 

Se0samh

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
15,929
In New Ross there was a place next to the Tholsel which blended tea before the war. All the tea dust was swept in to a far off corner of the store. The workers would often pee on the dust. Then the war happened and that pile of dust became gold.

What a shower.................:D
 

sgtharper

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2008
Messages
10,740

RasherHash

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
23,720
I caught the ferry over to Shelbyville. I needed a new heel for my shoe, so, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on 'em. "Give me five bees for a quarter," you'd say.

Now where were we? Oh yeah: the important thing was I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have white onions because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones.
I think I remember you, you also had a broom handle rammed up your hole so you could clean up where you did go.

Ah, dem wer de days :)
 

freewillie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2013
Messages
7,295
My grandfather told me that he Country was rife with English spivs selling black market items.
Thankfully no Irish descended to that level.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top