Reading..................... setting the example for kids

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The Physical art of actually reading a book...............

Had dinner with friends with young kids week or so ago, kids just started school, one parent is a teacher.

I have always been a reader basically growing up reading Enid Blyton's various books borrowed from cousins........... read all they had available.
Continued to read in teen years and now read everything from detailed Historys to Politics to Economics to Fiction (particularly Old West in 19th century) to Sports biogpaphies to History.

Got asked do my kids see me reading books................... they do and read lots of books.
Got told that the overwhelming majority of chidlren NEVER see their parents reading a book.

For boys it has an even bigger impact.
If dads don't read books then it sends the message that it is somehow not cool and best avoided.

Spoke to a few friends who admitted never really read books.

So do we as a nation need to get our kids back to the idea of reading and as adults set the example to show we do read books.
 


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The Physical art of actually reading a book...............

Had dinner with friends with young kids week or so ago, kids just started school, one parent is a teacher.

I have always been a reader basically growing up reading Enid Blyton's various books borrowed from cousins........... read all they had available.
Continued to read in teen years and now read everything from detailed Historys to Politics to Economics to Fiction (particularly Old West in 19th century) to Sports biogpaphies to History.

Got asked do my kids see me reading books................... they do and read lots of books.
Got told that the overwhelming majority of chidlren NEVER see their parents reading a book.

For boys it has an even bigger impact.
If dads don't read books then it sends the message that it is somehow not cool and best avoided.

Spoke to a few friends who admitted never really read books.

So do we as a nation need to get our kids back to the idea of reading and as adults set the example to show we do read books.
We need to make reading books an activity which is not unique to males.you might start there.
 

StarryPlough01

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More importantly, imv, do you read to your kids?
 

wombat

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My father once said he never read a book - my mother said she'd never seen him reading one but both of them read to us as kids, I'd be a regular reader, my two sisters are not, I'm not sure how much we are influenced by our parents' reading habits.
 

sic transit

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Girls read, all the stats show they do, issue is boys do NOT.
Boys I know do. I regularly meet families in the library and the visit is clearly a part of their lives. It is a place where kids can make their own choices and there is such a range of material available these days that all of them can find what they want.

However, what it does need is a parent who either has some interest in books or recognises the importance of their kids reading, even if they are not good at it or don't do it themselves very often. At home there needs to be interest in what they are reading and encouraging them to talk about it, which they will do ad nauseum!
 

Truth.ie

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Whatever about books, when was the last time you saw a teenager buying a newspaper?
I used to buy one every day, and being a Belfast Telegraph delivery boy in my early teens, I always had a good read for free everyday.
But when I look at my kids and my nephews and nieces, I've NEVER seen them reading a paper.
 

SayItAintSo

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We need to make reading books an activity which is not unique to males.you might start there.

Its more of a problem that boys do not read or taper off alarmingly in their reading as they move through school. No idea where you got the notion reading books is viewed as an activity unique to males.
 

ergo2

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My parents read from their well-stocked bookshelves, brought us to local library as soon as we could walk. Put us thru second, third level and professional qualifications.

I have done same to best of ability with mine. All now qualified in various professions. Will leave plenty of books after me, if little else.

Next generation so far- approx 8, 3 yrs and 15 months - already reading age appropriate books with gusto. For a time the 8 y.o. was spending all time on one of those tablets, but has moved onto books in the last year.

Huge improvements made in childrens' books, altho the secret five still sail to that mysterious island
 
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sic transit

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Per my point they see their father reading so it is normal to want to do so as well.
Seeing someone do something and being able to do so are two very different things. Reading to them gives them a sense of narrative, structure and some idea what the words sound like, plus there's all that unique time they get with a parent. All round they can see it as a very positive experience, which can help develop that love of reading.
 

Truth.ie

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My parents read from their well-stocked bookshelves, brought us to local library as soon as we could walk. Put us thru second, third level and professional qualifications.

I have done same to best of ability with mine. All now qualified in various professions. Will leave plenty of books after me, if little else.

Next generation - approx 8, 3 and 15 months - already reading age appropriate books with gusto. For a time the 8 y.o. was spending all time on one of those tablets, but has moved onto books in the last year.

Huge improvements made in childrens' books, altho the secret five still sail to that mysterious island
My parents paid 500 quid ( a months salary) in the 80's for the complete Encyclopedia collection, which weighed an absolute tonne.
Now smart ass kids rebuke you in debates with with a click on their mobile phones.
 

StarryPlough01

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Per my point they see their father reading so it is normal to want to do so as well.
My point is that the father reads to his kids / reads to them at bedtime. The kids feel special. This instills a love of reading. My point wasn't that the kids see a distant dad reading books / newspapers by himself in the corner.
 

sic transit

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My parents paid 500 quid ( a months salary) in the 80's for the complete Encyclopedia collection, which weighed an absolute tonne.
Now smart ass kids rebuke you in debates with with a click on their mobile phones.
Ah been called on that myself but they tend to lack the details that old beast delivered and of course the superior recall! :D
 

StarryPlough01

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Whatever about books, when was the last time you saw a teenager buying a newspaper?
I used to buy one every day, and being a Belfast Telegraph delivery boy in my early teens, I always had a good read for free everyday.
But when I look at my kids and my nephews and nieces, I've NEVER seen them reading a paper.
That was a guilt trip for the parents. Mine did the same. I think it was a door to door salesman who sold the 10 encyclopedias to them.
 

Schmetterling

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I read to my kids when they were small, daughter always loved it and would choose the books she wanted herself. My son on the other hand seemed to like having me there sitting next to him in bed but I was never sure he was actually listening to the story at all. The house is, and always has been, full of books and I always have a least a couple on the go at any one time. As adults my daughter reads but not a lot, I've never seen my son with a book since he left college (and not very often even then!). I did everything I could to make reading fun for him when he was small, I used to buy comics and magazines featuring his favourite characters but as often as not would find them again, still in the plastic wrap with just a hole ripped to get the toy out. Reading is an important part of my life and I tried to impart that love to my kids but without much success.
 

ergo2

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Whatever about books, when was the last time you saw a teenager buying a newspaper?
I used to buy one every day, and being a Belfast Telegraph delivery boy in my early teens, I always had a good read for free everyday.
But when I look at my kids and my nephews and nieces, I've NEVER seen them reading a paper.
True. Lack of time and energy with many young couples. Work and children take up the time. Children have to be dropped and picked up from schools and activities. News headlines got from radio or various electronic media. May only get a paper at weekends.

Even on a train journey more likely to see more .people working on laptops rather than reading papers.

Are we the last generation to buy and read at least one quality paper each day?
 

ergo2

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My parents paid 500 quid ( a months salary) in the 80's for the complete Encyclopedia collection, which weighed an absolute tonne.
Now smart ass kids rebuke you in debates with with a click on their mobile phones.
There is a theory that apparently rising tide levels are really caused by the weight of Encyclopaedia and National Geogaphics in various houses
 

Betson

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We need to make reading books an activity which is not unique to males.you might start there.
Can you take the feminist hat off for a second , the main group not reading enough are boys as they see it as a very feminine thing to do. No harm in the OP pointing out this and saying how it is especially important to show boys that reading does not make you a cissy.
 


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