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Recordings of native Irish speakers from Louth, Cavan, Tipp


bradán feasa

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Feb 2, 2007
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Lá Nua provides a link to a very interesting resource which contains recordings of native Irish speakers from Antrim, Clare, Leitrim, Armagh, Cavan, Tyrone, Louth, Roscommon, Tipperary and Sligo. The recordings were made between 1928 and 1931.

Its very sad to think that these voices represent the end of 25 centuries of unbroken native Irish use in their respective counties. What is worse is that it happened so close to our watch.

http://www.nuacht.com/colm/recordings.html

Please post in English
 


pauriceenjack

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The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
 
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905

pauriceenjack said:
The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
You know, whenever I look at those TG4 gael-babes (which is often) that's always the image I get. Peasants.
 

White Horse

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I had a quick listen to some of the snippets.

The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

Why is this?
 

DJP

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White Horse said:
The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

Why is this?
Irish is a very good language for expressing yourself in. When people are speaking Irish naturally about things they are interested in there is more of a "flow" of expression and that sounds more round phonetically.
 

Riadach

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White Horse said:
I had a quick listen to some of the snippets.

The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

Why is this?
One has to understand that the Irish spoken in places like Leitrim, Clare, and mid-Connacht, was less isolated, and hence less insular than the Irish spoken in many of the Gaeltachtaí today. People often mistake Cois Fharraige for the standard Connacht dialect, with which it varied considerably. The fact that these places were economically subsistent and independent from surrounding areas is one of the reasons why Irish survived therein, but it also allowed for stronger dialectal dissimilated from the local more standardised varieties, and the dialects therein tended to become rather exclusive, gated and cryptic to all those who did not belong to those areas.

There are of course Gaeltachtaí alive today, who weren't so gated, indeed, these are the weakest. In areas like Muscraí, An Leitriúch, Túir Mhic Éadaigh, the language is much clearer and easier to understand, and tends not to have such strong dialectal influence.
 

Riadach

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
[quote="White Horse":2yn8devg]The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

Why is this?
Irish is a very good language for expressing yourself in. When people are speaking Irish naturally about things they are interested in there is more of a "flow" of expression and that sounds more round phonetically.[/quote:2yn8devg]

With it's many variations, it's an excellent language to be an individual in. Myles Dillon, while researching Irish on the aran Island, found variences in pronounciation, vocabularly and phrases, not only in different houses, but within different members of the family. Like in German, as can be seen from Cré na Cille, many Irish speakers have their own idiosyncratic phrases which can be used to identify one speaker from another, as was it's function in Máirtín Ó Cadhain's novel. T'anam on diucs, honest engine, abu búna, a ru. mo chúis, etc.
 

18 Brumaire

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pauriceenjack said:
The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
And the peasant future is alive and well............
 

Riadach

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pauriceenjack said:
The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
Should all countries abandon their languages to abandon a peasant past, as you have put it? Or was their something intrinsically 'peasant' about the Irish language, if so would you care to point it out?

Given that the Irish language was brought into peasanthood through no fault of it's own, only that the majority of speakers were peasants at the beginning of the 19th century, should we also abandon all the other cultural associations of these peasant people, given that that too would be leaving a peasant past behind. Should we abandon completely, Irish music, Irish sports, Irish poetry (peasant poetry afterall), or perhaps we should ape our neighbours. Afterall if they are successful, it automatically means they have a better culture than us, doesn't it?
 

pocleary

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pauriceenjack said:
The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
Peasant past he says, are you suggesting that Native irish Kings, Queens and Bards and Druids didnt speak Gaelic but a germanic language we now call English.
do you prefer pidgin english to native Gaelic?
shame on you if you are irish if yer not irish then you are true to form for anglophiles,
 

pocleary

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bradán feasa said:
Why was the Irish segment of my post deleted?
shows the reason why Gaelic declined, on an IRISH hosted and named web site they remove the IRISH language posts,
imagine the host removing english posts on a site called politics. uk
 

bradán feasa

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http://www.nuacht.com/colm/recordings.html

I gcomhar le hAcadamh Ríoga na hÉireann tá taifeadtaí de chainteoirí dúchasacha Gaeilge a rinneadh timpeall na tíre idir 1928 agus 1931 á gcur ar fáil don phobal ar an leathanach seo ag Lá Nua.
Is féidir éisteacht anseo le taifeadtaí a rinne teangeolaí Gearmánach, an Dr Wilhelm Doegen, ar chainteoirí dúchasacha Gaeilge as Aontroim, Doire, Tír Eoghain, An Cabhán, Ard Mhacha, An Lú, Liatroim, Sligeach, Ros Comáin, An Clár agus Tiobraid Árainn
 

An Ghearb

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Re: Recordings of native Irish speakers from Louth, Cavan, T

bradán feasa said:
What is worse is that it happened so close to our watch.
With the possible exception of Clare, none of those areas had the amount of monoglot speakers necessary for the speech community to have been remotely saveable by the time of the Gaeltacht Commission in 1926. The modern Gaeltacht is mapped almost exactly onto the areas with noticeable concentrations -- 20% or more -- of monoglot speakers in 1911 (and these are precisely the areas that had a monoglot majority in 1851, in fact).

We might just be able to keep the language alive in a bilingual Gaeltacht nowadays, but it couldn't happen in the '20s. Louth, Cavan, Sligo, Leitrim, Roscommon, Clare, and Tipp all had official Gaeltacht areas in the early days of the State, but they never had the monoglots that the surviving districts had.
 

RG Cuan

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The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.

Now that statement's just laughable.

The recordings of some of the last speakers of Armagh, Tyrone, Derry, Antrim, Louth etc. are an excellent resource agus comhghairdeas le Lá Nua as iad a chur ar fáil.

More recordings from around the country are available from The Royal Irish Academy and Roinn an Bhéaloidis in UCD.
 

An Ghearb

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How available is 'available'? :) I want them all, and I want them now!!

I've heard stuff from Clare and Tipp from the '60s on ancient tape spools before but I've always wondered if and when they'd ever make the surviving Cumann le Béaloideas recordings available in this electronic age.

I am pleased.
 

RG Cuan

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Aug 22, 2007
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A few years ago i got a CD of most of the recordings from Ulster. Just make an appointment with An tAcadamh Ríoga and go and make a copy!

Ádh mór.
 

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