Referendum on a united Ireland could be won by a simple majority of 50% plus 1

McSlaggart

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Seamus Mallon, the former Social Democratic and Labour party deputy leader and former deputy first minister, said calls for a referendum on Irish unity posed dangers.

Mallon said it would be a “bloody disaster” if any referendum on a united Ireland could be won by a simple majority of 50% plus 1.

In such a scenario, Mallon warned, Ireland would inherit a fearful, recalcitrant large unionist minority on the island.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/10/essential-to-avoid-disaster-of-hard-irish-border-says-tony-blair

He is of course correct. It does raise the issue would Unionism agree to the nature of Northern Ireland changing at say a 40 % nationalist majority to a much closer union with the rest of the Island? We would only get a United Ireland at say 60 % of the vote.
 
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AhNowStop

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referendum on a united Ireland could be won by a simple majority of 50% plus 1


Seamus Mallon, the former Social Democratic and Labour party deputy leader and former deputy first minister, said calls for a referendum on Irish unity posed dangers.

Mallon said it would be a “bloody disaster” if any referendum on a united Ireland could be won by a simple majority of 50% plus 1.

In such a scenario, Mallon warned, Ireland would inherit a fearful, recalcitrant large unionist minority on the island.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/10/essential-to-avoid-disaster-of-hard-irish-border-says-tony-blair

He is of course correct. It does raise the issue would Unionism agree to the nature of Northern Ireland changing at say a 40 % nationalist majority to a much closer union with the rest of the Island? We would only get a United Ireland at say 60 % of the vote.

It sets a dangerous precedent to suggest the 50% + 1 should, all of a sudden & in contradiction to previous agreements, NOT be the deciding level.... Its basically saying to Dissidents and everyone else, that democracy is NOT going to be decisive when applied to the six counties..... Where do you go from there ?
 

tokkie

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Seamus Mallon, the former Social Democratic and Labour party deputy leader and former deputy first minister, said calls for a referendum on Irish unity posed dangers.

Mallon said it would be a “bloody disaster” if any referendum on a united Ireland could be won by a simple majority of 50% plus 1.

In such a scenario, Mallon warned, Ireland would inherit a fearful, recalcitrant large unionist minority on the island.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/10/essential-to-avoid-disaster-of-hard-irish-border-says-tony-blair

He is of course correct. It does raise the issue would Unionism agree to the nature of Northern Ireland changing at say a 40 % nationalist majority to a much closer union with the rest of the Island? We would only get a United Ireland at say 60 % of the vote.
Fake news. When the referendum is passed, we won't be inheriting any Unionist minority. According to their leader they'll all be moving abroad.
 

McSlaggart

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It sets a dangerous precedent to suggest the 50% + 1 should, all of a sudden & in contradiction to previous agreements, NOT be the deciding level.... Its basically saying to Dissidents and everyone else, that democracy is NOT going to be decisive when applied to the six counties..... Where do you go from there ?
I would agree but I though Unionists should be given an opportunity to discuss at what tipping point they think things should be changed. This is their opportunity to consider a softer approach to the issue?
 

AhNowStop

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I would agree but I though Unionists should be given an opportunity to discuss at what tipping point they think things should be changed. This is their opportunity to consider a softer approach to the issue?
Well the top unionist "go-to" man of the moment, wee seamy bwyson reckons about 70% if I remember correctly .. hilarious wee tiny tot that he is :roll: ... I seem to recall him on Talkback spouting such nonsense ..

Personally, I think Brexit & the DUP will mean that when the vote is taken, it will be a lot more than 50%+1.....
 

silverharp

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there is a case for 2/3 or even 3/4 in for something like this
 

GabhaDubh

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Everyone signed on to the GFA, the harsh reality is that high tide of Unionism has passed to late to move the goalposts.
 

Mickeymac

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It sets a dangerous precedent to suggest the 50% + 1 should, all of a sudden & in contradiction to previous agreements, NOT be the deciding level.... Its basically saying to Dissidents and everyone else, that democracy is NOT going to be decisive when applied to the six counties..... Where do you go from there ?



100%, that old fool Mallon must think we all do agreements for fun.
 

between the bridges

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Yawn, ye lot couldn't get a 50+1 vote if yez ride from now to doomsday....
 

Mickeymac

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I would agree but I though Unionists should be given an opportunity to discuss at what tipping point they think things should be changed. This is their opportunity to consider a softer approach to the issue?



Recent dealings with unionists should tell most people what they think of concessions, ffs they and the Brits refuse to even implement past agreements.
 

AhNowStop

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Yawn, ye lot couldn't get a 50+1 vote if yez ride from now to doomsday....
Your Doomsday is approaching fast aul han :lol: ........ At least we know riding the goat wont help :? .. poor OO idiots have "rode the goat" :| into extinction ....
 

vivabrigada

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Yawn, ye lot couldn't get a 50+1 vote if yez ride from now to doomsday....
Typical unionist ostrich's attitude, it isn't going to happen! Lol
The leader of Unionism is fukin off when it does though.
Media Mike knows the craic too.
Carson warned yiz.
The British King warned yiz.
Fer fuk sake, it's now emerged even Ken Maginniss warned yiz.
Yawn away, sleepwalking into a United Ireland should make it easier on you.
 

Mickeymac

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Typical unionist ostrich's attitude, it isn't going to happen! Lol
The leader of Unionism is fukin off when it does though.
Media Mike knows the craic too.
Carson warned yiz.
The British King warned yiz.
Fer fuk sake, it's now emerged even Ken Maginniss warned yiz.
Yawn away, sleepwalking into a United Ireland should make it easier on you.




Hospitals use sedation for such trauma:lol::lol::lol:
 

McSlaggart

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Yawn, ye lot couldn't get a 50+1 vote if yez ride from now to doomsday....
"Milking time at Jim O'Rourke's dairy farm at Cootehill, County Cavan in Ireland. The herd of Holstein Fresian cows produce around 160,000 gallons of milk per year which is processed into powder, butter and ice cream for export.
Milking time at Jim O'Rourke's dairy farm at Cootehill, County Cavan in Ireland. The herd of Holstein Fresian cows produce around 160,000 gallons of milk per year which is processed into powder, butter and ice cream for export.
One in every eight Irish jobs is in agriculture and food processing, or agrifood. Proportionally, that makes the industry as important to Ireland as the car industry is to Germany. In the U.K. province of Northern Ireland, where 1.8 million people live, the agrifood industry accounts for about 70,000 local jobs.

Because of its strong market position in the U.K. - which is the destination for 37 percent of Irish food and drink exports - and highly integrated supply chains across both Ireland and Northern Ireland, farmers' and food processors' jobs are particularly vulnerable to any change in trade and border policy resulting from Brexit.

"One unanswered question that affects every dairy company in Northern Ireland, and indeed in the Republic of Ireland, is the market displacement. What access are we going to have post-March 2019 to those markets we have serviced for many many years?" asked Gabriel D'Arcy, chief executive of dairy cooperative LacPatrick, whose suppliers number more than 1,050 farmers across both the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland.

"It's hard to know exactly, but almost any scenario that we can envisage will be negative," TJ Flanagan, chief executive of the Irish Co-operative Organisation Society (ICOS), told CNBC in Dublin. "We currently import about 800 million litres of milk per annum from the U.K. That's about 100 truck movements every day of the year, from north to south." ICOS represents more than 130 co-ops and livestock marts across Ireland.

No need to defend Irish corporate tax rate: IDA Ireland CEO
3:16 AM ET Tue, 28 Nov 2017 | 03:12
"Dairy farmers in the north depend to a substantial extent on processors and cooperatives in the south, to purchase their milk, because Northern Ireland doesn't have the capacity to process its milk," Flanagan explained. "And southern farmers who are members of cooperatives need Northern Ireland's milk to fill their factories."

The key here is the European Union (EU) customs union, which exempts all member states and select outside territories from paying customs duties on all goods traveling within the union.

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has repeatedly expressed his wish that Northern Ireland remain in the EU customs union, which would maintain the free flow of goods and people between Ireland and the UK.

The Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), meanwhile, which is part of a confidence-and-supply deal supporting the current U.K. government, has been adamant about leaving the customs union, insisting that Northern Ireland not be treated any differently from the rest of the U.K. in any post-Brexit arrangement"

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/30/why-irish-farmers-are-worried-about-brexit.html

[video=youtube;1ebVoE1TNcs]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ebVoE1TNcs[/video]
 

michael-mcivor

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5o% plus one - the only show in town- Seamus Mallon said the GFA was Sunningdale for slow learners- yet the SDLP Slow learners let Sunningdale slip out of their slippery fingers-

Wonder is that the reason the Mallon dissident is going against the GFA again-
 

Newrybhoy

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"Milking time at Jim O'Rourke's dairy farm at Cootehill, County Cavan in Ireland. The herd of Holstein Fresian cows produce around 160,000 gallons of milk per year which is processed into powder, butter and ice cream for export.
Milking time at Jim O'Rourke's dairy farm at Cootehill, County Cavan in Ireland. The herd of Holstein Fresian cows produce around 160,000 gallons of milk per year which is processed into powder, butter and ice cream for export.
One in every eight Irish jobs is in agriculture and food processing, or agrifood. Proportionally, that makes the industry as important to Ireland as the car industry is to Germany. In the U.K. province of Northern Ireland, where 1.8 million people live, the agrifood industry accounts for about 70,000 local jobs.

Because of its strong market position in the U.K. - which is the destination for 37 percent of Irish food and drink exports - and highly integrated supply chains across both Ireland and Northern Ireland, farmers' and food processors' jobs are particularly vulnerable to any change in trade and border policy resulting from Brexit.

"One unanswered question that affects every dairy company in Northern Ireland, and indeed in the Republic of Ireland, is the market displacement. What access are we going to have post-March 2019 to those markets we have serviced for many many years?" asked Gabriel D'Arcy, chief executive of dairy cooperative LacPatrick, whose suppliers number more than 1,050 farmers across both the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland.

"It's hard to know exactly, but almost any scenario that we can envisage will be negative," TJ Flanagan, chief executive of the Irish Co-operative Organisation Society (ICOS), told CNBC in Dublin. "We currently import about 800 million litres of milk per annum from the U.K. That's about 100 truck movements every day of the year, from north to south." ICOS represents more than 130 co-ops and livestock marts across Ireland.

No need to defend Irish corporate tax rate: IDA Ireland CEO
3:16 AM ET Tue, 28 Nov 2017 | 03:12
"Dairy farmers in the north depend to a substantial extent on processors and cooperatives in the south, to purchase their milk, because Northern Ireland doesn't have the capacity to process its milk," Flanagan explained. "And southern farmers who are members of cooperatives need Northern Ireland's milk to fill their factories."

The key here is the European Union (EU) customs union, which exempts all member states and select outside territories from paying customs duties on all goods traveling within the union.

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has repeatedly expressed his wish that Northern Ireland remain in the EU customs union, which would maintain the free flow of goods and people between Ireland and the UK.

The Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), meanwhile, which is part of a confidence-and-supply deal supporting the current U.K. government, has been adamant about leaving the customs union, insisting that Northern Ireland not be treated any differently from the rest of the U.K. in any post-Brexit arrangement"

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/30/why-irish-farmers-are-worried-about-brexit.html

[video=youtube;1ebVoE1TNcs]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ebVoE1TNcs[/video]
Processing plants can be rebuilt.
 


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