Rehn advises against reopening terms of loan

Holy Cow

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Oct 8, 2010
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2,085
This guy is really starting to piss me off. Yes, the Irish showed their weakness by not sticking to their guns over Lisbon, but this is taking the mickey.

An Irish government is fully within its rights to reopen this deal if it wants to. Especially seeing as those that made the deal more or less have no mandate.

Rehn advises against reopening terms of loan - RT News

Will the people of this country every grow a spine and stand up?
 


ruamruam

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Nov 11, 2010
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580
This guy is really starting to piss me off. Yes, the Irish showed their weakness by not sticking to their guns over Lisbon, but this is taking the mickey.

An Irish government is fully within its rights to reopen this deal if it wants to. Especially seeing as those that made the deal more or less have no mandate.

Rehn advises against reopening terms of loan - RT News

Will the people of this country every grow a spine and stand up?
You should have some respect for your lord and master
 
D

Deleted member 17573

This guy is really starting to piss me off. Yes, the Irish showed their weakness by not sticking to their guns over Lisbon, but this is taking the mickey.

An Irish government is fully within its rights to reopen this deal if it wants to. Especially seeing as those that made the deal more or less have no mandate.

Rehn advises against reopening terms of loan - RT News

Will the people of this country every grow a spine and stand up?
We have the same right to re-open the deal as you would have to renegotiate a loan with your bank manager if you had been earning 30k but spending 50k p.a.
 

MPB

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Mr Rehn is deluded if he thinks the Irish taxpayer will agree to his attempt to bailout Private European Banks. He should have stuck with the Greeks or moved on to the Portuguese.

It will now become a cause celebre in this country to default on Bank debt. In fact it is looking very like it will become a source of National pride to bring about the demise of the euro.

It really does,nt matter anyway. The Portuguese and the Spanish have real problems and not problems caused by Irelands Banks. Cruicifying us does nothing to make these problems go away.

The fact is that the real economies with Banking problems are Germany, France and Britain.

Expect the solution of debt forbiveness to arrive when the contagion reaches these behemoths.
 

fizzgig

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Another top tier civil servant telling us what to do. Day in, day out we have the overpaid and overpensioned lecturing us on our duty. I am tired of being told I have to pay other peoples gambling debts and am getting angry enough to commit violence.
 

Squire Allworthy

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'Our position is very clear. The senior debt, not to speak of sovereign debt, should not be and will not be restructured. It is another thing as regards subordinated bondholders.

These decisions of the EU finance ministers are based on the need to avoid any further contagion effect.'

Merry Christmas Rehn and you are going to have a busy new year holding back the contagion.
 

bazlad

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Apr 5, 2008
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Holy Cow said:
This guy is really starting to piss me off. Yes, the Irish showed their weakness by not sticking to their guns over Lisbon, but this is taking the mickey.

An Irish government is fully within its rights to reopen this deal if it wants to. Especially seeing as those that made the deal more or less have no mandate.

Rehn advises against reopening terms of loan - RT News

Will the people of this country every grow a spine and stand up?
He should realise that when he makes a deal with a caretaker government who have a 80% dissatisfaction rating that the first thing the next government will do Is reject it. Go on the opposition you have them foreign bureucrats rattled. How very dare he!
 

factionman

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go to hell Rehn, you and the EU.
 

Casillas

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Aug 11, 2010
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I'm so sick of Rehn;

I don't want to interfere with Irish sovereignty but...

I don't want to interfere with domestic politics but...

Has he ever heard of 'NO COMMENT'
 

reknaw

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Jun 3, 2009
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+1

Isn't it appropriate his name is Ollie as well?

The last Ollie to cause heartache in Ireland also came to steal the ground under our feet to pay off foreign debts.
I'm not so sure you're right about that (the name I mean - I won't argue with the rest). His name isn't Ollie (short for Oliver), but rather Olli, which is short for Olavi. That, in turn, is the Finnish version of the Swedish Olav or Olof.

Maybe it has the same etymology as Oliver, however. Check it out. I have to go out with the dog now - in minus 18!

Anyway, we may not have to deal with Mr. Rehn for very much longer. There will be a general election in Finland in March and things are not looking great in the opinion polls for his (and the Prime Minister's) party Suomen Keskusta, which is approximately the local equivalent of Fianna Fail and sits with it in the grotesquely misnamed Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE) faction in the European Parliament.

The new government could choose a new commissioner.

Incidentally, the party that is soaring in the polls is called Perussuomalaiset (True Finns), who are quite xenophobic, populist and anti-EU. Their charismatic leader is the only Catholic ever elected to the Finnish parliament. As a young man, according to his autobiography, he visited Ireland and the Virgin Mary appeared to him in the cathedral in Killarney and urged him to convert.:roll:

In other words, it's a case of good news and bad news ...:lol::lol:
 

FakeViking

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Jul 26, 2006
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We have the same right to re-open the deal as you would have to renegotiate a loan with your bank manager if you had been earning 30k but spending 50k p.a.
But, wait a minute here, WE are not spending that figure, or anything close. WE put up with pretty basic services from those currently in power, and WE pay hefty tax to have the likes of Battman whisked home from whatever pub he feels like drinking in after cutting public services. WE pay for Her Majesty McAleese's ridiculous salary and expense, WE pay for Cowen's gutless incompetence.
 
D

Deleted member 17573

But, wait a minute here, WE are not spending that figure, or anything close. WE put up with pretty basic services from those currently in power, and WE pay hefty tax to have the likes of Battman whisked home from whatever pub he feels like drinking in after cutting public services. WE pay for Her Majesty McAleese's ridiculous salary and expense, WE pay for Cowen's gutless incompetence.
Yes - but what opens up the huge gap of 20 bn are not the items you mention - it is items such as welfare, PS pay, health etc. Now I have no problem with generous social welfare or a first class health service - but paying our PS the highest rates in Europe, while at the same time hopelessly undertaxing ourselves, is a bit of a bother to me. You are, of course, right that our services left something to be desired but that was, in part at least, a result of under-taxation. So, like it or not, it is a WE issue.
 

Beachcomber

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But, wait a minute here, WE are not spending that figure, or anything close. WE put up with pretty basic services from those currently in power, and WE pay hefty tax to have the likes of Battman whisked home from whatever pub he feels like drinking in after cutting public services. WE pay for Her Majesty McAleese's ridiculous salary and expense, WE pay for Cowen's gutless incompetence.


But you are paying way more than you take in. Ignore the 30 and 50K numbers. You're in the billions. And like the person in that example you have been living beyond your means. That was the point.

The Irish deficit in 2009 was €23.35bn. Now that included €4bn injected into Anglo Irish Bank, but even ignoring that there was still a hefty deficit. The excessive spending may not be going on 'basic services', but the money was still spent.
 

Beachcomber

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Yes - but what opens up the huge gap of 20 bn are not the items you mention - it is items such as welfare, PS pay, health etc. Now I have no problem with generous social welfare or a first class health service - but paying our PS the highest rates in Europe, while at the same time hopelessly undertaxing ourselves, is a bit of a bother to me. You are, of course, right that our services left something to be desired but that was, in part at least, a result of under-taxation. So, like it or not, it is a WE issue.

Exactly. Well said.

People will gripe about the small stuff (government cars) and ignore what caused the problem in the first place.
 


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