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Remembrance Sunday, something we can learn from?


johnny365

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I was watching the BBC earlier and the Rememberance Sunday commemoration at the cenotaph. They were filled with dignity, respect and solidarity. I think we can look to these sort of events as we look towards the centenary of the 1916 rising in less than four years time. We can look at the unity across Britain and beyond in remembering past conflicts. It was a wonderful outpouring of respect from a nation.

Can we come together as a nation in a similar way and maybe use a symbol that could universally remember the rising and not be divisive. I for one hope we do mark 1916 properly and its not hi jacked for other purposes by SF/IRA to legitimise the Provo murder campaign. Many don't like the "Brits" but we have to admit they do know how to put on a brilliant show.
 
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Northtipp

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I was watching the BBC earlier and the Rememberance Sunday commemoration at the cenotaph. They were filled with dignity, respect and solidarity. I think we can look to these sort of events as we look towards the centenary of the 1916 rising in less than four years time. We can look at the unity across Britain and beyond in remembering past conflicts. It was a wonderful outpouring of respect from a nation.

Can we come together as a nation in a similar way and maybe use a symbol that could universally remember the rising and not be . I divisive for one hope we do mark 1916 properly and its not hi jacked for other purposes by SF/IRA to legitimise the Provo murder campaign. Many don't like the "Brits" but we have to admit they do know how to put on a brilliant show.
:)

Brilliant.
 

MariaMcN

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Haha, first you call for unity, solidarity and respect and then in you start laying into 'SF/IRA'!

Hilarious!
 

TommyO'Brien

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The British do stage extremely good ceremonies.

We don't. I remember the 75th anniversary of the Easter Rising ceremony. It was frankly embarrassing - bland, dull, sleep-inducing. A friend of mine was over from the US at the time and watched it with me. His response was simple: "Is that all?"

We have stripped back the presidential inauguration from the visually impressive ceremony it was designed to be to a bland mediocre piece of boredom (and who the hell came up with that hideous chair for the last ceremony? Bin it and bring back the old one!)

We simply don't do ceremony well in this state. We think that making it as bland and forgetful as possible is 'republican'. It isn't. France and the US are republics and they can create stunning and beautiful ceremonies.

The men of 1916 deserve better than the sort of rubbish that the Irish state trots out and regards as ceremonial.
 

former wesleyan

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A better sigh of maturity ( rolls eyes ) would be if the Irish could do a programme like Dads Army, and, like the British, laugh at themselves.
 

Lain2016

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I was watching the BBC earlier and the Rememberance Sunday commemoration at the cenotaph. They were filled with dignity, respect and solidarity. I think we can look to these sort of events as we look towards the centenary of the 1916 rising in less than four years time. We can look at the unity across Britain and beyond in remembering past conflicts. It was a wonderful outpouring of respect from a nation.

Can we come together as a nation in a similar way and maybe use a symbol that could universally remember the rising and not be . I divisive for one hope we do mark 1916 properly and its not hi jacked for other purposes by SF/IRA to legitimise the Provo murder campaign. Many don't like the "Brits" but we have to admit they do know how to put on a brilliant show.
I was acutally thinking something along the same lines.

Not specifically a ceremony but the Easter Lily :shock:

Opponents of the lily cite the fact that it is traditionally an SF fund raising symbol.

I think it may be something that all parties could sell and they would all benefit from the proceeds.

That would popularise the Lily and all parties would have an interest in its promotion :)
 

Mr Aphorisms

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crimesofbrits
I was watching the BBC earlier and the Rememberance Sunday commemoration at the cenotaph. They were filled with dignity, respect and solidarity. I think we can look to these sort of events as we look towards the centenary of the 1916 rising in less than four years time. We can look at the unity across Britain and beyond in remembering past conflicts. It was a wonderful outpouring of respect from a nation.

Can we come together as a nation in a similar way and maybe use a symbol that could universally remember the rising and not be divisive. I for one hope we do mark 1916 properly and its not hi jacked for other purposes by SF/IRA to legitimise the Provo murder campaign. Many don't like the "Brits" but we have to admit they do know how to put on a brilliant show.
How can we have solidarity and commemorate men such as Connolly who had a pathological hatred of the British Monarchy and army? He was right to have it as well.

This is a troll thread, pure and simple. The men of 1916 were not fighting the Mongolians or the Chinese, they were fighting the British. The same British who are torturing an old woman in the North, you castrated idiot.
 

Northtipp

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Stop being a spelling Nazi or in that case a misplaced full stop Nazi!!!
Ach relax Johhny. It was funny and it wasnt a spelling error btw. Im the worst in the world at that stuff. Your anti SF stuff is hilarious though. I see you have the happy stalker in likes with you.
 

Glaucon

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I think he basically said what everyone is thinking.

No one wants to see the people who fought in 1916 linked to the IRA campaign.
Which IRA are you talking about? The first IRA took to the field in 1867, under American leadership.

Regardless, in 1916 Irish rebels in Dublin with no "electoral mandate" fought the British police and army, causing hundreds of civilian deaths.
From 1969 in Belfast and elsewhere, Irish rebels with no "electoral mandate" fought the British army and police, causing hundreds of civilian deaths.

When you get round to explaining the substantive difference between the two, maybe we can start.
 

johnny365

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Oct 21, 2007
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How can we have solidarity and commemorate men such as Connolly who had a pathological hatred of the British Monarchy and army? He was right to have it as well.

This is a troll thread, pure and simple. The men of 1916 were not fighting the Mongolians or the Chinese, they were fighting the British. The same British who are torturing an old woman in the North, you castrated idiot.
Thi is a discussion thread, ive spoken to many and they seem to want Unity for 1916, but there is a huge fear that SF/IRA may try to use the centenary of 1916 to try and legitimise the Provo murder campaign.
 

Northtipp

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Thi is a discussion thread, ive spoken to many and they seem to want Unity for 1916, but there is a huge fear that SF/IRA may try to use the centenary of 1916 to try and legitimise the Provo murder campaign.
Why who have you spoken to?
 

Mr Aphorisms

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crimesofbrits
Which IRA are you talking about? The first IRA took to the field in 1867, under American leadership.

Regardless, in 1916 Irish rebels in Dublin with no "electoral mandate" fought the British police and army, causing hundreds of civilian deaths.
From 1969 in Belfast and elsewhere, Irish rebels with no "electoral mandate" fought the British army and police, causing hundreds of civilian deaths.

When you get round to explaining the substantive difference between the two, maybe we can start.
The campaign of 1969 was far more morally justified then the Rising of 1916. Pearse, Plunkett and MacDonagh had no justification to go to war, compared to the provo's.
 

commonman

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May 29, 2010
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thi is a discussion thread, ive spoken to many and they seem to want unity for 1916, but there is a huge fear that sf/ira may try to use the centenary of 1916 to try and legitimise the provo murder campaign.
They could be in government by then.
 
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