Remove height restriction for Dublin offices.

boldfenianman

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Short and sweet. It is patently absurd that the majority of new office developments in Dublin are less than a quarter the size of new office developments in London. As Dublin is actively engaged in trying to win office type investment away from London what is the point in crippling yourself before you start ? Protect the views ? Give me a break. Either Dublin wants to be a major player or it doesn't. If no then fine. Bad enough not having a metro but to have the cockneys refer to Dublin as Canary Dwarf as they do should surely raise some hackles ? Twenty or thirty 50 storey buildings would do nicely and think of the view as you approach the harbour !
 


razorblade

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I agree totally when Liberty Hall is regarded as high rise then you know how bad things are, plenty of space in the docklands build them there, if they want to attract more multinational companies who are looking to relocate post Brexit highrise is the way to go.
 

boldfenianman

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Not just Multi nationals .Also the State . Plenty of home grown companies too. Also apartment buildings in London are commonly 30-40 storeys I mean high-quality buildings Surely given the housing shortage this must be an option? By the way Razorblade can you picture my vision of coming in on the ferry to Dub and seeing twenty or thirty tall buildings on the horizon? Especially at night. Then I would know we had arrived in the big boys league!
 

Catalpast

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London has the Transport capacity to service these things

- does Dublin.

Under the stringent Fire Safety rules in place now

- what guarantee is there that they can be safely evacuated in an Emergency?
 

tigerben

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i can't see why , city centres should be a mix of offices ,retail and living . High rise are the Answer to this . It seems this and previous governments prefer the spread of commuters towns in to other counties that having a vibrant city centre.
Ireland has alway a problem with poor planning . You'd swear we were the only country in the world with historical buildings.
 

Odyessus

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I agree totally when Liberty Hall is regarded as high rise then you know how bad things are, plenty of space in the docklands build them there, if they want to attract more multinational companies who are looking to relocate post Brexit highrise is the way to go.

I've always suspected that Liberty Hall was only given the go-ahead because it was a union headquarters. I doubt that a commercial office block of a similar height would have received planning permission.
 

Filibuster

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I don't really understand Dublin's attitude to high rise. At this rate, Cork's going to be a lot higher and more like a serious urban centre than Dublin before long.

I mean, yes the Georgian parts of Dublin are quite nice, but a lot of the city's a tumble-down kip or full of really bland low rise, particularly large tracts of the North Inner City.

What exactly is the plan? Never build anything that looks architecturally interesting? Become some kind fossilised 5 story max city with no skyline?

I keep hearing all this stuff about protecting Dublin's skyline. What skyline?! The city doesn't have one. It's flat, low rise and largely characterless sprawl.

Also if it doesn't go up, it will never get the density to be a truly serious urban centre.
 

Catalpast

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i can't see why , city centres should be a mix of offices ,retail and living . High rise are the Answer to this . It seems this and previous governments prefer the spread of commuters towns in to other counties that having a vibrant city centre.
Ireland has alway a problem with poor planning . You'd swear we were the only country in the world with historical buildings.
The plans to develop Tallaght, Clondalkin and Blanchardstown go back to 1963

- it was planned all right
 

GDPR

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The plans to develop Tallaght, Clondalkin and Blanchardstown go back to 1963

- it was planned all right
Yes it was. A version of the sprawling car dependent suburbs of the states

Sent from my SM-A320FL using Tapatalk
 

freewillie

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London has the Transport capacity to service these things

- does Dublin.

Under the stringent Fire Safety rules in place now

- what guarantee is there that they can be safely evacuated in an Emergency?
There are a number of solicitors offices down there so a slow evacuation wouldnt be the worst thing to happen
 

The Field Marshal

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All buildings higher than 10 storeys should be demolished.

High rise destroys people.
High rise destroys the landscape.

High rise benefits the truly greedy greedy developer on the make to pull the maximum yield from his miserable mean postage sized plot of land.

The whole high rise phenomena represents the true ugly face of avaricious American capitalism in its most revolting manifestation.

What posters need to understand is that this form of construction was developed first in Chigao USA to facilitate intensive development on postage stamp sized sites.

That a lovely city like Dublin would ape the greedy Americans and destroy the human scaled urban fabric of their city would be a very great tragedy.
 

Filibuster

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High rise delivers the possibility of running a city without having massive land use, snarled transport and huge energy outlay.

If you want American style, environmentally unsustainable bungalow blitz sprawl off over all the horizons, that’s precisely where Dublin is headed.
 

The Field Marshal

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High rise delivers the possibility of running a city without having massive land use, snarled transport and huge energy outlay.

If you want American style, environmentally unsustainable bungalow blitz sprawl off over all the horizons, that’s precisely where Dublin is headed.
What do you mean by high rise?

Point tower blocks of 10 plus storeys that suck the life and light from everything around them?

The city moderne proposed by the arrogant evil architect le Corbusier , partly responsible for the growth patterns in global suicide.?

Is that the excrement you want built in Dublin?
 

ScoobyDoo

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Short and sweet. It is patently absurd that the majority of new office developments in Dublin are less than a quarter the size of new office developments in London. As Dublin is actively engaged in trying to win office type investment away from London what is the point in crippling yourself before you start ? Protect the views ? Give me a break. Either Dublin wants to be a major player or it doesn't. If no then fine. Bad enough not having a metro but to have the cockneys refer to Dublin as Canary Dwarf as they do should surely raise some hackles ? Twenty or thirty 50 storey buildings would do nicely and think of the view as you approach the harbour !
What's the point of building massive office buildings when there is no transport infrastructure to take workers there or anywhere for the workers to live ?
 

boldfenianman

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Liberty Hall is 20 storeys for flips sake! Plus it is past its sell by. Dublin could be something really special on this island if people could just have a little vision or imagination.
 

boldfenianman

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This is where I hope Mr V the T comes in. I spend a lot of time in London. The transport to airports (all five of them) shames Dublin. Dublin MUST have some kind of rail link to the airport. DART, Heavy, Metro . I don't care. Just something. Mr V is a highly intelligent young man. If I can see it I'm sure he can. Cost of a Dublin Metro. Don't know. Billions I suppose. But it must be done or as someone said recently the city will completely stop. We are attracting inward investment . We are building too low. So , we are building out. So Blanchardstown will one day count as city centre and Athlone will be outer Dublin suburbia? Your choice.
 

Glaucon

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Paris has the Tour Montparnasse, an eyesore on par with the epically awful Liberty Hall. After this, all high rise buildings were limited to La Défense, outside the city limits. This preserves the architecture of the city centre from being ruined by high rise towers.

There's no reason why Dublin couldn't do something similar. The Docklands for one.
 

sic transit

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Paris has the Tour Montparnasse, an eyesore on par with the epically awful Liberty Hall. After this, all high rise buildings were limited to La Défense, outside the city limits. This preserves the architecture of the city centre from being ruined by high rise towers.

There's no reason why Dublin couldn't do something similar. The Docklands for one.
That is actually the plan. 9-10 stories max in the designated central zone and whatever you want elsewhere.
 

Odyessus

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Liberty Hall is 20 storeys for flips sake! Plus it is past its sell by. Dublin could be something really special on this island if people could just have a little vision or imagination.
Liberty Hall has actually only 16 storeys, though SIPTU are looking for permission to replace it with a 22 storey building.
 


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