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Report issued last week by Denis Brosnan and the Local Government Committee


dotski_w_

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It seems that I can't start a new topic in this forum until I have at least 100 posts. Is that correct?

I wanted to start one regarding the Local Gorvernment Committee report that was issued last week. If somebody wants to go and start one for me, that would be great. Or else, if a moderator can adjust my priveleges so that I can start it myself. Many thanks.
can i re-iterate this. If somebody could start a thread on the report issued last week by Denis Brosnan and the Local Government Committee, I would appreiate it. I can't do so as I have not got 100 forum posts (a ridiulous rule). This is perhaps the biggest issue to face the Mid-West region since Ireland gained it's independene and I'm surprised it is not already being disussed here. Thanks.
Oh, go on then!
 

arctic fox

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thanks Dotski!

Firstly, here is the report http://limericklgc.ie/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Limerick-LG-Committee-Report-2-Sept-2010.pdf

It's a pretty thorough assessment of the administrative mess that Limerick and the Mid-West finds itself in, and it offers a clear way out of that mess.

Most of the major problems that Limerick and the wider region has stem from the way it is managed, i.e. various areas are pulling against each other when really the region should be moving forward together. The recommendations of the report, if implemented, will have a drastic positive effect on the well-being of the people and businesses of Clare, Limerick and Tipperary.

Though they may not yet realise it, it is unfortunate for large towns such as Shannon and Nenagh that the report did not go further and call for their inclusion in the wider administrative area changes that the report recommends. But the remit of the report was limited for political reasons rather than practical ones, and so what is proposed is the amalgamation of Limerick City and County Councils, with the part of Limerick City which is currently under the administration of County Clare coming under the new combined authority.
 

Limerick Lad

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Whatever about the merging of Limerick City and County Councils as recommended by Brosnan, the portion about enlarging the Limerick City to include those parts of what are essentially Greater Limerick City such Castletroy, Raheen, Ballycummin, Dooradoyle, Ballysheedy, Rathuard and Castlemungret currently under the control of Limerick County Council along with Shannon Banks and Westbury under the auspices of Clare County Council at present should definitely be implemented.
 

hmmm

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Every report that has probably ever been issued about Limerick has raised this issue. Unfortunately while we have this parochial parish pump setup, no politician wants to or has tackled this.
 

arctic fox

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Every report that has probably ever been issued about Limerick has raised this issue. Unfortunately while we have this parochial parish pump setup, no politician wants to or has tackled this.
The one hope is that John Gormley, who is well aware of the issue, having grown up in Limerick, and who has no political base in Limerick may be able to push it through. While I am not a Green supporter, I think this particular issue can probably only be solved by a Green Minister for the Environment.

I would initially have been in favour of a straight-forward boundary extension. However, Brosnan articulates the downside of this. Basically, you'd get a smaller, weaker county Limerick authority, and still have unbalanced regional development along the new boundary. So, it could actually create a worse situation than we already have. By amalgamating the councils you get the wider Limerick area moving forward with one purpose.
 

stanley

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Whatever about the merging of Limerick City and County Councils as recommended by Brosnan, the portion about enlarging the Limerick City to include those parts of what are essentially Greater Limerick City such Castletroy, Raheen, Ballycummin, Dooradoyle, Ballysheedy, Rathuard and Castlemungret currently under the control of Limerick County Council along with Shannon Banks and Westbury under the auspices of Clare County Council at present should definitely be implemented.

Brosnan's Report should be implemented in full and a truck n trailer driven through all the councils/councillors fifedoms, the joke has gone on too long, Brosnan further says the Region is dying slowly but surely and valuable resources need to be more focused and not duplicated.

There are too many idiot politicians down there just look at that dope, Kiely, who has past through as Mayor and certainly the cream does not float to the top if O'Dea is anything to go on, rather a rat like perjurer swims well in the Shannon, he will do wharever it takes to stop anyone rising even a fellow FF rat.

Brosnan has more brains than the lot of them put together and from his business career has a real feel for the Region and aint dependent on those dopes for his living.
 

Limerick Lad

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The one hope is that John Gormley, who is well aware of the issue, having grown up in Limerick, and who has no political base in Limerick may be able to push it through. While I am not a Green supporter, I think this particular issue can probably only be solved by a Green Minister for the Environment.

I would initially have been in favour of a straight-forward boundary extension. However, Brosnan articulates the downside of this. Basically, you'd get a smaller, weaker county Limerick authority, and still have unbalanced regional development along the new boundary. So, it could actually create a worse situation than we already have. By amalgamating the councils you get the wider Limerick area moving forward with one purpose.
Are there a similar plans to amalgamate the city and county councils of Galway and Waterford or has Limerick alone been singled out for this diminution of its city status.
 

arctic fox

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Are there a similar plans to amalgamate the city and county councils of Galway and Waterford or has Limerick alone been singled out for this diminution of its city status.
Limerick alone, for the moment. Limerick is a particularly special case, because it is an urban area that happens to be on the cusp of three counties. There are three local authorities administrating the urban area of Limerick and they are all pulling against each other for their individual interests rather than for the interests of the entire urban area or the wider region (which includes south-east Clare and North Tipperary). No other county, with the exception of perhaps Waterford is in this situation.

Most of Limerick's and the Mid-West's problems stem from this issue.
 

Limerick Lad

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Limerick alone, for the moment. Limerick is a particularly special case, because it is an urban area that happens to be on the cusp of three counties. There are three local authorities administrating the urban area of Limerick and they are all pulling against each other for their individual interests rather than for the interests of the entire urban area or the wider region (which includes south-east Clare and North Tipperary). No other county, with the exception of perhaps Waterford is in this situation.

Most of Limerick's and the Mid-West's problems stem from this issue.
Few if any of Limerick's and the Mid-West's problems stem from this issue but many of Limerick City Council's problems stem from been starved of income from commercial rates from the retail parks, shopping centres and industrial estates dotted around Limerick City's perimeters but not under their control.
 

arctic fox

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Few if any of Limerick's and the Mid-West's problems stem from this issue but many of Limerick City Council's problems stem from been starved of income from commercial rates from the retail parks, shopping centres and industrial estates dotted around Limerick City's perimeters but not under their control.
That is a gross understatement of the issue, Limerick Lad. Firstly, it's a little bit absurd to seperate the problems facing Limerick and the problems facing the city council. There is a significant overlap. Furthermore, this is not simply about rates, altough that does form part of it. Rates are, however, not the most significant issue. Money is not the problem. The problem is that there is not a single focus, and single policy towards how the region is run. We are not moving forward together. Instead, we are vying against each other.

This has resulted in large suburbs, retail parks and industrial estates being built outside the city boundary with no thought whatsoever to the greater ramifications of doing so. The ramifications are obvious. We have an urban area with low density population that spreads out far and wide, with actually very few people living at the core of that urban area. It is the donut effect. Provision of services such as public transport, sewage, power, water, education, roads, etc., have all become costly, and in many cases these services are not provided to the level that they should be because of the way they population has been so widely dispersed. These are very real issues that effect all Limerick people to a greater or lesser degree. There are of course, regional knock-on effects.

Further to this, and equally damaging, is that Limerick City is a statistical anomaly because of the way it is divided up. There is a negative perception nationally of Limerick because much of the national media headlines about the city (highest crime rate, highest divorce rate, highest teenage pregnancy rate, highest single-parent family rate) refer to the core area (where the problems do exist) but do not take into account the outlying suburbs, which if included would bring many of those stats down, to below the national averages in many cases. There is a negative feedback situation, therefore, where the image of the whole of Limerick suffers. The knock-on effect is that people are less inclined to come to the city, businesses less inclined to set up here, tourists less inclined to visit, etc.

A good example of the above 'negative feedback' issue is the difficulty that the University of Limerick has in attracting students to it because there is a perception nationally that Limerick is either a dangerous place or not a nice place to live. The truth is of course the opposite when you realise that UL is situated in one of the safer and more pleasant places of the country. So, the points for courses in UL tend to be lower than for similar, even inferior courses elsewhere, and the quality of student attending the university drops. That's just one example of how the current situation effects a major regional institution in a very real and damaging way.
 

Limerick Lad

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That is a gross understatement of the issue, Limerick Lad. Firstly, it's a little bit absurd to seperate the problems facing Limerick and the problems facing the city council. There is a significant overlap. Furthermore, this is not simply about rates, altough that does form part of it. Rates are, however, not the most significant issue. Money is not the problem. The problem is that there is not a single focus, and single policy towards how the region is run. We are not moving forward together. Instead, we are vying against each other.

This has resulted in large suburbs, retail parks and industrial estates being built outside the city boundary with no thought whatsoever to the greater ramifications of doing so. The ramifications are obvious. We have an urban area with low density population that spreads out far and wide, with actually very few people living at the core of that urban area. It is the donut effect. Issues such as public transport, provision of services, education, roads, etc., have all become costly, and in many cases these services are not provided to the level that they should be because of the way they population has been dispersed. These are very real issues that effect all Limerick people to a greater or lesser degree. There are of course, regional knock-on effects.

Further to this, and equally damaging, is that Limerick City is a statistical anomaly because of the way it is divided up. There is a negative perception nationally of Limerick because much of the national media headlines about the city (highest crime rate, highest divorce rate, highest teenage pregnancy rate, highest single-parent family rate) refer to the core area (where the problems do exist) but do not take into account the wider suburbs, which if included would bring many of those stats down. There is a negative feedback situation, therefore, where the image of the whole of Limerick suffers. The knock-on effect is that people are less inclined to come to the city, businesses less inclined to set up here, tourists less inclined to visit, etc.

A good example of the above 'negative feedback' issue is the difficulty that the University of Limerick has in attracting students to it because there is a perception nationally that Limerick is either a dangerous place or not a nice place to live. The truth is of course the opposite when you realise that UL is situated in one of the safer and more pleasant places of the country. So, the points for courses in UL tend to be lower than for similar, even inferior courses elsewhere, and the quality of student attending the university drops. That's just one example of how the current situation effects a major regional institution in a very real and damaging way.
Most of the problems you describe relating to urban sprawl, etc. all stem from the fact that as the city grew Limerick City Council hadn't control of its suburbs in the main and had no say in how those same suburbs, retail parks and industrial estates which sprang up outside the city boundary were developed or planed
As urban centres go Greater Limerick City is quite contiguous and like most cities it has social and crime problems, probably not much worse than most but unfortunately Limerick continues to get a bad reputation in the national media mainly through lazy journalism.
A revitalised city expanded to include those mainly prosperous and socially cohesive suburbs is what the Mid-West needs more than anything but any plan which includes the scraping of Limerick's city status by the loss of its city council can not be good for Limerick City and could only lead to its dimunation as the third city of Ireland.
 

arctic fox

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But what caused the urban sprawl? It didn't just appear. It was a result of each of the three local authorities that adminster Limerick going it alone vis a vis the planning of their little sections of the wider area.

The bad reputation of the city is caused by lazy journalism, but that is a simplification of the problem. The fact that the stats that are published pertaining to Limerick City are misrepresentative because of the boundary issue does not help the journalists. No other city in Ireland suffers from this statistical anomaly.

The city is not going to lose it's council? What gave you that idea? The city will be promoted to third largest city in Ireland (currently fourth), and the authority will represent a population of approximately 190,000 people. If anything it substantially promotes the status of Limerick.

Here's an article I found earlier today in the Limerick Event Guide, which was written by local city councillor, Diarmuid Scully (Fine Gael). Let me say that I am not Diarmuid Scully (nor do I know him, and I've never met him), and I don't support Fine Gael, but in this piece he articulates well the issue.


"The Limerick Boundary Committee make their report on
the City/County boundary issue public this month. We
hand the Talking Point over to this issues feature writer, City
Councillor Diarmuid Scully, to discuss……

Later this month the report to John Gormley from the Limerick boundary
committee will be made public. While often presented as a pointless squabble
between local politicians, the issue of the boundary is the single most
important one affecting our city and the decision that the Minister makes will
have enormous implications in terms of jobs, investment and the quality of
all our lives.

The current truncated boundary does immense damage to our city. Half the
population of Limerick city (55,000 out of 110,000) officially live in county
Limerick. This false representation of reality damages our city in three ways:

1 Resources: The full financial resources of the city are not available
to be spent in the city. Every year Limerick County Council takes some €8
million more from the suburbs of the city then it spends there. This money
from the ratepayers of the greater city is used to provide services elsewhere
in rural county Limerick. The net effect of this annual transfer of funds from
urban to rural Limerick is that Limerick County Council is now the richest local
authority in the country, while Limerick city council is the second poorest
(after Donegal). We can see the ill effects of this annual plundering of the
city in our pot-holed roads and footpaths, in our dilapidated housing stock
and in the empty shops on our main city streets.

2 Social dumping: Limerick County Council provides no social
housing in its half of Limerick city. It provides no assistance to the homeless
and no public sports facilities of any kind. By refusing to accept its
responsibilities the county council has engineered a situation where all of the
socially disadvantaged areas in a city of 110,000 are concentrated in a small
geographic area. As a result Limerick is now the most socially divided city
in Ireland.

3 Image: Limerick is a city of 110,000 people. We are the 3rd largest
city in the state. Everyone who lives here knows that, yet every guide to
Ireland from the national census, to Lonely Planet to the CIA factbook claims
that Limerick’s real population is just 55,000 and that we are the 4th largest
city in the state.

Limerick has the youngest population of any city in Ireland and has a higher
proportion of its population in fulltime third level education than anywhere
else in the country, yet officially we have the oldest population in Ireland and
the lowest level of educational attainment. Limerick’s has a moderate crime
problem – we are not the best, we are not the worst. In most years we have
less crime per head of population than Dublin and Waterford but more than
Cork and Galway, yet two national newspapers and one television station
took the crimes committed in the entire city and county (pop. 175,000),
divided them by the official population of the city (55,000) and created their
own figures for Limerick’s crime rate which were more than three times what
the Garda figures later turned out to be. The entirely false claim that Limerick
was the “murder capital of Europe” was based on these dodgy statistics.
The dodgy statistics were only possible because of the boundary.

The image the boundary gives of Limerick is of an old, tired, socially
disadvanaged and crime ridden small town, when in fact we are a young,
vibrant, striving, and safe city. But perception is often more important than
reality. The difficulties we face in attracting tourists, events and jobs to this
city are exacerbated by the negative image – an image that is bound up with
the boundary.

Diarmuid Scully"
 

Limerick Lad

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
4,609
But what caused the urban sprawl? It didn't just appear. It was a result of each of the three local authorities that adminster Limerick going it alone vis a vis the planning of their little sections of the wider area.

The bad reputation of the city is caused by lazy journalism, but that is a simplification of the problem. The fact that the stats that are published pertaining to Limerick City are misrepresentative because of the boundary issue does not help the journalists. No other city in Ireland suffers from this statistical anomaly.

The city is not going to lose it's council? What gave you that idea? The city will be promoted to third largest city in Ireland (currently fourth), and the authority will represent a population of approximately 190,000 people. If anything it substantially promotes the status of Limerick.

Here's an article I found earlier today in the Limerick Event Guide, which was written by local city councillor, Diarmuid Scully (Fine Gael). Let me say that I am not Diarmuid Scully (nor do I know him, and I've never met him), and I don't support Fine Gael, but in this piece he articulates well the issue.


"The Limerick Boundary Committee make their report on
the City/County boundary issue public this month. We
hand the Talking Point over to this issues feature writer, City
Councillor Diarmuid Scully, to discuss……

Later this month the report to John Gormley from the Limerick boundary
committee will be made public. While often presented as a pointless squabble
between local politicians, the issue of the boundary is the single most
important one affecting our city and the decision that the Minister makes will
have enormous implications in terms of jobs, investment and the quality of
all our lives.

The current truncated boundary does immense damage to our city. Half the
population of Limerick city (55,000 out of 110,000) officially live in county
Limerick. This false representation of reality damages our city in three ways:

1 Resources: The full financial resources of the city are not available
to be spent in the city. Every year Limerick County Council takes some €8
million more from the suburbs of the city then it spends there. This money
from the ratepayers of the greater city is used to provide services elsewhere
in rural county Limerick. The net effect of this annual transfer of funds from
urban to rural Limerick is that Limerick County Council is now the richest local
authority in the country, while Limerick city council is the second poorest
(after Donegal). We can see the ill effects of this annual plundering of the
city in our pot-holed roads and footpaths, in our dilapidated housing stock
and in the empty shops on our main city streets.

2 Social dumping: Limerick County Council provides no social
housing in its half of Limerick city. It provides no assistance to the homeless
and no public sports facilities of any kind. By refusing to accept its
responsibilities the county council has engineered a situation where all of the
socially disadvantaged areas in a city of 110,000 are concentrated in a small
geographic area. As a result Limerick is now the most socially divided city
in Ireland.

3 Image: Limerick is a city of 110,000 people. We are the 3rd largest
city in the state. Everyone who lives here knows that, yet every guide to
Ireland from the national census, to Lonely Planet to the CIA factbook claims
that Limerick’s real population is just 55,000 and that we are the 4th largest
city in the state.

Limerick has the youngest population of any city in Ireland and has a higher
proportion of its population in fulltime third level education than anywhere
else in the country, yet officially we have the oldest population in Ireland and
the lowest level of educational attainment. Limerick’s has a moderate crime
problem – we are not the best, we are not the worst. In most years we have
less crime per head of population than Dublin and Waterford but more than
Cork and Galway, yet two national newspapers and one television station
took the crimes committed in the entire city and county (pop. 175,000),
divided them by the official population of the city (55,000) and created their
own figures for Limerick’s crime rate which were more than three times what
the Garda figures later turned out to be. The entirely false claim that Limerick
was the “murder capital of Europe” was based on these dodgy statistics.
The dodgy statistics were only possible because of the boundary.

The image the boundary gives of Limerick is of an old, tired, socially
disadvanaged and crime ridden small town, when in fact we are a young,
vibrant, striving, and safe city. But perception is often more important than
reality. The difficulties we face in attracting tourists, events and jobs to this
city are exacerbated by the negative image – an image that is bound up with
the boundary.

Diarmuid Scully"
Brosnan's plan as far as I can discern is to merge Limerick City and County Council making it in essence a whole of Limerick County Council similar to Kerry, Mayo, Wexford, etc. County Councils, differing Limerick from Ireland's other major cities like Cork, Galway and Waterford who will continue to have both a city and county council thereby downgrading officially Limerick City to being the largest urban centre (town) within its county rather that its current status as a city.

My reading of Diarmuid Scully's piece is that he is putting forward a strong argument for the enlargement of Limerick City to include within new boundaries Limerick City's real population of 110,000 who live in its suburbs and that the City Council would benefit by having an extra €8 million in income (currently hijacked by Limerick County Council) from the commercial rates generated by its surrounding shopping centres, retail parks and industrial estates which were part of Limerick's natural contiguous growth.

Brosnan's proposal is in fact a fudge where by merging Limerick City and County Council the politically uncomfortable enlargement of Limerick City to its natural boundaries is parked and gives John Gormley an out from forcing through changes which would receive little welcome from politicians in either County Limerick or County Clare County Councils.
 
Last edited:

arctic fox

Member
Joined
May 28, 2007
Messages
84
Again, I disagree. The Local Gorvernment Committee report clearly outlines the new city boundary, which is more or less what the city was looking for. Effectively he has said there is a defined urban and a rural part to the new area and he cites examples of where this model has been successful.

Remember that the bulk of power within a council is at official level (manager, directors of services, engineers, etc) rather than at political level. The problem up to now is that the officials, not the politicians, were too good at looking after their own areas, and they all piggy-backed on the urban core of Limerick in order to raise revenue for themselves. Hence, we have a city that is divided three ways. Those officials will now come under the one umbrella. The politicians, as always, will fight for their little patches, and that is what they are there for. But that does not mean the council will lose it's focus. If anything, it will be far more focussed than the current situation.

Granting a boundary extension to the city would basically have pushed the COUNTY council into a tight spot. It's population would have been cut by more than one third, and it would also have lost the rate revenue that it currently enjoys from businesses on the edge of the city. You can't just say 'too bad' about that. There would have been incentive for the county to promote development out beyond the new boundary in order to keep itself going leading to a worse situation than we already have.

I think you are being disingenuous and/or naive about Gormley's motives and his strategy. No other minister has taken the issue as seriously as he has. I am not a supporter of any political party, but this much is clear.
 

Limerick Lad

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
4,609
Again, I disagree. The Local Gorvernment Committee report clearly outlines the new city boundary, which is more or less what the city was looking for. Effectively he has said there is a defined urban and a rural part to the new area and he cites examples of where this model has been successful.

Remember that the bulk of power within a council is at official level (manager, directors of services, engineers, etc) rather than at political level. The problem up to now is that the officials, not the politicians, were too good at looking after their own areas, and they all piggy-backed on the urban core of Limerick in order to raise revenue for themselves. Hence, we have a city that is divided three ways. Those officials will now come under the one umbrella. The politicians, as always, will fight for their little patches, and that is what they are there for. But that does not mean the council will lose it's focus. If anything, it will be far more focussed than the current situation.

Granting a boundary extension to the city would basically have pushed the COUNTY council into a tight spot. It's population would have been cut by more than one third, and it would also have lost the rate revenue that it currently enjoys from businesses on the edge of the city. You can't just say 'too bad' about that. There would have been incentive for the county to promote development out beyond the new boundary in order to keep itself going leading to a worse situation than we already have.

I think you are being disingenuous and/or naive about Gormley's motives and his strategy. No other minister has taken the issue as seriously as he has. I am not a supporter of any political party, but this much is clear.
All the political parties have kicked this issue to touch and Brosnan has come up with an ideal plan for Government by proposing the unification of Limerick City and County Councils as one body, enabling no decision on the real issue facing Limerick City, the financial stranglehold by Limerick County Council and to a much lesser extent Clare County Council has on the landlocked Limerick City draining its potential revenues to edge of town developments.
 

arctic fox

Member
Joined
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Messages
84
All the political parties have kicked this issue to touch and Brosnan has come up with an ideal plan for Government by proposing the unification of Limerick City and County Councils as one body, enabling no decision on the real issue facing Limerick City, the financial stranglehold by Limerick County Council and to a much lesser extent Clare County Council has on the landlocked Limerick City draining its potential revenues to edge of town developments.
For some reason you fail to see how simply granting a boundary extension would not solve that problem (I've explained a few times already), whereas Brosnan's proposals do. They offer a far better solution for all of the people of the Mid-West, including Limerick people.

Brosnan, if his report is implemented, has actually "enabled a decision on the real issue facing Limerick City", to use your own words. You, however, can't seem to see that. He has proposed a boundary extension (which makes a lot of sense) and also proposed amalgamating the two councils (which also makes a lot of sense), so that the region can move forward with one purpose.
 

Limerick Lad

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Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
4,609
For some reason you fail to see how simply granting a boundary extension would not solve that problem (I've explained a few times already), whereas Brosnan's proposals do. They offer a far better solution for all of the people of the Mid-West, including Limerick people.

Brosnan, if his report is implemented, has actually "enabled a decision on the real issue facing Limerick City", to use your own words. You, however, can't seem to see that. He has proposed a boundary extension (which makes a lot of sense) and also proposed amalgamating the two councils (which also makes a lot of sense), so that the region can move forward with one purpose.
What you fail to see is Brosnan's supposed boundary extension is only window dressing to hide the fact that his proposal is to subsume Limerick City into a Greater Limerick County Council.
What would be the purpose of having a boundary extension when Limerick City and Limerick are effectively to become one, administered by a single authority.
 

arctic fox

Member
Joined
May 28, 2007
Messages
84
What you fail to see is Brosnan's supposed boundary extension is only window dressing to hide the fact that his proposal is to subsume Limerick City into a Greater Limerick County Council.
What would be the purpose of having a boundary extension when Limerick City and Limerick are effectively to become one, administered by a single authority.
They are going to be one area with a clearly defined urban area which has a particular plan and priorities for it, and a clearly defined rural area, which will have a different plan and different priorities. It's not rocket science. Just because it's a single authority doesn't mean that there is no purpose to a boundary. The boundary will define the urban and rural areas. It's definitely not a case of subsuming Limerick City into a Greater Limerick County Council.
 

Limerick Lad

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Joined
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Messages
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They are going to be one area with a clearly defined urban area which has a particular plan and priorities for it, and a clearly defined rural area, which will have a different plan and different priorities. It's not rocket science. Just because it's a single authority doesn't mean that there is no purpose to a boundary. The boundary will define the urban and rural areas. It's definitely not a case of subsuming Limerick City into a Greater Limerick County Council.
The problem for Limerick City is not about defining which are urban and rural areas but financial, people living in those areas of the city now controlled by Limerick County are exactly that, people living in Limerick City as are all those businesses that now pay rates to Limerick County Council, businesses in Limerick City yet not contributing one cent to the well being of the city which sustains their businesses.
An amalgamated Limerick City and County addresses some of the financial inequities but the overall effect will be a reduction in status of Limerick City to that of a county town like Tralee, Ennis and Kilkenny albeit a very substantial town population wise.
 
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