Right of access to historical sites

GrainneDee

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Oct 12, 2011
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Someone was telling me the other day that he'd tried to visit the giant Iron Age Hill fort Dinas Dinorwig (North West Wales) recently, but the owner had chased him away.

If you 're not aware of the site, see here - http://youtu.be/PDF68mbe0F0

It's eady to understand the point of view of landowners not wanting loads of people on their land, but it seems a pity that this ancient - & historically important site is only viewable by him & his family.

Does Ireland have a law ensuring public access to sites like this? If not, should it have?
Not quite as old, but an interesting place nevertheless; the tower in Tramore with the Metalman on top can be seen from all over the bay, but can't be accessed by the public. It would be such a good tourist attraction, terrible shame.
 


Therightroad

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Dec 12, 2010
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You could just say your a traveller looking for your dog( or Rhino) and if anyone opens their mouth ..start on about discrimination and travellers rights....works everywhere else in Irish society....
 

Cai

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May 30, 2004
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All sounds well and good in theory until the crusties, pagans, vegans, crystal gazers and drop outs start descending on your land and converting it into a dire makeshift permanent smelly folk festival.
You rarely see anyone in the more famous forts such as Dun Aengus & Tre'r Ceiri.
 

Coles

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Sep 30, 2006
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I know - but it used to be a cottage. You can do what you like with derelict cottages.
You definitely can not! If a property is derelict then it is most likely that a full new planning application would be required before any work is done to it. Even if the property was not derelict you would likely still need a planning application before renovating it and definitely if you were extending it by more than 400 sq ft.
 


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