Rising Inequality, the Decline of Democracy, and Trump's election -- in a Whiteboard Animimation

Finbar10

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There's a particularly nice whiteboard animation doing the rounds at the moment on twitter by Robert Reich (he has quite a few more in a similar vein over on www.inequalitymedia.org).

This one really nicely outlines relative equality in the US after the war, the breakdown of this post-war consensus and increasing inequality from about the 1970s onwards, culminating in the recent crash with its bailouts for the 1%, the subsequent anger, Trump, and where do we go from here.

[video=youtube;gSlHVZpNxMM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=gSlHVZpNxMM[/video]

IMO this whiteboard animation very nicely and accurately captures (in a concise 6 minutes) the inequality and anger that culminated in Trump in the US.

So, P.iesters, accurate narrative or more anti-Trump begrudgery? :)
 


Franzoni

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Some good points that i would agree with but at 1.25 (the great U turn) it was Clinton who allowed the repeal of the Glass–Steagall act who some would argue allowed the "too big to to fail " banks gain so much power and helped to cause the 2008 crash....

The whole thing is off it's chump at the moment and i doubt it matters who is running things at this stage....
 

Analyzer

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Very amusing. Robert Reich is part of the problem. He served under Slick Willy. And Slick Willy repealed Glass Steagal. And he pushed through legislation that resulted in subprime housing bubbling. Clinton also assisted the PRC enter the WTO. And there was Slick Willy's foreign policy. And his domestic debacles. All of which have been ignored by RR.

Now he is imagining that he can sell himself as being part of the solution. And therefore he must forget a lot of things.

This is all a bit Meehaul-Martinesque.
 

Finbar10

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Very amusing. Robert Reich is part of the problem. Now he is imagining that he can sell himself as being part of the solution.

This is all a bit Meehaul-Martinesque.
Sure, it's a bit selective in its treatment (though I'd agree with the broad picture), but I nonetheless thought it was pretty slick and well-put-together as these kinds of whiteboard animations go.
 

Analyzer

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Alright. The content. Lots of oversimplification. And a hard sell.

A hard sell that amounts to more promises by the same institutional largesse parasites who are telling us that everything will be perfect if we give them more power and no criticism.

The oligarchy OWNS the institutional left. Just look at the Clinton Foundation. The same people who presided over the coronation of La Rodham are still in control of the Democratic Party.
 

devoutcapitalist

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1) There has been a massive expansion of the welfare state in America since the 1960's to the point where it will bankrupt America.
2) Cities like Chicago and Detroit have been buying off the teaching unions for decades and they have many of the crappiest public schools in America.
3) Militant trade unions in the auto industry are one of the reasons why so many jobs were lost from the 70's onwards. Also the fact that these companies failed to move with the times.
4) As for child poverty perhaps if America didn't have such a high divorce rate there would be far less child poverty especially amongst black kids.

Yes the banks were reckless in their lending policies from the 80's onwards, however this video from Reich is very one sided and quite simplistic.
 

Finbar10

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1) There has been a massive expansion of the welfare state in America since the 1960's to the point where it will bankrupt America.
2) Cities like Chicago and Detroit have been buying off the teaching unions for decades and they have many of the crappiest public schools in America.
3) Militant trade unions in the auto industry are one of the reasons why so many jobs were lost from the 70's onwards. Also the fact that these companies failed to move with the times.
4) As for child poverty perhaps if America didn't have such a high divorce rate there would be far less child poverty especially amongst black kids.

Yes the banks were reckless in their lending policies from the 80's onwards, however this video from Reich is very one sided and quite simplistic.
US capitalism hasn't really delivered in relative terms for most US people since about the 1970s. From the time of FDR and the New Deal in the late 1930s a rising tide did lift all boats, hand-in-hand with widespread unionization and reasonable labour protections. From the 1970s onwards, for various reasons (globalization etc.), real income for typical Americans has gone nowhere with the lower deciles even falling (despite welfare programmes). The top 20% has risen a little but it's only really the top 1-3% that have seen continual big increases. Labour protections have been eroded. A lot of blue-collar workers just can't get decent jobs anymore. The dismantling of Glass Steagal contributed to a credit bubble which papered over the gap over quite a while. Restrictions on large political donations from corporations and individuals have gone (court judgements helped there). The US is heading in a plutocratic direction (akin to the Gilded Age). Perhaps the FDR and post-war period was the exception rather than the rule in terms of inequality and capitalism, and they are just heading back to the norm?
 

Finbar10

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Alright. The content. Lots of oversimplification. And a hard sell.
It is twitter! Was probably too long a sound-bite even as is! :)

A hard sell that amounts to more promises by the same institutional largesse parasites who are telling us that everything will be perfect if we give them more power and no criticism.

The oligarchy OWNS the institutional left. Just look at the Clinton Foundation. The same people who presided over the coronation of La Rodham are still in control of the Democratic Party.
I think he was a Sanders supporter. Probably all part of a push to strengthen the Sanders wing of the Democratic party.
 
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Mick Mac

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Any democrat watching that will be asking themselves "How can we challenge privilege? How can we get across to a working class lad in a trailer park that he is the fount of all evil because of the way he looks"
 

owedtojoy

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Very amusing. Robert Reich is part of the problem. He served under Slick Willy. And Slick Willy repealed Glass Steagal. And he pushed through legislation that resulted in subprime housing bubbling. Clinton also assisted the PRC enter the WTO. And there was Slick Willy's foreign policy. And his domestic debacles. All of which have been ignored by RR.

Now he is imagining that he can sell himself as being part of the solution. And therefore he must forget a lot of things.

This is all a bit Meehaul-Martinesque.
But the Financial Crash actually happened under the God-Like Republican George W Bush.

And yer man Willie must have been pretty Slick to leave a booming economy with a 0 deficit that Bush crashed so badly that another Democrat called Obama had to save it.

And now we have the God-Like Lardarse making the Lobbyists and Wall Street Bankers super-rich - again!

So this post is just the usual lying propaganda shyte you push
 

owedtojoy

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There's a particularly nice whiteboard animation doing the rounds at the moment on twitter by Robert Reich (he has quite a few more in a similar vein over on www.inequalitymedia.org).

This one really nicely outlines relative equality in the US after the war, the breakdown of this post-war consensus and increasing inequality from about the 1970s onwards, culminating in the recent crash with its bailouts for the 1%, the subsequent anger, Trump, and where do we go from here.

[video=youtube;gSlHVZpNxMM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=gSlHVZpNxMM[/video]

IMO this whiteboard animation very nicely and accurately captures (in a concise 6 minutes) the inequality and anger that culminated in Trump in the US.

So, P.iesters, accurate narrative or more anti-Trump begrudgery? :)
Pretty accurate.

The Reagan-Thatcher years were a disaster, especially when they brought corporate lobbyists into the heart of Government.

The Citizens United decision in the US enabled unlimited corporate donations, leading to the Super-PACs that terrify Congressmen into submission, especially Republican ones.
 
D

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US capitalism hasn't really delivered in relative terms for most US people since about the 1970s. From the time of FDR and the New Deal in the late 1930s a rising tide did lift all boats, hand-in-hand with widespread unionization and reasonable labour protections. From the 1970s onwards, for various reasons (globalization etc.), real income for typical Americans has gone nowhere with the lower deciles even falling (despite welfare programmes). The top 20% has risen a little but it's only really the top 1-3% that have seen continual big increases. Labour protections have been eroded. A lot of blue-collar workers just can't get decent jobs anymore. The dismantling of Glass Steagal contributed to a credit bubble which papered over the gap over quite a while. Restrictions on large political donations from corporations and individuals have gone (court judgements helped there). The US is heading in a plutocratic direction (akin to the Gilded Age). Perhaps the FDR and post-war period was the exception rather than the rule in terms of inequality and capitalism, and they are just heading back to the norm?
Cheaper labour and technology is arguably largely responsible for that.

Glass Stegal did cause the last melty, but if you look at the history of financial regulation since the late 19th century, it's one of reg followed by de-reg, followed by reg and so on.

Probably outside the whiteboards purview, but AI is had a bigger say in transactions across the global casino since the 80s. In fact I think Greenspan or someone introduced legislation to curtail it, and that was subsequently revoked?
 

NYCKY

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There's a particularly nice whiteboard animation doing the rounds at the moment on twitter by Robert Reich (he has quite a few more in a similar vein over on www.inequalitymedia.org).

This one really nicely outlines relative equality in the US after the war, the breakdown of this post-war consensus and increasing inequality from about the 1970s onwards, culminating in the recent crash with its bailouts for the 1%, the subsequent anger, Trump, and where do we go from here.

[video=youtube;gSlHVZpNxMM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=gSlHVZpNxMM[/video]

IMO this whiteboard animation very nicely and accurately captures (in a concise 6 minutes) the inequality and anger that culminated in Trump in the US.

So, P.iesters, accurate narrative or more anti-Trump begrudgery? :)
I think it was a bit oversimplified, slick but a bit dumbed down at the same time.

Reich was part of the problem himself, and so was the Clinton administration but he completely exonerates himself and that administration from any blame.

The strong union stuff was too much. Cities and municipalities all over the country have massive pension deficits because of the greedy demands of the Unions. City politicians are good at vote buying but stiffing tax payers.
 

Mick Mac

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But the Financial Crash actually happened under the God-Like Republican George W Bush.

And yer man Willie must have been pretty Slick to leave a booming economy with a 0 deficit that Bush crashed so badly that another Democrat called Obama had to save it.

And now we have the God-Like Lardarse making the Lobbyists and Wall Street Bankers super-rich - again!

So this post is just the usual lying propaganda shyte you push
A standard republican: sold out to big oil, in the pocket of a foreign power (Saudi Arabia), relentlessly anti worker but feeding people hope that there on their side
 

GabhaDubh

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Conveniently to the right of the top illustration of the second column, he drew a little bubble with this remark “with exception of the Clinton Administration”. Just more revisionism.
 

valamhic

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US capitalism hasn't really delivered in relative terms for most US people since about the 1970s. From the time of FDR and the New Deal in the late 1930s a rising tide did lift all boats, hand-in-hand with widespread unionization and reasonable labour protections. From the 1970s onwards, for various reasons (globalization etc.), real income for typical Americans has gone nowhere with the lower deciles even falling (despite welfare programmes). The top 20% has risen a little but it's only really the top 1-3% that have seen continual big increases. Labour protections have been eroded. A lot of blue-collar workers just can't get decent jobs anymore. The dismantling of Glass Steagal contributed to a credit bubble which papered over the gap over quite a while. Restrictions on large political donations from corporations and individuals have gone (court judgements helped there). The US is heading in a plutocratic direction (akin to the Gilded Age). Perhaps the FDR and post-war period was the exception rather than the rule in terms of inequality and capitalism, and they are just heading back to the norm?
Well North Korean Communism or German Greenism has not delivered much either
 

Mick Mac

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Conveniently to the right of the top illustration of the second column, he drew a little bubble with this remark “with exception of the Clinton Administration”. Just more revisionism.
Thought you were a shinner? You seem very off script at times if so.
 

GabhaDubh

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Sure, it's a bit selective in its treatment (though I'd agree with the broad picture), but I nonetheless thought it was pretty slick and well-put-together as these kinds of whiteboard animations go.
A Slick Reich for a Slick Willy.
 

owedtojoy

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A standard republican: sold out to big oil, in the pocket of a foreign power (Saudi Arabia), relentlessly anti worker but feeding people hope that there on their side
You mean Donald Trump, obviously.

We could chart his course from "rebel" against the "Republican elite" to the President who is fulfilling its corporate agenda.

The man who went from "draining the Swamp" to the corporate socialism that the plutocrat class desire, exponentially increasing the number of lobbyists in Washington.

That is why McConnell and Ryan are smiling. As are the Kochs, the Mellons, and Adelson.
 


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