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Road safety data


riven

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Penalty points data was issued again today up to November 2007 (from October 2002). It shows that approximately 585,000 point offerces were issued. The vast majority were for speeding
link
A few weeks ago the indo said that 311,000 drivers had been issued with points up to the same period.
link
Assuming 3 penalty points is the average per offerce (worst case I guess) thats nearly 6 points per licence which is now too bad.
However it does show that approximately 15% of the driving population are offending (~2.1 million drivers) which is quite high.

I decided to snoop around the site and I found this ugly table.
link
According to it, the fatalities on the roads have decreased by 13%. However this is a misnomer as the number of vehicles/licences holders and thus drivers has increased dramatically over that time period. Thus the number of deaths per driver has decreased by approx 38% over this time period which is huge.

It would seem that the penalty points system is work though the twits doing the maths cant work it out yet.
If we take the death rate at 1998 (deaths per vehicle) and multiply that by the number of vehicles in 2005 we get the equivalent number of deaths in 2005 based on 1998 figures. That figure is:
649
The number of deaths in 2005:
399
Thus approx 250 deaths have been saved though the points system, better and safer cars and other improvements from between the two periods.
 

riven

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Consider haulage. Most drivers of these trucks do not own the truck but have to be licenced for it etc. I would expect a difference. I assume that licence holders includes all nationalities i.e. EU licence holder.
 

HanleyS

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Penalty Points are not the only influence on road safety over that period. We have also had drink driving clampdown and our road network has improved with higher quality roads opening. The safety of our vehicles has likely increased too with the scrappage scheme and increased prosperity. The statistics are poor for injuries so we don't know what the effect on these has been.
 

riven

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true but I doubt that the limited safety increases in cars over that period would have such a huge affect. The others factors as a whole though are important.
In general the stats are poor overall. We still do not have conclusive evidence to show that younger drivers are worse.
 

joel

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odie1kanobe said:
A Government success so guess this thread will be short and sweet.

Government success? - I wouldn't call it a success to have over half a million drivers speeding.
 

grainne whale

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Not the Government, the Gardai.
 

GlasgowIrish

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seabhcan said:
Number of vehicles increased by 41% but the number of license holders only by 21%. How are these numbers calculated?

If you drive a polish car using a polish license, which column are you counted in, if any?
they can drive over here without the threat of getting penalty points to their licence if they have a Polish Licence or any other European Driving Licence

New figures released by the Department of Transport show that over 25,000 penalty-point notices have been issued to people caught driving while holding a mobile phone.

The notices have been issued since the offence was introduced in July 2006.

There have been almost 600,000 different penalty point notices issued since the system was introduced in October 2002.

AdvertisementThe most common offence is speeding, with just over 450,000 people being caught for that offence since the start of the system.

According to the department figures, driving without a seat belt is the second most common offence with just over 46,000 people having penalty point notices issued for this.

Overall 133,000 notices were issued to people without a valid driving licence number - meaning they either had no licence or had a foreign one.

Penalty point notices were issued to about 13,000 people for failing to obey traffic lights, and almost 10,000 were issued for crossing a continuous white line.

The least common offences include parking a vehicle in a dangerous position - for which 12 notices were issued - while there were two notices issued for driving a vehicle while unfit
 

HanleyS

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joel said:
Government success? - I wouldn't call it a success to have over half a million drivers speeding.
Correction: Half a million drivers detected "speeding".

The real failure is the disparity in the figures for detections of:
1) "Speeding"
2) Drink Driving
3) Failure to wear a seatbelt / Secure child
4) Unsafe overtaking / driving on wrong side of the road

There should be a high level of detection in each of these categories. not just one.
 
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Let see because the Govt introduced penalty points and tackled the issue of speeding motorists plus spent money on improving roads there has been a significant reduction in the number of people who have died on Irish roads.

Thats a success.
 

HanleyS

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The reduction in road deaths is a success. I think they could improve on that success by tackling a wider range of dangerous behaviours. Maybe that's a better way of putting it. Also rather than patting themselves on the back for reducing deaths they should bring injuries into the picture as these are important too.
 
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HanleyS said:
The reduction in road deaths is a success. I think they could improve on that success by tackling a wider range of dangerous behaviours. Maybe that's a better way of putting it. Also rather than patting themselves on the back for reducing deaths they should bring injuries into the picture as these are important too.
I agree as injuries can have a longer lasting impact on everyone as someone may need to be cared for fr years afterwards.
 

HanleyS

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I think the RSA is actually already addressing the issue of KSI statistics according to their latest strategy document. I'd welcome this development when it moves beyond an espoused strategy. When they start tackling issues other than speeding I will have to find some other issue to rant about. Their most recent ad campaign would suggest they are expanding their focus to include other issues.
 
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HanleyS said:
I think the RSA is actually already addressing the issue of KSI statistics according to their latest strategy document. I'd welcome this development when it moves beyond an espoused strategy. When they start tackling issues other than speeding I will have to find some other issue to rant about. Their most recent ad campaign would suggest they are expanding their focus to include other issues.
Its the old eating the elephant bite by bit and seems to be working.
 

HanleyS

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odie1kanobe said:
Its the old eating the elephant bite by bit and seems to be working.
I'm afraid that doesn't cut it. This particular bite has been chewed to death. It's disgraceful how little attention issues other than speeding receive. Fortunately the RSA seem to be getting more sophisticated and beginning to think holistically. Road safety was neglected previously with only a token misguided effort.
 
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HanleyS said:
odie1kanobe said:
Its the old eating the elephant bite by bit and seems to be working.
I'm afraid that doesn't cut it. This particular bite has been chewed to death. It's disgraceful how little attention issues other than speeding receive. Fortunately the RSA seem to be getting more sophisticated and beginning to think holistically. Road safety was neglected previously with only a token misguided effort.
I guess you have never been in a session of TQM then, the management fab in the 90's where the expression was the way to eat an elephant was bit by bit.

Thats the tackling of road safety issues and its a slow process of targeting speeding first with penalties, infrastructure investment, driver training and getting rid of unqualified drivers off the roads and working through the list bit by bit. Its a slow process with lots of failures but getting death rate down is a success.
 

HanleyS

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No. It's not. Speed is a single issue which accounts for a minority of deaths. It is the only issue which has been tackled until recently. Drink driving despite it's effect on road deaths received token levels of attention, as did seatbelt wearing and child restraints. Who even heard of booster seats before the RSA came on the scene?

Driver training is beginning to be addressed with the clampdown on provisional license drivers. The effect of poor engineering on deaths appears to be ignored or brushed under the carpet. The continued imposition of VRT penalises drivers of newer and safer cars.

I'll recognise the successes of the RSA gladly. The approach to road safety prior to it's establishment was dire. The RSA is only beginning it's work, but to claim that the current disproportionate approach is part of some master plan is frankly a joke.
 

DaveM

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DH, I'd agree on the shooting fish in a barrell analogy to quite an extent. I lost count a long time ago of the number of times I've seen speed traps on the 60km/h stretches of dual carriageway at Cabinteely and Kilmacanogue. Pointless revenue collecting exercises. On the other hand I've never seen a speed trap on the back road between Gorey and Wexford despite travelling it numerous times in the last six years and this is a lethal speedway.

However the figures do show that significant improvements have been made and lives have been saved so credit is due to those involved, most notably the Gardai and the RSA. The random breath testing in particular has been a major improvement. I don't drink myself but I've been breathalised three times in the last year. That's a good thing and I've noticed a marked shift in the attitudes of those who would have been willing to "risk it" in years gone by as the penny is dropping that there is a good chance they'll get caught eventually.
 

riven

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odie1kanobe said:
A Government success so guess this thread will be short and sweet.
reasons why it is not a sucess
1 There are still alot of people dying on the roads. Most of these deaths (88% from the dept website) are due to driver error. This error is heavily influenced by driver trianing vand monitoring - back to the government

2 The government from their own website cannot work out the figures. They are under-estimating their sucess.

It is a massive and welcome improvement. Lets hope this year does better.
 
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