Roger Bannister RIP

Black Swan

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 18, 2014
Messages
5,517
Just heard on the news that Roger Bannister, the first man to run a sub-four-minute mile has died.
 


eoghanacht

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2006
Messages
32,410
His presence on the landing and constant support of the stairs is what he'll be remembered for never mind the running.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
27,746
Twitter
No
Obscure fact- the Irish connection. Roger Bannister's paceman in training to attempt the sub-four minute mile was a fellow called Chris Brasher who used to train by running around the Guinness Brewery grounds in Park Royal in London.

He was an underbrewer for Guinness. Then went on to be one of the founders of the London Marathon event.

Tempting to think he fed Bannister a few pints to perk him up in training.
 
D

Deleted member 48908

Obligatory...

[video=youtube;TYJzcUvS_NU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYJzcUvS_NU[/video]
 

fat finger

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2016
Messages
2,177
Obscure fact- the Irish connection. Roger Bannister's paceman in training to attempt the sub-four minute mile was a fellow called Chris Brasher who used to train by running around the Guinness Brewery grounds in Park Royal in London.

He was an underbrewer for Guinness. Then went on to be one of the founders of the London Marathon event.

Tempting to think he fed Bannister a few pints to perk him up in training.
Hmmm, never heard that suggestion before -that Bannister's achievement was, eh, wind assisted?
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
27,746
Twitter
No
Hmmm, never heard that suggestion before -that Bannister's achievement was, eh, wind assisted?
More like Brasher probably had a few pints on and missed out on the sub-four minute mile. At the time Guinness employees were entitled to something like four free pints a day at work. Mind you in those days they probably went for a few pints after, wood-bine hanging off the lip.

I was reading about some fellow the other day who captained Manchester City and Chelsea in his time, won Wimbledon, was a Rugby international as well I think, and the wikipedia on him said he'd been a heavy smoker all his life.

They made 'em out of iron in those days. Which Guinness probably helped with.
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
47,602
Hmmm, never heard that suggestion before -that Bannister's achievement was, eh, wind assisted?
The "theory" of a circular or elliptical track is that the wind cannot consistently assist anyone in a long race.
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
47,602
More like Brasher probably had a few pints on and missed out on the sub-four minute mile. At the time Guinness employees were entitled to something like four free pints a day at work. Mind you in those days they probably went for a few pints after, wood-bine hanging off the lip.

I was reading about some fellow the other day who captained Manchester City and Chelsea in his time, won Wimbledon, was a Rugby international as well I think, and the wikipedia on him said he'd been a heavy smoker all his life.

They made 'em out of iron in those days. Which Guinness probably helped with.
Chris Chataway was another pacemaker, and he went on to become a Conservative MP.

Brasher won an Olympic gold medal in the Steeplechase at the Melbourne Olympic Games. He was also a founder of the London Marathon, and an entrepreneur who cashed in on the new fashion for exercise and jogging.

Quite a distinguished field.

Bannister was a gentleman. Some anecdotes here:

Sir Roger’s Remarkable Run

My Favorite Roger Bannister Story
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
47,602
The second man to do something does not get much recognition, but spare a thought for John Landy, an Australian miler.

Bannister's record barely stood for six weeks before Landy had broken Bannister's record. In fact, knowing Landy was going after the first sub-4-minute mile was one of the drivers that pushed Bannister to make the attempt.

The two met in the Commonwealth Games in Vancouver in 1954, in what was dubbed "The Race of the Century". Both men broke 4 minutes but Bannister won - on the last bend Landy led him, but glanced over this left shoulder as Bannister sped past him to his right. A bronze statue near the site of the old stadium immortalizes the event.



Landy was also favourite to take the gold in the 1500 metres at the Melbourne Olympics, in which Bannister did not run. But he had to settle for bronze behind Irishman Ron Delaney.

Landy had a successful career in Australian politics.
 
D

Deleted member 48908

The "theory" of a circular or elliptical track is that the wind cannot consistently assist anyone in a long race.
Hmmm....what's that sound the wind makes as something goes flying over one's head?

Oh yeah...Whoosh!
 

Erudite Caveman

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
7,329
The second man to do something does not get much recognition, but spare a thought for John Landy, an Australian miler.

Bannister's record barely stood for six weeks before Landy had broken Bannister's record. In fact, knowing Landy was going after the first sub-4-minute mile was one of the drivers that pushed Bannister to make the attempt.

The two met in the Commonwealth Games in Vancouver in 1954, in what was dubbed "The Race of the Century". Both men broke 4 minutes but Bannister won - on the last bend Landy led him, but glanced over this left shoulder as Bannister sped past him to his right. A bronze statue near the site of the old stadium immortalizes the event.



Landy was also favourite to take the gold in the 1500 metres at the Melbourne Olympics, in which Bannister did not run. But he had to settle for bronze behind Irishman Ron Delaney.

Landy had a successful career in Australian politics.
Once Bannister broke it, Landy's mental block disappeared once the impossible was shown to be possible. Awesome stuff.
 

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
The second man to do something does not get much recognition, but spare a thought for John Landy, an Australian miler.

Bannister's record barely stood for six weeks before Landy had broken Bannister's record. In fact, knowing Landy was going after the first sub-4-minute mile was one of the drivers that pushed Bannister to make the attempt.

The two met in the Commonwealth Games in Vancouver in 1954, in what was dubbed "The Race of the Century". Both men broke 4 minutes but Bannister won - on the last bend Landy led him, but glanced over this left shoulder as Bannister sped past him to his right. A bronze statue near the site of the old stadium immortalizes the event.



Landy was also favourite to take the gold in the 1500 metres at the Melbourne Olympics, in which Bannister did not run. But he had to settle for bronze behind Irishman Ron Delaney.

Landy had a successful career in Australian politics.
Ronnie Delaney beat a field including Australian John Landy to win the Olympic gold medal in Melbourne in 1956, in the metric mile (1,500 metres).
 

silverharp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
16,297
given his schedule he was also a good example of not over training
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,676
Bannister retired after winning the Commonwealth Gold in the same year - 1954!
He always came across as an absolute gentleman, he regarded his work in medicine as far more important than what he achieved in athletics.
His coach told him before he achieved the seemingly impossible (even Everest had been climbed before it) that he had a 3.56 mile in his legs and he would regret it forever if he gave up before breaking the 4 minute barrier!
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,676
Bannister beating Landy to Commonwealth Gold - an absolute classic race -

[video=youtube;jP_NzZP_LK0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jP_NzZP_LK0[/video]
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,676
Roger Bannister on his achievement -

[video=youtube;MUDWE9VQFws]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUDWE9VQFws[/video]
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,676
Just as Sir Roger Bannister was a superb ambassador, has there ever been a greater ambassador for us than The Great Ronnie Delaney?
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
47,602
Ronnie Delaney beat a field including Australian John Landy to win the Olympic gold medal in Melbourne in 1956, in the metric mile (1,500 metres).
Bannister never won an Olympic medal - he made the 1500m final in Helsinki in 1952, but came 4th. He admitted afterwards his training schedule had let him down, the Olympics brought in a semi-final as an extra race, and he was exhausted in the final.
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top