RTE documentary on Irish codebreaking in WW2



gerhard dengler

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Looks interesting.
RTÉ Radio 1: Documentary on One - Richard Hayes, Nazi Codebreaker

It is a documentary abut Richard Hayes who broke some Nazi codes in WW2. Haven't listened to it yet but the Wikipedia page on his work casts some light on the subject.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_J._Hayes
Nice one

One celebrated WW2 codebreaker, he was Irish and was depicted in the film about Alan Turing working at Bletchley Pk, was Cork-born C.H.O'DAlexander (Hugh Alexander).

Alexander was no mean international chess player too.
 

cricket

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Never heard of him, will definitely listen.
 

Ireniall

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Looks interesting.
RTÉ Radio 1: Documentary on One - Richard Hayes, Nazi Codebreaker

It is a documentary abut Richard Hayes who broke some Nazi codes in WW2. Haven't listened to it yet but the Wikipedia page on his work casts some light on the subject.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_J._Hayes
Some decades back my father told me of an interview with Douglas Gageby on RTE radio. A German speaker Gageby had joined the army during the war and was assigned to intelligence. Apparently a Uboat had been acquired by the Irish authorities before the crew could scuttle her and was moored in Cork with an extensive number of both coded and uncoded documents which Gageby was asked to read.

The coded documents were sent up to Trinity presumably to Hayes though he was not mentioned as far as I know-but who else given what we know now. Some days later Gageby was asked to attend a meeting at Trinity with Hayes and a couple of others where they discussed the papers for a little time until there was a knock on the door and a British pilot came in and was handed every one of the documents with Hayes conclusions included presumably.

That was the end of the story but decades later -after he retired I think -Gageby decided to go back to Germany for a time. While there ,travelling on the autobahn somewhere his car broke down and he had to flag passing motorists for help. Suddenly a car stops. The guy leans across and shouts-'you people were nearly the death of me'. It was the British pilot. He had remembered Gageby. In their journey to the nearest garage he told Gageby of his occasional nocturnal journeys across the Irish Sea skipping the waves in order that Irish neutrality would not be compromised.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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Yep. Most people have no idea about how important Ireland was in WW2.
are you talking about De Valera leaking all the strategies over to his mate Uncle Adolf ? the same Uncle who gave dev the balls to declare an independent irish republic in 1937 ?
 

owedtojoy

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are you talking about De Valera leaking all the strategies over to his mate Uncle Adolf ? the same Uncle who gave dev the balls to declare an independent irish republic in 1937 ?
Yeah, Dev boogied on down to the GPO and declared an independent Irish republic in 1937. They gave him some stamps and told him to go home.
 

jmcc

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Apparently a Uboat had been acquired by the Irish authorities before the crew could scuttle her and was moored in Cork with an extensive number of both coded and uncoded documents which Gageby was asked to read.
U Boats used the Engima for their codes. If the Germans didn't get a chance to deep six the machine, its rotors (code wheels) and the codebooks/settings, then it could have been quite a coup. I don't think that I've ever read about Irish Enigma seizures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enigma_machine
 

Orbit v2

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Civic_critic2

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Predictably, this RTÉ documentary is framed entirely in terms of how it fitted into the Allied war effort and D-Day, no mention of what this work meant in terms of Ireland's specific interests other than to suggest, without much evidence, that it helped to stop a German invasion of Ireland. I find such an invasion conducted before an invasion and holding of strategic parts of England & Wales unlikely.

But what of the code-breaking around English and American plans for invasion of the south, a much more likely and imminent possibility? We don't hear anything about that.

Propaganda based on a very superficial narrative.
 
D

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Great thread!

There was another Irish WW2 code breaker out of Queens University, Belshaft. I can't remember his blydi name though!
 

automaticforthepeople

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I was told that his interest in code breaking developed in Clongowes Wood where he played rugby and used to anticipate correctly line out calls from opposition teams. Dev was a Rock boy who was always on the losing side in the day.

Dev got the lard kicked out of him one day in the ruck each call from a throw in as correctly decoded by Hayes. John Bruton's father went to Clongowes and was called the invincible in the day as he used to put the smile on the other side of Dev's puss on the pitch.
 
D

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I can see another self loathing, anti catholic, anti Dev thread in the making!
 

Ireniall

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U Boats used the Engima for their codes. If the Germans didn't get a chance to deep six the machine, its rotors (code wheels) and the codebooks/settings, then it could have been quite a coup. I don't think that I've ever read about Irish Enigma seizures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enigma_machine
Yes - I have no idea and my father cannot now remember the interview at all so I simply don't have any answers. I don't think the enigma machine was mentioned so presumably they didn't get one or it would surely have been mentioned by Gageby even if he didn't know what it was at the time.
 

RasherHash

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I was told that his interest in code breaking developed in Clongowes Wood where he played rugby and used to anticipate correctly line out calls from opposition teams. Dev was a Rock boy who was always on the losing side in the day.

Dev got the lard kicked out of him one day in the ruck each call from a throw in as correctly decoded by Hayes. John Bruton's father went to Clongowes and was called the invincible in the day as he used to put the smile on the other side of Dev's puss on the pitch.
John Unionist's da played for the other team alright :(
 
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RasherHash

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Yes - I have no idea and my father cannot now remember the interview at all so I simply don't have any answers. I don't think the enigma machine was mentioned so presumably they didn't get one or it would surely have been mentioned by Gageby even if he didn't know what it was at the time.
It was ridiculous the extent to which the Germans relied on Enigma, shiploads of vital supplies for Rommel were sunk one after the other because of their belief in its 'unbreakable' code.
 

Ireniall

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It was ridiculous the extent to which the Germans relied on Enigma, shiploads of vital supplies for Rommel were sunk one after the other because of their belief in its 'unbreakable' code.
Yes -I think they upgraded the first one and added another wheel which might indicate that some doubts crept in. The British went to great lengths to disguise the fact that they broke it-allowing Birmingham to be bombed without evacuating- Horrific really but they were horrific times.
 

Catalpast

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Some decades back my father told me of an interview with Douglas Gageby on RTE radio. A German speaker Gageby had joined the army during the war and was assigned to intelligence. Apparently a Uboat had been acquired by the Irish authorities before the crew could scuttle her and was moored in Cork with an extensive number of both coded and uncoded documents which Gageby was asked to read.

The coded documents were sent up to Trinity presumably to Hayes though he was not mentioned as far as I know-but who else given what we know now. Some days later Gageby was asked to attend a meeting at Trinity with Hayes and a couple of others where they discussed the papers for a little time until there was a knock on the door and a British pilot came in and was handed every one of the documents with Hayes conclusions included presumably.

That was the end of the story but decades later -after he retired I think -Gageby decided to go back to Germany for a time. While there ,travelling on the autobahn somewhere his car broke down and he had to flag passing motorists for help. Suddenly a car stops. The guy leans across and shouts-'you people were nearly the death of me'. It was the British pilot. He had remembered Gageby. In their journey to the nearest garage he told Gageby of his occasional nocturnal journeys across the Irish Sea skipping the waves in order that Irish neutrality would not be compromised.
We captured a U boat?:shock:

Where is it now?
 

Catalpast

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Yes -I think they upgraded the first one and added another wheel which might indicate that some doubts crept in. The British went to great lengths to disguise the fact that they broke it-allowing Birmingham to be bombed without evacuating- Horrific really but they were horrific times.
They did?:shock:

Got a Link for that one please....
 


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