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Running Thread

caledhel

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I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread where we can post something about running. I preparing for the Dublin marathon this year. It'll be tough but I'm really looking forward to it. Any advice?


[video=youtube;jQEne-KIpKk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQEne-KIpKk[/video]​
 


Seanie Lemass

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I ran it in 1999.

You need to have a good bit of running under you before you even think about it.

How long you been running?
 

Erudite Caveman

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I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread where we can post something about running. I preparing for the Dublin marathon this year. It'll be tough but I'm really looking forward to it. Any advice?
There is no such thing as the wall. And I don't mean that in a motivational tee-shirt type way. If you train properly - clock enough miles basically, and take about 3-4 gels it will be a nice smooth ride, without any of the dramas that people associate with marathons. But really, the only advice is get the miles in beforehand, and then taper for the last three weeks. And then on the day you'll get to enjoy it and reap what you sowed.
 

caledhel

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I ran it in 1999.

You need to have a good bit of running under you before you even think about it.

How long you been running?
Nice one - just before the millennium.

I'm up to 25km weekend long runs. I'll taper mid October but it's all pain and suffering on Saturdays for the next few weeks. Just in from a 15km.

I find swimming is very good to stretch out tight muscles and ease joints. Doesn't have to be too energetic, just a few lengths. Makes a big difference.
 

caledhel

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There is no such thing as the wall. And I don't mean that in a motivational tee-shirt type way. If you train properly - clock enough miles basically, and take about 3-4 gels it will be a nice smooth ride, without any of the dramas that people associate with marathons. But really, the only advice is get the miles in beforehand, and then taper for the last three weeks. And then on the day you'll get to enjoy it and reap what you sowed.
I reckon the wall is when your brain runs out of sugar and has to switch energy sources. That's why the despondency sets in and your energy drops - using gels overcomes it. Imagine what it was like before them. Trying to convert fat into energy rather than using carbs slows you down big time. Still, you have do the long runs before it to temper the body to distance.

I'm not quick, I just want to survive it mostly! I'm training for it sure enough.
 

Erudite Caveman

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I reckon the wall is when your brain runs out of sugar and has to switch energy sources. That's why the despondency sets in and your energy drops - using gels overcomes it. Imagine what it was like before them. Trying to convert fat into energy rather than using carbs slows you down big time. Still, you have do the long runs before it to temper the body to distance.

I'm not quick, I just want to survive it mostly! I'm training for it sure enough.
That's kinda the situation. But it is your muscles running out of glycogen rather than your brain running out of sugar. Train yourself to be able to have the energy stores for about 20-22 miles in your leg muscles combined with more efficient fat utilisation. So really you just need to look at ingesting enough fuel to cover less than 10k - which is roughly about 600 calories. But that's the easy bit, so not worth focusing on. Training the muscles to be able to store that sort of fuel levels is the hard bit. That's what the long slow runs and the overall mileage is all about.
 

caledhel

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That's kinda the situation. But it is your muscles running out of glycogen rather than your brain running out of sugar. Train yourself to be able to have the energy stores for about 20-22 miles in your leg muscles combined with more efficient fat utilisation. So really you just need to look at ingesting enough fuel to cover less than 10k - which is roughly about 600 calories. But that's the easy bit, so not worth focusing on. Training the muscles to be able to store that sort of fuel levels is the hard bit. That's what the long slow runs and the overall mileage is all about.
What do think of carbing up before the long run? I always do it although I've heard it doesn't make any difference. Is there anything in addition to long runs that helps to train the muscles to store more glycogen?

I'm running four days a week which is less than the five. I do pilates two days. It's great to do a bit of exercise with Mná na hÉireann - I'm a bit of lump at pilates in comparison.

Exercising core muscles and deep stretching is very important. It helps to avoid, or at least mitigate, injuries. As the distance goes up the alignment of one's gait wobbles as muscles tire and that puts much more pressure on joints and ligaments. I think pilates is a good idea as supporting training.
 

gerhard dengler

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I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread where we can post something about running. I preparing for the Dublin marathon this year. It'll be tough but I'm really looking forward to it. Any advice?


[video=youtube;jQEne-KIpKk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQEne-KIpKk[/video]​
Fair dues for creating an interesting thread.

Good luck with the marathon training.

I've never ran a marathon myself but I do enjoy running and I try to do 7.5km run at least three times per week, to try to maintain some sort of level of "fitness".
 

Carlos Danger

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What is it that you people are running from?
 

Seanie Lemass

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If you doing long runs already then you will be fine. I would be wary about changing your diet in last few days, so avoid "carbing up" would be my advice.

There is definitely something about running 26 miles all the same!
 

Erudite Caveman

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What do think of carbing up before the long run? I always do it although I've heard it doesn't make any difference. Is there anything in addition to long runs that helps to train the muscles to store more glycogen?

I'm running four days a week which is less than the five. I do pilates two days. It's great to do a bit of exercise with Mná na hÉireann - I'm a bit of lump at pilates in comparison.

Exercising core muscles and deep stretching is very important. It helps to avoid, or at least mitigate, injuries. As the distance goes up the alignment of one's gait wobbles as muscles tire and that puts much more pressure on joints and ligaments. I think pilates is a good idea as supporting training.
I wouldn't do any carb loading before long runs. I do before a marathon, but it just doesn't suit some people. If you do, don't overthink it and just eat more bread with every meal in the last three days before it. As Seanie Lemass said, the days before the marathon are not the time to go changing your diet.

For training long runs I don't eat beforehand, no breakfast etc.. (but don't do this if you don't already), nor during the run, in order to force that adaptation. The one exception is that if you aren't familiar with gels but are thinking of taking them in Dublin, then do take one or two at 10km intervals on a long run to make sure they don't upset your stomach. You don't want to discover that on the day.

The pilates is a great idea, and should stand to you late in the race by keeping your posture and consequently your efficiency. But ultimately there is nothing better than for running often and running longer, so keep that up.
 

caledhel

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What is it that you people are running from?
With running there's this moment you reach once you've warmed up when your body is producing work but you're okay - a kind of golden medium. It can be really hard at times too but that's when you gain a definite sense of achievement.

Running makes you more resilient and resolute for sure. There's a tremendous general feeling of well-being brought about by it. You do get more confidence in yourself too because you get used to doing something that's difficult and requires hard work to keep your feet moving.

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’
There's always somewhere you're running to, an objective, rather than something you're from. That's how it works for me anyhow.
 

caledhel

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I wouldn't do any carb loading before long runs. I do before a marathon, but it just doesn't suit some people. If you do, don't overthink it and just eat more bread with every meal in the last three days before it. As Seanie Lemass said, the days before the marathon are not the time to go changing your diet.

For training long runs I don't eat beforehand, no breakfast etc.. (but don't do this if you don't already), nor during the run, in order to force that adaptation. The one exception is that if you aren't familiar with gels but are thinking of taking them in Dublin, then do take one or two at 10km intervals on a long run to make sure they don't upset your stomach. You don't want to discover that on the day.

The pilates is a great idea, and should stand to you late in the race by keeping your posture and consequently your efficiency. But ultimately there is nothing better than for running often and running longer, so keep that up.
Thanks for the pointers, it's not long now.
 

caledhel

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Went for the long run today. It was a bit damp. Anyway got there. Went for a swim and sauna after it. I find getting the before and after stretches in make life a lot better. Best not to skip them even if they do take ten minutes each side.
 

retep

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I wouldn't do any carb loading before long runs. I do before a marathon, but it just doesn't suit some people. If you do, don't overthink it and just eat more bread with every meal in the last three days before it. As Seanie Lemass said, the days before the marathon are not the time to go changing your diet. For training long runs I don't eat beforehand, no breakfast etc.. (but don't do this if you don't already), nor during the run, in order to force that adaptation. The one exception is that if you aren't familiar with gels but are thinking of taking them in Dublin, then do take one or two at 10km intervals on a long run to make sure they don't upset your stomach. You don't want to discover that on the day. The pilates is a great idea, and should stand to you late in the race by keeping your posture and consequently your efficiency. But ultimately there is nothing better than for running often and running longer, so keep that up.
Only happened on this thread by accident whilst browsing the sports section.

With 3 marathons under my belt (2 x Dublin and 1 NYC) I'd echo all the excellent advice from EC above.

I think I generally done my long runs these weeks in run up to Dublin goin up to about 21 miles in 2nd week in Oct and tapering off after that. I used place energy drink bottles at 3 mile intervals along my route the day before. Don't think I ate much before these runs apart from a continental breakfast (runs usually started around 1-3pm). Whilst I did the gels never really got into them and found they and the energy drinks (if not the ones u are used to) can wreak havoc on your stomach on actual race day.

Re carb loading before race, I'd say like Seanie, stick to what ur used to and definitely don't go changing your diet no matter what the experts advise.

Other pointers (many which I expect you've learned already)

Grease those nipples and crotch area liberally with Vaseline and cover the nipples with sticky tape.

Wear the same shoes you've worn and broken in in the three months before the race.

Plan your race day kit carefully. Avoid cotton. Consider disposable leggings which you can cast off round Chapelizod or mill town.

Wear a hat and put your name on the front of your shirt (it's amazing the lift you get out of someone shouting "come on retep" at mile 24!)

Plan your pre race accommodation carefully. You need a good nights sleep and no disturbance or distraction (some parts of Dublin can be very loud round this time with Halloween crackers and fireworks) and it's nice to be able to handily nip back for a cold bath and a snooze post race.

Pace yourself. Know your splits. Don't get caught up in the enthusiasm of the day and go out fast or try to beat what your really capable of. No matter how much you've prepared the last 4 miles will be very tough, probably hellish. Be mentally prepared for this. Don't quit, walk if necessary. Embrace the support, they're brilliant.

Drink some water at every water stop and avail of the portaloos en route (or the trees in Phoenix park!)

Bring a few rennies or similar for if your stomach plays up (even though they never gave me much relief)

And finally, enjoy yourself. It can be painful, harrowing and emotional but the exhaultation and sense of achievement when you finish is incredible and will likely move you to tears.

Good luck.
 

toconn

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Interesting thread lads , thank you . Not much of a distance runner myself , never was and can't imagine doing a 26 miler ever. Too many years of rugby and subsequent knocks and wear to run too far without knee / hip issues. That said I have rediscovered distance cycling taking in a nice pace and have my beady eye on the ring of Kerry event etc so some tips on this thread I feel are relevant .
 

retep

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Interesting thread lads , thank you . Not much of a distance runner myself , never was and can't imagine doing a 26 miler ever. Too many years of rugby and subsequent knocks and wear to run too far without knee / hip issues. That said I have rediscovered distance cycling taking in a nice pace and have my beady eye on the ring of Kerry event etc so some tips on this thread I feel are relevant .
Tip for the RoK. If you go anti-clockwise stay out of Healy Raes by the time you get to Kilgarvin. You will despise the village by the time you get there and will be just longing for the finish line (and Kilgarvin is no place to finish!)

All joking aside though, there is a pleasure and satisfaction in long distance cycling that one can never hope to attain in running. I've very much switched to the cycling from running too in recent years. I've even discovered a perverse satisfaction and attraction to the pain of hill climbs. Much easier to attune and adjust oneself to than 20+ miles of pounding it out on foot over concrete or Tarmac. It's also nice over time to discover the merits of a good bike and splash out and treat yourself accordingly in incremental leaps. (Problem there is you end up with a bike stable unable to part with sentimental attachments!)
 

Orbit v2

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Use a large bin-liner with holes cut out of it to keep yourself warm at the start line. You'll be hanging around for a while and can throw it away just before the start.
 

Zapped(CAPITALISMROTS)

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Rots does not believing in running.....(except from responsibilities) !:rolleyes: lol
 

caledhel

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[video=youtube;-OUeLsc0SIU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OUeLsc0SIU[/video]​
 


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