Rural Ireland. Is there any point?

Eventualities

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Article hereI don't understand why this is a challenge to be overcome, as distinct from a reality to be finally accepted. Taking the conclusion from the final reportOur rural areas are relatively cheap to live in. They still don't hold on to population.

Which points to a reality that we struggle with. Rural Ireland is a pretty dismal place, with a poor quality of life. People choose to leave. Let's accept that, and help them.
My family won't leave the village and FFFG has carpet-bombed rural Ireland so badly with austerity there's no hope of a future.
 


valamhic

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They should have stood up to the alcholic MOT when he brought in the new blood offences, he has stuck the knive into rural Ireland, more damage than poor broadband will ever do. Heard of fella going home from work last week was stopped 3 evenings in a row and breathalized, clear each time.Our small town the GS are pulling both in the mornings and evenings, even if they get a taxi or a seat to town, have a couple of drinks come morning they could be done.
SR wants this country to be alcoholic free like himself, a person can drive home after a couple of pints, driving at 30/40 miles per hour no problem, the bigg problem is people go out to a disco, have a all types of alcohil, sit into their car, drive at 80/100 miles per hour with no seat belts. Instead of people being killed in cars, people will be killed walking home or by suicide.
Their was a councillor on Midwest radio today and he gave stats of countries where alcohil is banned, the amount of people killed on these countries roads comparing the different population would be a ratio of 1 in Ireland to several 100's in Iran, Saudai Arabia + more.
The immigrants caused a lot of the accident in the past 10 years. We should have lept them out and we might not be in this mess.
 

valamhic

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If the govt persists with the foolish plan to import millions more people from abroad, we can kiss goodbye to the peace and quiet rural Ireland offers to retired persons, and to people generally who need a break from the hustle and bustle of crime ridden cities.
There is still hope we can beat the established parties. All we need is a bit of luck and get support for Irexit. Europe has nothing more to offer.
 

Eventualities

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The immigrants caused a lot of the accident in the past 10 years. We should have lept them out and we might not be in this mess.
This is the kind of bigoted, uncited gas that lads write when parodying the far-right.
 

Eventualities

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There is still hope we can beat the established parties. All we need is a bit of luck and get support for Irexit. Europe has nothing more to offer.
No chance. Only a socialised union of countries working to forward the postwar consensus and advance the working class will beat the neoliberal nightmare of the EU and the Troika.
 

valamhic

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This is the kind of bigoted, uncited gas that lads write when parodying the far-right.
Road accident death statistics prove that immigrants were the cause of a high proportion of fatal traffic accidents in the past 20 years. The suffering caused to Irish people was very severe and resulted in a greater imposition on Irish motorists than would other wise be necessary.
 

valamhic

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No chance. Only a socialised union of countries working to forward the postwar consensus and advance the working class will beat the neoliberal nightmare of the EU and the Troika.
Socialism does nothing for the working class of the country which elects them, it does good for the working class of migrants who don't elect them.
 

TweetyBird

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Snobbery towards townies is part of of the reason for too much one off houses out the country. Couldn't bear living amongst the plebs in town. Not the only reason but still there.
 

Buchaill Dana

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What do you think is the bigger scam? Renewable energy or NIMBY objectors costing the state millions?
 

valamhic

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What do you think is the bigger scam? Renewable energy or NIMBY objectors costing the state millions?
The charter of fundamental Human rights of the EU provides for the right to participate in the affairs of the Union. The Lisbon treaty promised a good environment for the enjoyment of the citizens and the right of the public to participate in decision making impacting on the environment. The Aarhus convention was signed by the EU on behalf of its citizens in 2005 and by Ireland in 2102. The Maastricht Recommendations were produced by the UN to advise pubic bodies and citizens on how to implement the Convention.

The Convention is transposed into Ireland by the Public Participation Directive, Article 6 of the SEA Directive and Article 6 of the EIA Directive. The protection of habitats is enshrined by the Habitats Directive. Protective costs orders for environmental Judicial Reviews are enshrined in Section 50 B of the Planning and development Act where the foregoing are invoked.

The Irish people voted for the EU having been promised in writing they would be given the benefit of these rights.

I know of no case where these rights were given freely, every advance so far made were made in the High Court, or on appeal to the Supreme court and where that failed in the CJEU. Planners receive no in service training on the implementation of these laws and in many cases did not know they existed.
 

valamhic

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What do you think is the bigger scam? Renewable energy or NIMBY objectors costing the state millions?
We gave our vote in exchange for these rights, that was the deal, now we see they reneged, they cheated. This is no more palatable to us than it was palatable for the Native Americans. Their fight is over, ours is not because we are a lot better equipped to oppose it.
 

valamhic

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Snobbery towards townies is part of of the reason for too much one off houses out the country. Couldn't bear living amongst the plebs in town. Not the only reason but still there.
There is no snobbery towards townies. I lived for a while in Dublin city centre. At that time the Fine Gael Coalition was elitist and Fianna Fail was not so elitist. The Dublin people voted for Fainna Fail. It halted Fine Gael for a while.

The hard fact is that the elitists have managed to wrestle control from the ordinary people who struggle to re-claim it. This is the source of the populist movement.
 

TweetyBird

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There is no snobbery towards townies. I lived for a while in Dublin city centre. At that time the Fine Gael Coalition was elitist and Fianna Fail was not so elitist. The Dublin people voted for Fainna Fail. It halted Fine Gael for a while.

The hard fact is that the elitists have managed to wrestle control from the ordinary people who struggle to re-claim it. This is the source of the populist movement.
To be more precise it's snobbery against living with an asses roar of social housing. It's the same sort of thing when persons in the suburbs, particularly south Dublin are up in arms over anything that's not more semi d's. I'm not having a go at rural ireland, I'm having a go a one off houses for every tom dick and harry who btw price locals out.
 

Schuhart

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Giving publicans VRT exemptions would help rural areas, says senator - Independent.ie

A Fine Gael senator has called for a Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT) exemption for publicans who carry customers home, in a move that could be worth around €2,200 for each vehicle.

Senator Joe O'Reilly has broken ranks to warn that people in rural Ireland have been made "prisoners in their own homes" by tougher drink-driving laws.
Are rural people comfortable with their public representatives depicting them as inveterate sots?
 

Round tower

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Giving publicans VRT exemptions would help rural areas, says senator - Independent.ie

A Fine Gael senator has called for a Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT) exemption for publicans who carry customers home, in a move that could be worth around €2,200 for each vehicle.

Senator Joe O'Reilly has broken ranks to warn that people in rural Ireland have been made "prisoners in their own homes" by tougher drink-driving laws


Are rural people comfortable with their public representatives depicting them as inveterate sots?
It would work during the week where it would be unlikely that alchol would be still in the blood in the morning but at weekends it would be, take a person get a taxi to the pub on a Friday, Sat. night and during Sunday, get a taxi home again, they could be still for drink driving in the morning say going to town on a Sat. or going to mass on Sunday, work on the Mon. morning. Heard of a case where a couple was going to town before Christmas, brought one of their cars, got a taxi home, the following day went in at 4pm to collect their car, the 2 of them was done for drink driving on the way home.
Heard of a young fella who was going into work one morning, he is a novice driver, it seems that the Nplates available have to be placed on the windscreen andwith sun and rain it can get discoloured and hard to see. So i gaurd said to him he needed 3 new tyres, if he went into the GS and stat he had got the tyres he would be OK, no problem, couple of days later he got a fine and 2 points for having no Nplate.
 

ergo2

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It makes sense to assist people to stay in rural Ireland - certainly in the towns - otherwise they end up clogging already overstretched cities with the inevitable result of traffic congestion, high living costs, social costs etc.

Skibbereen in West Cork is an example of where the provision of high speed broadband has transformed the business environment, retained jobs, created new jobs and provided a much better quality of life for those living there while reducing the stress on Cork city.

It's also a beautiful town with a stunning hinterland. Worth a bit of an effort imo.
I was in Cappoquin a couple of weeks ago on a rainy Thursday morning on my way back from Waterford. At first sight it looks as if nothing is happening. For starters it is a quaint little town with, in common with others, its fair share of vacant shops. A couple of tractors of varying antiquity chug past and there was the presence of a few ubiquitous white transit vans. The entrance to Cappoquin house and gardens looked as it could do with a tidy and lick of paint, and the back part of the town leading into the countryside had an almost 1930's feel. There is, however, an extremely good bakery in the centre of the town, with a modern style coffee shop attached - ah f#ck it, I'm probably breaking rules but I'll plug it :-



Its just that they have delicious cakes and if you have a sweet tooth be careful of its lures. Anyway I indulged in a coffee and the naive refreshment of a cream bun and the coffee shop was packed, humming with the rustic burr of cordial social intercourse - and, importantly, I discerned an upbeat atmosphere. It dawned on me that people get by, survive, and get on with things in Irish rural towns and they always have. I recall the early part of the eighties decade and it occurred to me that things were probably worse in rural Ireland than pertains at present. I'm afraid to say it but that I think that I might prefer somewhere like there than Dublin - and not just for the cream doughnuts..
Agree 100%
 

ergo2

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It makes sense to assist people to stay in rural Ireland - certainly in the towns - otherwise they end up clogging already overstretched cities with the inevitable result of traffic congestion, high living costs, social costs etc.

Skibbereen in West Cork is an example of where the provision of high speed broadband has transformed the business environment, retained jobs, created new jobs and provided a much better quality of life for those living there while reducing the stress on Cork city.

It's also a beautiful town with a stunning hinterland. Worth a bit of an effort imo.
Agreed. Also Westport
 

Clanrickard

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Are rural people comfortable with their public representatives depicting them as inveterate sots?
Yes which is why the likes of him are elected.
 


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