Salt Barns to be built nationwide but how will the final costs compare?

MsAnneThrope

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First of all let me say that credit should be given where credit is due. It looks like the extremely cold, icy weather that caught the country out so unprepared in late 2009/early 2010 has taught our officials to be better prepared this year. There would appear to be a concerted effort to ensure that salt barns are built in numerous locations around the country. Assuming these projects go ahead and the officials don't forget to actually stock their new barns with salt itself (take note lads) then we should be better prepared this winter.

What will be an interesting exercise at some point next year will be to review the final costs for each of these barns. Assuming the majority are of similar specification/size you'd expect the construction costs to be roughly equal at each location, wouldn't you? :)



To be continued...
 


jimmyfour

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This is like hospitals and clinics and schools. It's some jobs for the boys - the actual product of the construction as in keeping roads and thus local economy going, is irrelevant. It's a construction contract.
 

rubensni

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This is like hospitals and clinics and schools. It's some jobs for the boys - the actual product of the construction as in keeping roads and thus local economy going, is irrelevant. It's a construction contract.
It's not Nama, instead it's a bunch of domes to store salt to put on the road.

Everything has to be a conspiracy these days :(
 

asset test

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Well, in fairness, at least there is some forward planning here. For which we will all be grateful in the sub zero, snow ridden, pipe bursting, flooding potential disasters to come.

But like most, I wonder about the brown envelope syndrome too. We cannot be blamed for a bit of cynicism, now can we.

Opportunity knocks!
 

Dredger

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You would think that there would be plenty of empty warehouses around the country to put the stuff in.
 

MsAnneThrope

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You would think that there would be plenty of empty warehouses around the country to put the stuff in.
A search of Google Images suggests that Salt Barns come in all shapes, sizes and designs but I'm not sure if a regular, empty warehouse would do the job efficiently. I assume they need some specialised mechanisms and machinery for easy loading and unloading of large quantities of (heavy) salt, as opposed to some poor frozen soul with a rusty shovel and frostbite doing it manually. Plenty of council people post here so perhaps one who is familiar with the specifications will kindly elaborate.

I'd be more concerned with certain councils feeling the need to purchase a new site for the barn when they may be in possession of a suitable site or sites already. Hope they don't build on floodplains too!
 

spidermom

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Put the salt in with the e-voting machines...salt to rot machines(one job done)...salt stored at no extra cost(second job done)...and we have loads of salt for the roads...probably means a really mild winter on the way( third and last job complete!!)

:)
 
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Put the salt in with the e-voting machines...salt to rot machines(one job done)...salt stored at no extra cost(second job done)...and we have loads of salt for the roads...probably means a really mild winter on the way( third and last job complete!!)

:)
And if there is still salt left over they can use it to rub into the wounds not made sore enough by the budget. (another waste)
 

Stroke

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Salt barns won't be much help when we have floods at the end of this month. Strangely mild for this time of year, I'm expecting more rain if it continues....
 
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You would think that there would be plenty of empty warehouses around the country to put the stuff in.
Salt corrodes not surprisingly so why would anybody wish to rent out a warehouse that not surprisingly would be fit for nothing else afterwards.

In addition if you have seen Sky / BBC showing UK barns they have heavy machinery scooping up the stuff which does nothing for warehouse floors etc.

I would expect sites to be close to roads / motorways which some councils will not have.
 

Thac0man

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I have my doubts the Civil Service is capable of making adaquate preparation for any seriously cold winter, especially with expenditure already capped. Our government has already set the national agenda as keeping the Social Partners happy first and foremost. If they have to stay at home while the roads are iced over, the only plan the govenrment has sorted is the provision to pay them.

The effects of a bad winter on the economy may be dire at a crucial period though. Could be a very harsh winter followed by a very gloomy spring. At the very best the government and civil service will be looking for a pat on the back for doing their job adaquately. But we have less resources than we had last winter to throw about and whatever is spent on salt will come out of other council services budgets.
 

Sync

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Logical steps:
The emergency Committee (I forget their proper name) analyse the traffic flow from previous winter years and calculate how much salt is required per area, and where to place it.

engage in vendor selection for the barns.

Select a barn, install in a location. Ensure the barn is suitable for purpose.

Inform Council of locations for barns, ensure they're agreeable and that each barn is in a feasible location.

The Committee enter into a contract for 50 of these (Or however many required) and a seperate contract on the installations. Economies of scale and all that.

Install 5 of the barns in different areas. Test.

If successful roll out remaining 45.

Fill with salt.

Review council contracts for salts spreaders in order to offer a realistic costing structure for the future.

They will not manage to achieve this.
 
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Logical steps:
The emergency Committee (I forget their proper name) analyse the traffic flow from previous winter years and calculate how much salt is required per area, and where to place it.

engage in vendor selection for the barns.

Select a barn, install in a location. Ensure the barn is suitable for purpose.

Inform Council of locations for barns, ensure they're agreeable and that each barn is in a feasible location.

The Committee enter into a contract for 50 of these (Or however many required) and a seperate contract on the installations. Economies of scale and all that.

Install 5 of the barns in different areas. Test.

If successful roll out remaining 45.

Fill with salt.

Review council contracts for salts spreaders in order to offer a realistic costing structure for the future.

They will not manage to achieve this.
Great so wait 2 years until they are ready.
 

MsAnneThrope

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The first contract award for building the Salt Barns has been published, but the value of the contract has been "Withheld". This will make comparing the costs of respective centres nationwide tedious. South Dublin County Council awarded their contract to Pentico Contracting in Citywest at the end of October.

On further thought am I correct in thinking that our councils have been a bit late going out to tender? Is there any chance these barns will be built, stocked up and operational for this winter 2010-2011? The requests for tender were only issued in the second half of this year, with many only issued in August & September. By the time the tenders are received, the successful bidders selected and the construction completed surely it will be winter 2011/2012 before these will be operational? Why didn't they go out to tender in Feb or March of 2010, or by May/June at the latest?

If we're hit with another blast or two of arctic conditions, before this winter is over, could the country be caught out again?
 

consultant

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For many years, salt mills operated profitably in Ireland but declined during the late 19th early 20th centuries in the main.

Pity.
 

Casillas

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On further thought am I correct in thinking that our councils have been a bit late going out to tender? Is there any chance these barns will be built, stocked up and operational for this winter 2010-2011? The requests for tender were only issued in the second half of this year, with many only issued in August & September. By the time the tenders are received, the successful bidders selected and the construction completed surely it will be winter 2011/2012 before these will be operational? Why didn't they go out to tender in Feb or March of 2010, or by May/June at the latest?

If we're hit with another blast or two of arctic conditions, before this winter is over, could the country be caught out again?
Have to agree with you that the timing is dreadful, I don't see why this couldn't have been done over the Summer. Is it because people were on holidays?!
 


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