Sam Bowman: the Corkman who is making the traditional right relevant again.

O

Oscurito

The world "Alt" might mean "old" in German but when it prefixes the word "Right", it seems to mean "new" these days. It's hard for the "older" right to compete with the brash theatrics of the likes of Milo Yiannopoulos and it's noticeable how much the latter has been getting all the attention of late.

The meat and potatoes topics for the more traditional right such as the Adam Smith Institute are economic issues: regulation of business, competitiveness, socioeconomic equality, role of the state, taxes etc. For right-wing millennials - especially those who feel they don't have much stake in the economy - these are complex, dry topics and the attraction of another more simplistic identity-oriented ideology where you get to use daringly non-PC terms for African-Americans and lesbians can be much greater.

Step forward one Sam Bowman, political theorist, economist and still very much a twenty-something from Cork (that's 5 years younger than the aforementioned Milo) who has already become the executive director of the Adam Smith Institute. He's been pretty much ignored in the Irish media but is regularly quoted and sought out for interviews in the UK.

His views on governance and economics are traditional right-wing ones: deregulation of business, boosting of competitiveness - perhaps with less emphasis on socioeconomic equality, a reduced role for the state, lower taxes etc. You may disagree with his views but his ability to deliver them in a concise way is getting attention. Humour is important too and a recent comment of his on Jeremy Corbyn's (not very well thought out) proposals on CEO pay to the effect that "the law of gravity isn't fair either" will have brought smiles to more than a few faces.

Have a look below at a recent interview on Newsnight - again on the thorny issue of executive pay. I'm not totally convinced by his arguments but he brought facts and opinions to bear on the debate that I personally hadn't heard before.

His Twitter feed indicates that he's hedging his bets on Trump although in this blog post (brought to my attention by the user Mulligan), he makes some extremely critical comments about the orange-haired one.

Bowman wouldn't be a fan of tariffs or economic nationalism. He also deviated from the British right-wing consensus that was against Scottish independence. You don't have to agree with everything he says but I'll take his rational fact-based analyses over the name-calling and hand-flapping histrionics of the alt-right any day.

[video=youtube;8trpQLdnHtU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8trpQLdnHtU[/video]
 
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Analyzer

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Don't worry.

Prof Brian Lucey ( "I would invest in Anglo Irish bank shares right now solid investment" ) will be foaming at the mouth, & will soon express outrage, at anybody from Cork propose this economics perspective.

I am sure his perspective on Ireland's largesse ridden, bailout every cause, vote buying oversized institutional state will also prove interesting.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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In fairness for a young Irishman to argue for deregulation of 'red tape' (ie allow us to cross the border into what was previously criminality without penalty) he'd have to do it abroad.

Mind you Sam would have been fifteen in 2007 so the effects of low to zero regulation in Ireland may not have played as high a role in his awareness at the time as the worry whether girls would like his dick or not.

The study of economics used to be regarded as a strand of education with the School of History or at best Philosophy in the better educational establishments.

It all went a bit tits up when Economists decided to move their profession entirely into the School of Philosophy and each were issued with a long robe with black swans on it and crystal balls.

I've an economic rule which has proven historically accurate for Sam. De-regulation in business always in the end results in corporate criminality and the unrelenting pursuit of market share to cartelism to monopoly and none of those are in the interest of either consumer or voter.
 

Amnesiac

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In fairness for a young Irishman to argue for deregulation of 'red tape' (ie allow us to cross the border into what was previously criminality without penalty) he'd have to do it abroad.

Mind you Sam would have been fifteen in 2007 so the effects of low to zero regulation in Ireland may not have played as high a role in his awareness at the time as the worry whether girls would like his dick or not.

The study of economics used to be regarded as a strand of education with the School of History or at best Philosophy in the better educational establishments.

It all went a bit tits up when Economists decided to move their profession entirely into the School of Philosophy and each were issued with a long robe with black swans on it and crystal balls.

I've an economic rule which has proven historically accurate for Sam. De-regulation in business always in the end results in corporate criminality and the unrelenting pursuit of market share to cartelism to monopoly and none of those are in the interest of either consumer or voter.
I'm sure Sam would say that not all regulations are alike. Incumbent corporations benefit from some regulations like licensing and compliance costs which work to stifle competition from new companies. I will admit ignorance of any systematic study on this issue, but I suspect it is really the impact of these new firms which dislodges established corporate power. Major corporations are happy to use the state to re-enforce their position.
 
O

Oscurito

Don't worry.

Prof Brian Lucey ( "I would invest in Anglo Irish bank shares right now solid investment" ) will be foaming at the mouth, & will soon express outrage, at anybody from Cork propose this economics perspective.

I am sure his perspective on Ireland's largesse ridden, bailout every cause, vote buying oversized institutional state will also prove interesting.
Surely Cork is big enough for two schools of economic thought? :cool:

I'll have a root around and see if he's written or said anything about it.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I'm sure Sam would say that not all regulations are alike. Incumbent corporations benefit from some regulations like licensing and compliance costs which work to stifle competition from new companies. I will admit ignorance of any systematic study on this issue, but I suspect it is really the impact of these new firms which dislodges established corporate power. Major corporations are happy to use the state to re-enforce their position.
I'm sure Sam would. I'm equally sure he would avoid a phrase that was popularly in vogue with the Adam Smith Institute's staff which was 'the trickle-down economy'.

IE take the brakes off the wealthy and their sociopathic ways of propping up their own egos with wealth will surely benefit the nation. Or it would do if they ever intended to do anything other than avoid contributing to the civil life of the nation by avoiding tax at all costs.

The trickle down theory became a leaky guttering problem.
 
O

Oscurito

Don't worry.

Prof Brian Lucey ( "I would invest in Anglo Irish bank shares right now solid investment" ) will be foaming at the mouth, & will soon express outrage, at anybody from Cork propose this economics perspective.

I am sure his perspective on Ireland's largesse ridden, bailout every cause, vote buying oversized institutional state will also prove interesting.
He gave the bailout a big thumbs-down and said that the UK should have no part in it.
https://www.adamsmith.org/news/response-to-ireland-s-confirmed-application-for-a-bailout
https://www.adamsmith.org/blog/international/britain-should-have-no-part-in-an-irish-bailout

He also said that it would fail and that we should be leaving the eurozone and was sceptical that the program would work.
Ireland's austerity programme was bogus - Telegraph

So he's not been totally correct but he was only 22 when he wrote that.
 
O

Oscurito

In fairness for a young Irishman to argue for deregulation of 'red tape' (ie allow us to cross the border into what was previously criminality without penalty) he'd have to do it abroad.

Mind you Sam would have been fifteen in 2007 so the effects of low to zero regulation in Ireland may not have played as high a role in his awareness at the time as the worry whether girls would like his dick or not.

The study of economics used to be regarded as a strand of education with the School of History or at best Philosophy in the better educational establishments.

It all went a bit tits up when Economists decided to move their profession entirely into the School of Philosophy and each were issued with a long robe with black swans on it and crystal balls.

I've an economic rule which has proven historically accurate for Sam. De-regulation in business always in the end results in corporate criminality and the unrelenting pursuit of market share to cartelism to monopoly and none of those are in the interest of either consumer or voter.
Maybe I should have said less regulation as opposed to deregulation. After all, if there's complete deregulation then there's not much - apart from what's forbidden by Common Law - that could be regarded as criminal.

Again, I'd need to do some googling but I'd imagine he'd take the line that people who do stupid things should face the full rigours of the free market. In the case of Ireland, the corporate sector got the best of every world while the ordinary folks got the worst.

Big business broke all the rules and got rescued by the taxpayer. In a properly functioning free market, Seán Fitzpatrick would be queuing up to claim his job seeker's allowance alongside those whose lives he ruined.
 

Mercurial

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To whom is he making "the traditional right" relevant?

Or he just supposed to be interesting because he is unusally young to have sold his soul to the pseudo-libertarian right?
 
O

Oscurito

To whom is he making "the traditional right" relevant?

Or he just supposed to be interesting because he is unusally young to have sold his soul to the pseudo-libertarian right?
Relevant to everyone. Whether or not you like, this guy will be changing hearts and minds.

And he's interesting to me because he's Irish and clearly has talent, knowledge and eloquence far beyond his years and has had a rapid rise in a field that tends to be dominated by far older men. It's not called the dismal science for nothing.

I'm glad to see that the lynch mob hasn't caught up with you yet.

 

Mercurial

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Relevant to everyone. Whether or not you like, this guy will be changing hearts and minds.

And he's interesting to me because he's Irish and clearly has talent, knowledge and eloquence far beyond his years and has had a rapid rise in a field that tends to be dominated by far older men. It's not called the dismal science for nothing.

I'm glad to see that the lynch mob hasn't caught up with you yet.


I agree with you to an extent (though I think the fact that the ideas he endorses are mostly wrong should inform our assessment of him).

I don't see any evidence that he (and to be fair, this isn't an issue with him in particular, but with commentators in general) actually has (or will have) any influence on the opinions of ordinary people.
 

mulligan

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His Twitter feed indicates that he's hedging his bets on Trump. He wouldn't be a fan of tariffs or economic nationalism. He also deviated from the British right-wing consensus that was against Scottish independence. You don't have to agree with everything he says but I'll take his rational fact-based analyses over the name-calling and hand-flapping histrionics of the alt-right any day.
Pretty fawning post over this fella you have there. Speaking of name calling this is his recent blog piece.

To be clear, I am very disappointed that Trump won. His victory probably is, to some extent, a rejection of free trade and immigration, and anyone who believes in these things should be horrified. Trump himself is a horrible man: an erratic, racist misogynist who has courted and won the support of straight-up neo-Nazis. And his pro-Russian foreign policy is extremely worrying if Putin continues to aggress against the Baltic states. Perversely, these things may have been great strengths for him – proof that he was not part of the politically correct establishment.
https://www.adamsmith.org/blog/the-upside-of-trump

Maybe this is the crux of why you seem enchanted by this individual. He is not nearly as relevant as you seem to believe. Neo Liberalism has had it's day, in reality your time is up.
 
O

Oscurito

I agree with you to an extent (though I think the fact that the ideas he endorses are mostly wrong should inform our assessment of him).

I don't see any evidence that he (and to be fair, this isn't an issue with him in particular, but with commentators in general) actually has (or will have) any influence on the opinions of ordinary people.
The likes of Sam Bowman influences the influencers. That's the kind of level he operates at. I wouldn't be surprised to see some quotes from him appearing in a Conservative party document in the next year or two.

It's not so much that the Tories need to be convinced by his arguments: it's that he gives them the words to justify the policies they'd want to implement anyway - handy bite-sized quotes that will fit into a tabloid headline or a Sky News interview.
 

Mercurial

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The likes of Sam Bowman influences the influencers. That's the kind of level he operates at. I wouldn't be surprised to see some quotes from him appearing in a Conservative party document in the next year or two.

It's not so much that the Tories need to be convinced by his arguments: it's that he gives them the words to justify the policies they'd want to implement anyway - handy bite-sized quotes that will fit into a tabloid headline or a Sky News interview.
You might have a point there. A friend of mine has done policy work for the Tories and it does seem to be a case of providing them with the ideological dressing even though the politicians themselves don't necessarily know much, or care much, about the technicalities.
 
O

Oscurito

Pretty fawning post over this fella you have there. Speaking of name calling this is his recent blog piece.



https://www.adamsmith.org/blog/the-upside-of-trump

Maybe this is the crux of why you seem enchanted by this individual. He is not nearly as relevant as you seem to believe. Neo Liberalism has had it's day, in reality your time is up.
Wow.....!

Okay....first things first. I'm not pursuing a hidden agenda. I can swear on every bible in Ballymena that I didn't see that blog. I did have some inkling that Bowman would disapprove of Trump's economic ideas but I thought he might be agnostic on some other aspects of Trump's behavior. Clearly, that's wrong and I shall amend the OP.

On the more substantive point, the idea that Trump is going to usher in some new economic golden era is just too ridiculous for words. Trump is not ant-neoliberalism; he'll be neoliberal if it suits him.

In reality, Trump doesn't give a flying long term f__k for any -ism apart from Trumpism - the basic tenets of which are the maximizing of wealth, power and self-gratification (preferably instantaneous) of one Donald J Trump.
 

Dr Pat

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Wow.....!

Okay....first things first. I'm not pursuing a hidden agenda. I can swear on every bible in Ballymena that I didn't see that blog. I did have some inkling that Bowman would disapprove of Trump's economic ideas but I thought he might be agnostic on some other aspects of Trump's behavior. Clearly, that's wrong and I shall amend the OP.

On the more substantive point, the idea that Trump is going to usher in some new economic golden era is just too ridiculous for words. Trump is not ant-neoliberalism; he'll be neoliberal if it suits him.

In reality, Trump doesn't give a flying long term f__k for any -ism apart from Trumpism - the basic tenets of which are the maximizing of wealth, power and self-gratification (preferably instantaneous) of one Donald J Trump.
That's a very jaundiced view of the Donald. As to this lad, from that interview, struck me more as just another young wannabe executive apparatchik who no doubt will do well in life and good luck to him in that journey, not that I would agree with all of his views.
 

mulligan

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Wow.....!

Okay....first things first. I'm not pursuing a hidden agenda. I can swear on every bible in Ballymena that I didn't see that blog. I did have some inkling that Bowman would disapprove of Trump's economic ideas but I thought he might be agnostic on some other aspects of Trump's behavior. Clearly, that's wrong and I shall amend the OP.

On the more substantive point, the idea that Trump is going to usher in some new economic golden era is just too ridiculous for words. Trump is not ant-neoliberalism; he'll be neoliberal if it suits him.

In reality, Trump doesn't give a flying long term f__k for any -ism apart from Trumpism - the basic tenets of which are the maximizing of wealth, power and self-gratification (preferably instantaneous) of one Donald J Trump.
Listen a quick google search of this Bowman character says everything. Here's another beauty:

[video=youtube;3tgWBlDIYts]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tgWBlDIYts[/video]

Comments underneath say it all. Give me your enemies Trump and Milo all day over this guy. Lastly and I won't waste anymore time on this. There is a deep irony in a well paid Irish immigrant in Britain telling poor British people they need to accept even more immigration. No they don't, totally wrong on that issue.
 
O

Oscurito

That's a very jaundiced view of the Donald. As to this lad, from that interview, struck me more as just another young wannabe executive apparatchik who no doubt will do well in life and good luck to him in that journey, not that I would agree with all of his views.
It is but the guy is no idealist and some people are saying far far worse.
 


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