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SDLP choose Patsy McGlone to stand against SF's Francie Molloy in Mid-Ulster.


theloner

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SDLP Mid-Ulster MLA Patsy McGlone has been selected as the party’s candidate for the Mid-Ulster Westminster by-election. He said in Cookstown last night:

“As a proud Constitutional Irish Republican, and one who stands for an Ireland united in accommodation and respect, I will not run away from representing Mid-Ulster where and when I have to'.

McGlone is also MLA for Mid-Ulster, indeed his electioneering team were targeted by loyalists only two years ago when he was out canvassing. Their electioneering car was petrol bombed by loyalists in Coagh. McGlone is also former deputy leader of the SDLP and actually stood against the bold Margo Richtie in 2011, attempting to become leader of the party.

SDLP boss, McDonnell said of McGlone and the SDLP, 'Now, Patsy offers Mid Ulster a New Deal – taking the battle to Westminster to fight for control of our own economic destiny so we can deliver sustainable jobs, grow the local private sector, protect public services and, for the first time in over 15 years, promising a strong Irish voice as MP for Mid-Ulster''.

He'll be up against veretan republican who survived a SF suspension in 2005 after he disagreed with the party leadership over the reduction of the number of district councils. Molloy who is currently deputy speaker of the Assembly, was director of operations for Vol. Bobby Sands when he won the Fermanagh and South Tyrone seat in 1981. After the death of Sands, Molloy did the same role for Owen Carron, who also won the seat.

Mid Ulster will elect a republican MP. It will probably be Francie Molloy, but does the SDLP have a trick up its sleeve or will this be an election of consolidation of votes to build upon?

Unionist Willie Frazer is also rumoured to be standing for the seat.

McGlone selected by SDLP for Mid Ulster by-election - Latest - Belfast Newsletter
 
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theloner

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What is the difference between director of operations and election agent?
Not sure. Read that term in the Tele (I think).
 

meriwether

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Yep - Not really important in itself - I just remember that Carron was Sands' election agent and presumed that was the same as director of operations.
D.o.E. sounds far grander.

Thats probably the difference.
 

Aristodemus

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Good luck to him. I'm sure that constituency does not need another absentee MP
 

Glaucon

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Good luck to him. I'm sure that constituency does not need another absentee MP
It makes absolutely no difference. An MP at Westminster from either the SDLP or Sinn Féin will not be listened to, unless in the event of a hung parliament, which is resolutely not the case now.

NI MPs have zero impact or influence at Westminster, unless under very specific circumstances. Their power is even less than Ireland's MEPs in Brussels (at least they are part of bigger, Europe-wide parties). At least with local rule, some sort of power can be exercised, under direct rule, NI politicians had as much influence as North Dakota had before they acceded to statehood.
 
J

Johnny Boy

It makes absolutely no difference. An MP at Westminster from either the SDLP or Sinn Féin will not be listened to, unless in the event of a hung parliament, which is resolutely not the case now.

NI MPs have zero impact or influence at Westminster, unless under very specific circumstances. Their power is even less than Ireland's MEPs in Brussels (at least they are part of bigger, Europe-wide parties). At least with local rule, some sort of power can be exercised, under direct rule, NI politicians had as much influence as North Dakota had before they acceded to statehood.
Not true. John Hume had more influence there than any unionist.
 

Just Jack

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Not true. John Hume had more influence there than any unionist.
Hume was a great politican though. There are none like him about these days.
 

Dame_Enda

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Looks like the SDLP are finally recognising that Castle Catholicism (at least West of the Bann) won't cut it with Nationalist voters. Ironically, that part of the North is probably less divided along sectarian lines though.
 

DT123

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Looks like the SDLP are finally recognising that Castle Catholicism (at least West of the Bann) won't cut it with Nationalist voters. Ironically, that part of the North is probably less divided along sectarian lines though.
What does this mean?
 

Glaucon

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Not true. John Hume had more influence there than any unionist.
John Hume had influence (and was a great statesman, possibly the greatest Ireland has produced since Dev). However, his influence was constricted to events pertaining to Northern Ireland, and even then it had its limits. In relation to broad British economic, social, or foreign policy, any Northern Ireland MP matters not a whit. Hume had a long, hard slog to reach the apogee of his influence in the early to mid 1990s; from the late 60s through the 80s, his was a long, lonely path.

The only opportunity Ulster MPs ever have to exercise any influence is when there is a near hung parliament and the government of the day is dependent on their votes. The old Irish Parliamentary Party excelled at this, but even with 100 or so MPs, their efficacy was not total. 18 MPs out of 650 are a drop in the vast Westminster ocean. Meaningless, really.
 
J

Johnny Boy

John Hume had influence (and was a great statesman, possibly the greatest Ireland has produced since Dev). However, his influence was constricted to events pertaining to Northern Ireland, and even then it had its limits. In relation to broad British economic, social, or foreign policy, any Northern Ireland MP matters not a whit. Hume had a long, hard slog to reach the apogee of his influence in the early to mid 1990s; from the late 60s through the 80s, his was a long, lonely path.
Personally I'd rank him with Daniel O'Connell. Dev was a hero to my father, but not to me, as it happens. He did have a struggle but he single-handedly created the climate for talks when Reynolds and Major hadn't the balls or the imaginaation to be anything other than the sly dullards that allowed them to be promoted beyond their payscales.

The only opportunity Ulster MPs ever have to exercise any influence is when there is a near hung parliament and the government of the day is dependent on their votes. The old Irish Parliamentary Party excelled at this, but even with 100 or so MPs, their efficacy was not total. 18 MPs out of 650 are a drop in the vast Westminster ocean. Meaningless, really.
That happened briefly in 1974, and again very briefly in 1979. The concessions they won during thos spells were so meaningless that I'd guess that very few people could even remember what they were.
 

Dame_Enda

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What does this mean?
I mean that West of the Bann, Protestants are used to being minorities in overwhelmingly Catholic areas, and therefore more social interaction between them occurs than East of the Bann. Hence the hate is perhaps not as widespread in the former.

Evidence might include Ken Maginnis, who was considered a moderate (on the Peace Process) and was elected in F-ST.
 

IrishWelshCelt

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Molloy will romp it.
 
C

Castle Ray

I mean that West of the Bann, Protestants are used to being minorities in overwhelmingly Catholic areas, and therefore more social interaction between them occurs than East of the Bann. Hence the hate is perhaps not as widespread in the former.

Evidence might include Ken Maginnis, who was considered a moderate (on the Peace Process) and was elected in F-ST.
Tom Elliott's description of Sinn Fein is a pretty consistent viewpoint for Unionists in every corner of NI.
 
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