Secession - an American value

Deadlock

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The thing with the US is that it's fairly close to the Swiss model. There are elections and propositions every flipping year. The smallest of positions (relatively, of course) all the way up to the highest ones are all elected offices.

There's the different levels starting with

City: mayors, councilmen and women, city court judges etc.
County: Board of supervisors, circuit judges, sheriff, tax collectors, school boards, utility districts etc.
State: Governor, Lieutenant Gov, AG, Insurance Commissioner, State representatives and State Senators, Judges.
Federal: Congressional and General elections.

All of these tiers of government can be both good and bad. Sometimes, it means that decisions at a local level can be made efficiently and effectively, but there will sometimes be extra clearance needed from the next tier up. The further up the tiers one goes, the more inefficient and ineffective the decisions appear - certainly to the average Joe Sixpack.

The division, or polarization as it's perceived has more to do with what is realistically a two party system. There are four sides:

-Them
-Us
-A bit of both (the floating voter)
-Who cares

The eleven nations described in the OP won't really address this. The divisions run right down the middle of towns and villages and megalopolises and country roads.

What happened this time last year was down to people being pissed off at the government. Imposition of new taxes, and fees, and mandates, with no perceived benefits, and folks losing full time jobs to part time ones or automation, leading to smaller paychecks and eventually anger, and a type of revolution which ultimately led to electing Trump.

The other suggestion made, that people of similar ideological persuasions would flock together, is a nonsense. People go where they can afford to go. Economics are what forces them together. No jobs in Skehana, move to Tuam. No jobs in Tuam, Galway. Galway - Dublin. Then on to foreign shores. Costs of living go up, but so do prospects, until eventually you find a place where you are comfortable and can afford to live and settle down.

Magical lines on a map won't create harmony or prosperity. Maybe they did in the past, but in the last forty years or so, the world has shrunk, and the lines have become increasingly blurred. The only ones that matter nowadays are the big regional ones.

Edit: apologies for a rather meandering post.
Thanks for a very interesting reply Carlos. I agree that lines on maps solve nothing at all mid- to long-term, but I confess the megaregion concept was one that interested me a very great deal, and the rationale of applying both economic and social support to cities to iron out inequality of opportunity and access seems both elegant and attractive.
 


Man or Mouse

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Hell no! Have you seen my OP!
I did and it was interesting. Secede was a popular theme on Texas bumper stickers years ago. Don't know how they're feeling these days, but I'm sure the esteem in which they hold themselves hasn't changed much.

The red/blue map on the OP reminds me of a Bill Maher sketch about the city mouse v the country mouse. All the pockets of blue in the middle of red states are cities for the most part with that section of Texas from around Corpus to Brownsville is very Hispanic. Was big LBJ country back in the day an did every bit as much as Mayor Daly in Chicago to get Kennedy elected.
 
D

Deleted member 48908

Thanks for a very interesting reply Carlos. I agree that lines on maps solve nothing at all mid- to long-term, but I confess the megaregion concept was one that interested me a very great deal, and the rationale of applying both economic and social support to cities to iron out inequality of opportunity and access seems both elegant and attractive.
Here's a map from the 1760s showing a megaregion:



West Florida is certainly an area where a majority of people would share a relatively common ideology, politically and socially. Trouble was, it meant that coastal Alabama, Mississippi and New Orleans were cut off from the rest of their state. Those areas of those states are economic powerhouses and certainly, in the case of Mississippi, the biggest driver of their entire economy.

Another map I literally just saw elsewhere...



There are more people living in LA County than live in each of those 41 states.

Kinda gives some perspective on megaregions in the US. It also dovetails nicely with some of my shortlist for secession candidates up the thread.
 
D

Deleted member 48908

I did and it was interesting. Secede was a popular theme on Texas bumper stickers years ago. Don't know how they're feeling these days, but I'm sure the esteem in which they hold themselves hasn't changed much.

The red/blue map on the OP reminds me of a Bill Maher sketch about the city mouse v the country mouse. All the pockets of blue in the middle of red states are cities for the most part with that section of Texas from around Corpus to Brownsville is very Hispanic. Was big LBJ country back in the day an did every bit as much as Mayor Daly in Chicago to get Kennedy elected.
Texans still really love them some Texans.
 

Man or Mouse

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Texans still really love them some Texans.
So probably also, them cowboy boots, ten gallon hats, pickup trucks and Lone Star, not necessarily in that order.

Not much has changed so. Pet hate still Yankees? petunia
 

DexterGreen22

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Can't see any states leaving soon. The UK is a lot more divided and Belfast or Edinburgh have yet to leave.

There's more support in Scotland and the North for leaving the union than there is for California, Texas or South Carolina leaving the US.

Glasgow, Scotland's largest city, voted to leave the UK. Would Houston or LA* vote to leave the US?

There's no US equivalent to West Belfast or South Armagh, where the population have viewed Britain as an occupying power and don't see themselves as the least bit British. Pretty much everyone in Cali, Texas and every other state see themselves as American.


*I don't think it's unrealistic to say some Hispanics in southern California would want to be governed by Mexico City than Washington and if they get the numbers it could cause the Americans trouble. Reconquista.
 

eoghanacht

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I don't see an option for Spencer's ethnic white state?
 
D

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So probably also, them cowboy boots, ten gallon hats, pickup trucks and Lone Star, not necessarily in that order.

Not much has changed so. Pet hate still Yankees? petunia
Yankee has morphed into non-Texans.
 

GDPR

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Can't see any states leaving soon. The UK is a lot more divided and Belfast or Edinburgh have yet to leave.

There's more support in Scotland and the North for leaving the union than there is for California, Texas or South Carolina leaving the US.

Glasgow, Scotland's largest city, voted to leave the UK. Would Houston or LA* vote to leave the US?

There's no US equivalent to West Belfast or South Armagh, where the population have viewed Britain as an occupying power and don't see themselves as the least bit British. Pretty much everyone in Cali, Texas and every other state see themselves as American.


*I don't think it's unrealistic to say some Hispanics in southern California would want to be governed by Mexico City than Washington and if they get the numbers it could cause the Americans trouble. Reconquista.
I think the Hispanics in southern California would be greatly outnumbered by Hispanics wanting to go to and/or stay in the USA. The southern Californian Hispanics you mention can easily move south of the border - it's not far :)
 

kerdasi amaq

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Can the US military restrain themselves from taking sides in a political dispute?
 


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