Senator Fergal Quinn - RIP

Ardillaun

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
11,660
I don’t recall an Irish businessman who is more fondly remembered by those who met him. He seems to have gone out of his way to brighten everybody’s day.
 


Pabilito

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2008
Messages
5,616
From a post on facebook

A member of the Irish Capitalist class passes away and the sycophants are out in force. Yes, he created employment when Ireland was in the midst of '80s recession. The jobs were exploitative and low paid. I started on 50p an hour. At one stage we had to wear sweatshirts with the words "No tips please, your custom is our reward" emblazoned on the front and back. Bullying within the workforce was prevalent when I worked there. There were no procedures to deal with it. As a man he was pleasant enough. He knew every member of staff by name and once caught me out wearing someone else's name badge. He damaged An Post when he took over as director and it became a semi-state body. Working conditions deteriorated. As senator I think the only memorable thing he did was to bring a Bill to stop Irish Water from demanding PPS numbers from "customers".

Dredging the murky depths as usual to find something negative about a good person..

My brother with special needs is a Superquinn\Supervalue employee of almost 30 years,.. ironically he was always very proud of having Fergal Quinn as a Facebook friend who never failed to check in with him from time to time and wish him a happy birthday.
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,193
From a post on facebook

A member of the Irish Capitalist class passes away and the sycophants are out in force. Yes, he created employment when Ireland was in the midst of '80s recession. The jobs were exploitative and low paid. I started on 50p an hour. At one stage we had to wear sweatshirts with the words "No tips please, your custom is our reward" emblazoned on the front and back. Bullying within the workforce was prevalent when I worked there. There were no procedures to deal with it. As a man he was pleasant enough. He knew every member of staff by name and once caught me out wearing someone else's name badge. He damaged An Post when he took over as director and it became a semi-state body. Working conditions deteriorated. As senator I think the only memorable thing he did was to bring a Bill to stop Irish Water from demanding PPS numbers from "customers".
I worked for Superquinn too. The pay was sh1t, but I was 16 and it was a summer job, and I learned a lot from it - and I certainly didn't go in with the sense of entitlement evident in the Facebook post you've quoted.
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,193
Dredging the murky depths as usual to find something negative about a good person..

My brother with special needs is a Superquinn\Supervalue employee of almost 30 years,.. ironically he was always very proud of having Fergal Quinn as a Facebook friend who never failed to check in with him from time to time and wish him a happy birthday.
Good point, Superquinn were one of very few employers who took on special needs people back then.
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,193
Quinn did a hatchet job on the postal service.
In what way? Last time I looked it was as good as ever, and probably better. Punctuality of delivery is certainly way better now.
 

Ardillaun

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
11,660
In 1993, he chaired a Department of Education steering committee which overhauled a key component of the post- primary education system. He donated his Seanad salary to charity up until the crash and then declined to take it at all after that.

He chaired An Post from 1979 and spent 10 years helping to modernise the postal system and was instrumental in setting up the National Lottery.

Feargal Quinn was the real deal - a hugely successful business figure who pioneered innovation in his own sector; a person who gave back to the State; who carried a sense of civic responsibility and national pride and was a champion of the little guy.

 

Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
11,216
Twitter
Deiscirt
From a post on facebook

A member of the Irish Capitalist class passes away and the sycophants are out in force. Yes, he created employment when Ireland was in the midst of '80s recession. The jobs were exploitative and low paid. I started on 50p an hour. At one stage we had to wear sweatshirts with the words "No tips please, your custom is our reward" emblazoned on the front and back. Bullying within the workforce was prevalent when I worked there. There were no procedures to deal with it. As a man he was pleasant enough. He knew every member of staff by name and once caught me out wearing someone else's name badge. He damaged An Post when he took over as director and it became a semi-state body. Working conditions deteriorated. As senator I think the only memorable thing he did was to bring a Bill to stop Irish Water from demanding PPS numbers from "customers".
You people are a plague on the rest of us. You do know that right? Scowling, bitter, ungrateful, self-entitled, grasping, sour-pussed, narrow-minded, parochial, perpetually whinging hurlers on the ditch. Quinn was an exceptional Irish man and by all accounts a fair, decent and hard working man.
 

Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
11,216
Twitter
Deiscirt
In what way? Last time I looked it was as good as ever, and probably better. Punctuality of delivery is certainly way better now.
You can imagine how much in dire need P&T was in need of an Augean cleaning out in 1979? 50 years of state-funded nepotism, unionization and apathy.
 

Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
11,216
Twitter
Deiscirt
Quinn did a hatchet job on the postal service.
Ah yes. How we all hanker for blazing efficiency, productivity and sheer elan of the Irish Post Office circa 1979.
 

making waves

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Messages
19,277
Ah yes. How we all hanker for blazing efficiency, productivity and sheer elan of the Irish Post Office circa 1979.
The Irish postal system was starved of any funding for decades. In the run up to the splitting of Posts and Telegraphs in 1984 the government pumped more than £700million into Telecom to make it juicy for privatisation - An Post was supposed to get the same amount - it didn't get a penny. Instead Quinn took a hatchet to the postal service - and it still hasn't recovered.
 

Northsideman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2010
Messages
9,620
The Irish postal system was starved of any funding for decades. In the run up to the splitting of Posts and Telegraphs in 1984 the government pumped more than £700million into Telecom to make it juicy for privatisation - An Post was supposed to get the same amount - it didn't get a penny. Instead Quinn took a hatchet to the postal service - and it still hasn't recovered.
People could see the way things were going, Snail Mail was going to die and it has, the future for An Post if there is one is as a parcel delivery service, a state subsidised sub contractor for Amazon and the likes.
 

making waves

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Messages
19,277
People could see the way things were going, Snail Mail was going to die and it has, the future for An Post if there is one is as a parcel delivery service, a state subsidised sub contractor for Amazon and the likes.
Come off it - the internet didn't even exist in 1984. The government had an opportunity to modernise the postal system post-1984 but didn't put a penny into the company. Ireland is one of the few countries on the planet that doesn't have a subsidised postal service (and that includes privatised systems). The UK government subsidises the privatised UK postal service to the tune of £370million a year. The US postal service receives $18billion in subsidies every year.

The government had an opportunity to invest and modernise An Post in 1984 - instead they installed Quinn and he went on a binge of slashing jobs and services - and the Irish postal service has never recovered.

(and by the way - Northsideman - George Orwell never made the quote you attribute to him)
 
Last edited:

Northsideman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2010
Messages
9,620
Come off it - the internet didn't even exist in 1984. The government had an opportunity to modernise the postal system post-1984 but didn't put a penny into the company. Ireland is one of the few countries on the planet that doesn't have a subsidised postal service (and that includes privatised systems). The UK government subsidises the privatised UK postal service to the tune of £370million a year. The US postal service receives $18billion in subsidies every year.

The government had an opportunity to invest and modernise An Post in 1984 - instead they installed Quinn and he went on a binge of slashing jobs and services - and the Irish postal service has never recovered.

(and by the way - Northsideman - George Orwell never made the quote you attribute to him)
Where did I mention the internet? I said people could see the end of snail mail, Quinn was I'm sure one of these. Why would anyone pump money into a service than was one the way out. What recovery could there be for An Post? What do you envisage it could be? Theres alot of nostalgic sh!te about it but it ain't a social service it can either exist as a delivery service or it can't. Like I said it's future is now little more than Amazon's delivery service.
 

making waves

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Messages
19,277
Where did I mention the internet? I said people could see the end of snail mail, Quinn was I'm sure one of these. Why would anyone pump money into a service than was one the way out. What recovery could there be for An Post? What do you envisage it could be? Theres alot of nostalgic sh!te about it but it ain't a social service it can either exist as a delivery service or it can't. Like I said it's future is now little more than Amazon's delivery service.
This is serious bullsh*t - and clearly you weren't around in 1984 to have any idea what was going on - I worked in the post office in 1984 and did so for another 20 years. The company was riddled with incompetent management - incompetent management under the watch of Fergal Quinn.

The postal service is a social service - it does a lot more than just deliver mail - and it has a universal service obligation. Like in all public services the private sector has been allowed to cherry-pick the most profitable parts of the postal system and An Post has been left to carry the can for the rest of the service. Furthermore - I notice that you completely ignored the fact that most postal services on the planet - both public and privatised - receive massive state subsidies - An Post has never received a penny - the absence of state funding and ongoing subsidies has resulted in people like Quinn hacking the postal system to bits and slashing jobs and services. The demise of the postal system has been predicted for more than two decades - yet mail volumes continue to at high levels - parcel delivery continues to expand and there are countless other services the post office could provide - except the government doesn't want it competing with its friends in the private sector.
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,618
I worked for Superquinn too. The pay was sh1t, but I was 16 and it was a summer job, and I learned a lot from it - and I certainly didn't go in with the sense of entitlement evident in the Facebook post you've quoted.
I worked in Superquinn for around a year when I was in school. The pay was crap as you said but almost the same as Quinnsworth at the time (Quinnsworth was a few pence less). I remember remarking to someone at the the time that an hours work in the place (I was of course on the lowest level) only equated to the price of a pint. In hindsight if I was that age again at that time I wouldn't have worked for a job paying that level of money even at that age given the amount of money we teenagers spent on the weekend. An hours work for the price of a pint looking back on it? No way! :)
 
Last edited:

making waves

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Messages
19,277
I worked in Superquinn for around a year when I was in school. The pay was crap as you said but almost the same as Quinnsworth at the time (Quinnsworth was a few pence less). I remember remarking to someone at the the time that an hours work in the place (I was of course on the lowest level) only equated to the price of a pint. In hindsight if I was that age again at that time I wouldn't have worked for a job paying that level of money even at that age given the amount of money we teenagers spent on the weekend. An hours work for the price of a pint looking back on it? No way! :)
And that is how Fergal Quinn made his money - paying crap wages.
 

Northsideman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2010
Messages
9,620
This is serious bullsh*t - and clearly you weren't around in 1984 to have any idea what was going on - I worked in the post office in 1984 and did so for another 20 years. The company was riddled with incompetent management - incompetent management under the watch of Fergal Quinn.

The postal service is a social service - it does a lot more than just deliver mail - and it has a universal service obligation. Like in all public services the private sector has been allowed to cherry-pick the most profitable parts of the postal system and An Post has been left to carry the can for the rest of the service. Furthermore - I notice that you completely ignored the fact that most postal services on the planet - both public and privatised - receive massive state subsidies - An Post has never received a penny - the absence of state funding and ongoing subsidies has resulted in people like Quinn hacking the postal system to bits and slashing jobs and services. The demise of the postal system has been predicted for more than two decades - yet mail volumes continue to at high levels - parcel delivery continues to expand and there are countless other services the post office could provide - except the government doesn't want it competing with its friends in the private sector.
That is really serious bullshite, I was around then, I worked in and witnessed the work practices in the Mail Centres including the new one at Knockmitten, I personally heard shop stewards telling workers to take unused sick leave. The work practices there were rotten to the core and possibly criminal. The management you speak of were very much in place prior to Quinns time and tolerated the unions fraudulent practices, he had to deal with that sh!te where these idiots workers and management thought of themselves as above reproach. No private business would have tolerated what went on in the mail centres and rightly so but the management did and connived with unions to maintain the status quo. Don't tell me I don't know I know full well what went on in the mail centres and if you really worked there so do you but perhaps you think it was all ok.
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,193
The Irish postal system was starved of any funding for decades. In the run up to the splitting of Posts and Telegraphs in 1984 the government pumped more than £700million into Telecom to make it juicy for privatisation - An Post was supposed to get the same amount - it didn't get a penny. Instead Quinn took a hatchet to the postal service - and it still hasn't recovered.
What aspects of the postal service are inadequate, and how is that as a consequence of actions by Quinn?
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,193
I worked in Superquinn for around a year when I was in school. The pay was crap as you said but almost the same as Quinnsworth at the time (Quinnsworth was a few pence less). I remember remarking to someone at the the time that an hours work in the place (I was of course on the lowest level) only equated to the price of a pint. In hindsight if I was that age again at that time I wouldn't have worked for a job paying that level of money even at that age given the amount of money we teenagers spent on the weekend. An hours work for the price of a pint looking back on it? No way! :)
You shouldn't have been drinking pints at school age, bucko.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top