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Senior Garda heads off into the sunset to police the Wild West of the Cayman Islands

cyberianpan

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The Cayman Islands have a reputation for being Wild Westier for Finance than even Ireland

Interesting to see this:
Senior garda heads for Cayman Islands | Ireland | The Times & The Sunday Times
The senior garda who led the Anglo Irish Bank fraud investigation has been selected as the commissioner of police for the Cayman Islands.
The Cayman Islands pay handsomely , and I can see why a senior Irish Garda would fit well in there

To what extent if any, should there be policy on senior public servants retiring to take up other positions ?

How might such a policy take into account if the position was to be much more highly remunerated than the position retired from ?

cyp
 


retep

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Listened to another retired senior Garda on Marian F show this morning with Brendan O'Connor deploring the inhibited strength and lack of morale in the Gardai wrought by neglect and underinvestment by successive governments.

Why is it however that it seems to be only in retirement that these guys get vocal. Whilst in a position to actually make a difference they toe the line and mouth empty assurances that they have adequate resources
 

GabhaDubh

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Caymans is very safe, a cushy job. Went early morning snorkeling 7 AM while the Island is asleep and stayed in the water for hour. Grabbed my towel and went on my way. Hour later realized that I had left my wallet when I returned it was still on the beach. Workers coming from other Island do not want to lose a good paying job, low crime. The second Island has a Irish name Cayman Brac.
 
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cyberianpan

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Caymans is very safe, a cushy job. Went early morning snorkeling 7 AM while the Island is asleep and stayed in the water for hour. Grabbed my towel and went on my way. Hour later realized that I had left my wallet when I returned it was still on the beach. Workers coming from other Island do not want to lose a good paying job, low crime. The second Island has a Irish name Cayman Brac.
He will have many of the donut there ...almost no risk...very high pay...a safe pair of hands...proven and tested

cyp
 

Analyzer

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Maybe the Caymans
- are being used as a highway and transport hub for transitting high volumes of drugs to a neighbouring region that is simply massive in scale
- is a favoured location for peadophiles seeking weekend breaks and material exchanges
- has local oligarchies who impovrish society whilst funding mainstream political partoes and media organs
- does not want to imprison criminals...


In which case experience in Ireland is a real plus.
 

firefly123

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Shocking. Imagine someone moving to a tropical paradise for an easier job with better pay.
 

Prester Jim

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If we had a merit based selection process in AGS I would be pleased for the chap to be heading off to a nice pre-retirement job after a few decades of public service and a hard job well done.
As it is I can't look at any AGS spokesperson or Garda over sergeant level without thinking that they are just political animals and recipients of crony favouritism who quite probably took their job away from someone who would do it better.
All I can say is thank fup for p.ie so I can make this tedious point online rather than to my long suffering wife and friends...
;)
 

Roberto Jordan

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Shocking. Imagine someone moving to a tropical paradise for an easier job with better pay.
Indeed.

However I am guessing some are possibly touching on the somewhat global phenomenon of senior public servants jumping across the divide to become "poacher" ,not the case here clearly, or receiving relatively generous retirement benefits granted on predication of absence of further opportunity- possibly ( probably ) the case here.

As for the appointment- it can be hard to parse through show ( perp walk) versus reality ( few bankers jailed) when gauging US federal authority success in similar cases to Anglo - but I'd have thought they offer a better model. Though, second guessing that, I assume the non law enforcement authorities in cayman are similarly disinterested or actively set against proper white collar law enforcement as in Ireland - making experience if operating in such a hostile jurisdiction relevant
 

WayOutWest

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He might be the ideal man for this job. I wouldn't have considered him as being very successful as regards Anglo, very few prosecutions for something that cost the people of this country so much. If the oversight on financial dealings is less demanding than in Ireland then he should have an easy time.
I wonder if the Cayman Islands is still a popular place for the rich of this country to hide their wealth?
 

cogar

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We don't have conscription in the Defence Forces or the Garda and our public servants can move and change jobs if they wish.

'Wild Westier for Finance that even Ireland' - whatever than means? The man makes a decision and the best of luck to him and to be honest it is really not much of anybody's business what he does or where he works.
 

cyberianpan

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We don't have conscription in the Defence Forces or the Garda and our public servants can move and change jobs if they wish.

'Wild Westier for Finance that even Ireland' - whatever than means? The man makes a decision and the best of luck to him and to be honest it is really not much of anybody's business what he does or where he works.
The Cayman Islands are a notorious tax haven and do very little financial regulation above and beyond the legal minimum (bar AML/CTF where they excel)

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jan/18/the-cayman-islands-home-to-100000-companies-and-the-850-packet-of-fish-fingers
The Caribbean dependency is more British than Bognor, but helps shield £20bn a year from the Treasury. Here are 10 facts about the world’s most notorious tax haven
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cayman_Islands#Financial_services_industry
In the first conviction of a non-Swiss financial institution for US tax evasion conspiracy, two Cayman Islands financial institutions pleaded guilty in Manhattan Federal Court in 2016 to conspiring to hide more than $130 million in Cayman Islands bank accounts. The companies admitted to helping US clients hide assets in offshore accounts, and agreed to produce account files of non-compliant US taxpayers.[63]
cyp
 

cogar

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The Cayman Islands is a 'notorious tax haven' - so is Ireland a 'notorious tax haven'. I still don't get the point of this thread.The man is a cop - not a legislator nor a revenue expert or an accountant nor a forensic accountant. He is a cop and he will do what cops should do - apply the laws of the state firmly and fairly.
 

cyberianpan

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The Cayman Islands is a 'notorious tax haven' - so is Ireland a 'notorious tax haven'. I still don't get the point of this thread.The man is a cop - not a legislator nor a revenue expert or an accountant nor a forensic accountant. He is a cop and he will do what cops should do - apply the laws of the state firmly and fairly.
Did you notice Ireland's laws being applied firmly over recent years ? Especially say in Financial matters ...

cyp
 

firefly123

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Did you notice Ireland's laws being applied firmly over recent years ? Especially say in Financial matters ...

cyp
What laws? The Garda are not responsible for legislation. Their job is to investigate and enforce laws that are on the statute books. That our statute books seem to be more single sheets of paper when it comes to white collar crime is an issue for our politicans.
 

cogar

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The application of Ireland's law's? What is the link to a man changing his job? The courts in Ireland are extremely busy these days. Police investigate crime - they do not prosecute indictable offences. That is the role of the DPP. Cast your innuendo in another direction. A man applied for a job - got the job and is taking the job. There are plenty of threads on white collar crimes.
 

cyberianpan

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The application of Ireland's law's? What is the link to a man changing his job? The courts in Ireland are extremely busy these days. Police investigate crime - they do not prosecute indictable offences. That is the role of the DPP. Cast your innuendo in another direction. A man applied for a job - got the job and is taking the job. There are plenty of threads on white collar crimes.
What laws? The Garda are not responsible for legislation. Their job is to investigate and enforce laws that are on the statute books. That our statute books seem to be more single sheets of paper when it comes to white collar crime is an issue for our politicans.
The Statute books have tremendous riches for people seeking to prosecute white collar crime

The missing link to my mind has been investigators, who could produce "Al Capone" style case briefs to hand to prosecutors

cyp
 

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