Should an employer be able to insist which language his staff speak with themselves/customers?

Cellachán Chaisil

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An interesting story not yet covered in English language media

‘This is an English-speaking business’ – oibrí beáir éirithe as a phost i gCorcaigh tar éis rabhadh a fháil gan Gaeilge a labhairt | Tuairisc.ie




A bar worker in Cork was given a warning by his employer due to the fact he spoke Irish with a fellow staff member and with some customers. Cormac Ó Bruic is a native Irish speaker from Corca Dhuibhne (Dingle peninsula) in west Kerry was formerly working in the Flying Enterprise. His employer, however, took umbrage at the fact that Cormac spoke Irish with a fellow native speaker from Corca Dhuibhne and was known to speak Irish with Irish-speaking customers.

His boss, Finbarr O'Shea, had warned him that the establishment was an "English Speaking Business" and he wasn't permitted to speak Irish. The employer warned him that from that point on, he would no longer be able to speak Irish while on duty. Ó Bruic refused to return to work as a result

O'Shea informed Ó Bruic that customers felt "uncomfortable" by the fact Irish was being spoken at the bar, though Ó Bruic found that difficult to understand. An Saol Ó Dheas, Raidió na Gaeltachta[/I]'s Munster based programme, contacted Mr O'Shea who informed them that his business was "multinational" and were he to allow everyone to speak their mother tongue "the business couldn't operate". Furthermore, he stated that the was a "language code" in the place in the same way that there are dress codes in others.

What does the forum think? Is an English only policy justified in this instance? Is this the same as businesses encouraging the use of Irish, or does it reflect a common negative attitude towards bilingualism?
 


Pabilito

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An interesting story not yet covered in English language media

‘This is an English-speaking business’ – oibrí beáir éirithe as a phost i gCorcaigh tar éis rabhadh a fháil gan Gaeilge a labhairt | Tuairisc.ie




A bar worker in Cork was given a warning by his employer due to the fact he spoke Irish with a fellow staff member and with some customers. Cormac Ó Bruic is a native Irish speaker from Corca Dhuibhne (Dingle peninsula) in west Kerry was formerly working in the Flying Enterprise. His employer, however, took umbrage at the fact that Cormac spoke Irish with a fellow native speaker from Corca Dhuibhne and was known to speak Irish with Irish-speaking customers.

His boss, Finbarr O'Shea, had warned him that the establishment was an "English Speaking Business" and he wasn't permitted to speak Irish. The employer warned him that from that point on, he would no longer be able to speak Irish while on duty. Ó Bruic refused to return to work as a result

O'Shea informed Ó Bruic that customers felt "uncomfortable" by the fact Irish was being spoken at the bar, though Ó Bruic found that difficult to understand. An Saol Ó Dheas, Raidió na Gaeltachta[/I]'s Munster based programme, contacted Mr O'Shea who informed them that his business was "multinational" and were he to allow everyone to speak their mother tongue "the business couldn't operate". Furthermore, he stated that the was a "language code" in the place in the same way that there are dress codes in others.

What does the forum think? Is an English only policy justified in this instance? Is this the same as businesses encouraging the use of Irish, or does it reflect a common negative attitude towards bilingualism?
Why do Gaeilgeoirí’s insist on alienating everyone with their passive aggressive attitude?.. Why don’t they realize that they are putting people off our native language?
 

GDPR

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An interesting story not yet covered in English language media

‘This is an English-speaking business’ – oibrí beáir éirithe as a phost i gCorcaigh tar éis rabhadh a fháil gan Gaeilge a labhairt | Tuairisc.ie




A bar worker in Cork was given a warning by his employer due to the fact he spoke Irish with a fellow staff member and with some customers. Cormac Ó Bruic is a native Irish speaker from Corca Dhuibhne (Dingle peninsula) in west Kerry was formerly working in the Flying Enterprise. His employer, however, took umbrage at the fact that Cormac spoke Irish with a fellow native speaker from Corca Dhuibhne and was known to speak Irish with Irish-speaking customers.

His boss, Finbarr O'Shea, had warned him that the establishment was an "English Speaking Business" and he wasn't permitted to speak Irish. The employer warned him that from that point on, he would no longer be able to speak Irish while on duty. Ó Bruic refused to return to work as a result

O'Shea informed Ó Bruic that customers felt "uncomfortable" by the fact Irish was being spoken at the bar, though Ó Bruic found that difficult to understand. An Saol Ó Dheas, Raidió na Gaeltachta[/I]'s Munster based programme, contacted Mr O'Shea who informed them that his business was "multinational" and were he to allow everyone to speak their mother tongue "the business couldn't operate". Furthermore, he stated that the was a "language code" in the place in the same way that there are dress codes in others.

What does the forum think? Is an English only policy justified in this instance? Is this the same as businesses encouraging the use of Irish, or does it reflect a common negative attitude towards bilingualism?
No. I'm all for the Irish language, but this is a business, not his and if the boss wants English only this employees choices are to comply or move on.
 

cabledude

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He who pays the piper........
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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Why do Gaeilgeoirí’s insist on alienating everyone with their passive aggressive attitude?.. Why don’t they realize that they are putting people off our native language?
By speaking it?
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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No. I'm all for the Irish language, but this is a business, not his and if the boss wants English only this employees choices are to comply or move on.
Is he justified though?
 

McTell

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No
....
What does the forum think? Is an English only policy justified in this instance? Is this the same as businesses encouraging the use of Irish, or does it reflect a common negative attitude towards bilingualism?

If a customer orders in english and is served in english, that's all that matters from the biz end. Doesn't matter what he speaks the rest of the time.

We have all dealt with east european receptionists who sort you out and then talk in polish with a friend.

I'm against irish being forced down (up?) our throats, but in Dingle it would add some local flavour in the background.
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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Cellachán Chaisil

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Absolutely, its entirely possible, likely even, that customers who do not speak the language would resent conversations going on around them they felt excluded from.
And you think that is an attitude that we should be pander to?

Is it reasonable to object to other people speaking other languages?
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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If a customer orders in english and is served in english, that's all that matters from the biz end. Doesn't matter what he speaks the rest of the time.

We have all dealt with east european receptionists who sort you out and then talk in polish with a friend.

I'm against irish being forced down (up?) our throats, but in Dingle it would add some local flavour in the background.
The pub is in Cork, the employees are from the Dingle Peninsula.
 
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talkingshop

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Absolutely, its entirely possible, likely even, that customers who do not speak the language would resent conversations going on around them they felt excluded from.
Yes, the exact same thing could happen if the staff were speaking Polish, Russian, whatever. In fact I would bet that where there are a few Poles working in e.g. a coffee shop they are generally told by the employer not to speak Polish to each other.
 

former wesleyan

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Did O'Shea bar the Irish speaking customers or remind them that it was an English speaking pub/business ? Like hell he did.
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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Comparison's sake. Has anyone here, while working abroad in non-English speaking countries, ever been told off for speaking English?
 

GDPR

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And you think that is an attitude that we should be pandering to?
I certainly do, customers, paying customers, particularly in the hospitality industry are at the very least entitled to feel comfortable and not alienated where they're giving their custom.

I would suggest to the young man he goes and fights his language wars somewhere else and at his own expense.
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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Would anyone here object to someone speaking Irish in their presence, even when the conversation doesn't concern them?
 


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