Should Asylum Seeker be allowed work?

Interestedhopeful

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I see rules are finally being put in place to allow asylum seekers to compete with Irish people for Irish jobs by the Department of Justice.

There is outrage among the social justice class that already low income sectors such as childcare, care of the elderly, gardening and construction are to be off-limits for asylum seekers. Instead only those who can succeed in finding a job which pays in excess of €30,000 per annum will be permitted to work.

A quick spin through the Tweet Machine will find the same cross section of outrage between braindead open borders media, political and the legal hawks who brought about the Supreme Court challenge in the first place that the Department opted not to open the flood gates. Maybe when Ologbugloo from Lagos replaces them at the editorial table they'll wonder if this cheerleading was so wise?

Job options for asylum seekers under new scheme ‘exceptionally limited’

The Department confirmed that from February 9th 2018 asylum seekers would have the right to apply for an employment permit under the Employment Permits Act 2003 but that the normal fee and conditions would apply.

This means applicants will have to pay between €500 to €1,000 for a six to 12 month employment permit. Applicants must also secure a job that pays a starting salary of at least €30,000 per annum and are unable to apply for a job in more than 60 different areas including positions in hospitality, healthcare, social work, childcare, general care services, marketing, sales, administration, textiles, printing, housekeeping, food and construction.

Should asylum seekers be permitted to work with no pre-conditions while not approved to remain?

Would letting them work not strengthen the claimed "ties to Ireland" they use in their appeals against deportation?

How should the natives and EEA migrants working in low paid jobs feel about this?
 


D

Deleted member 48908

Maybe employ them at the Depts. of Foreign Affairs and Justice to expedite their cases.
 

gleeful

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In an ideal world they wouldnt work during the (max) 4 weeks it takes to process their application for asylum.

But if we underresource the system so much that people are kept waiting for years... its only fair to let them live normal lives.
 

Interestedhopeful

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In an ideal world they wouldnt work during the (max) 4 weeks it takes to process their application for asylum.

But if we underresource the system so much that people are kept waiting for years... its only fair to let them live normal lives.
You know more than anyone that you will find practically no poster on p.ie that would have any objection to staffing the asylum and immigration portfolio. In fact, I would say that it should be funded on par (if not more than) with the Defence Forces as it is in fact the front line in the defence of Ireland.
 

gleeful

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You know more than anyone that you will find practically no poster on p.ie that would have any objection to staffing the asylum and immigration portfolio. In fact, I would say that it should be funded on par (if not more than) with the Defence Forces as it is in fact the front line in the defence of Ireland.
It is not funded enough now though. The system is too slow and it keeps people in limbo for far too long.

While that is true we should allow people to work if they want.
 

Mercurial

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Yes, they should be allowed to work.

Being able to seek work and participate in work is important - for many people it is part of what makes for a dignified life. Those who eventually have their applications accepted will be no worse off for having the opportunity and will likely be better off. Those whose applications are rejected under a reformed and just system will not be living in this country long enough to significantly disadvantage other workers.
 

Morgellons

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But they do work! Ok, sometimes you have to be a bit generous with the old whip, but I've got two of the dusky brutes doing my garden in summer, and a flexible little Asian one to do the housework all year round.

Everyone should have at least one-they're great!
 

Interestedhopeful

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Yes, they should be allowed to work.

Being able to seek work and participate in work is important - for many people it is part of what makes for a dignified life. Those who eventually have their applications accepted will be no worse off for having the opportunity and will likely be better off. Those whose applications are rejected under a reformed and just system will not be living in this country long enough to significantly disadvantage other workers.
This must be the double-speak others accuse you of. Why not target them at volunteer work or at some form of workfare scheme as obviously if they're not going to be here long enough to hold down a position to keep an Irish or EEA national it wouldn't really make sense to bother with this?
 

tsarbomb

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They shouldn't be allowed to look for work like Irish people or normal immigrants, as this would just encourage more people to travel here and claim asylum, but if they really want to work while their case is situation is being settled the state should provide jobs for them. It's important that people keep themselves active after all. Some good jobs for them would be tarmacing roads or clearing out illegal dumping sites, which are becoming a bigger problem.
 

troll account

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where do the blacks flying in from Nigeria..Senegal ect get the money for the flights into Dublin via Dubai :confused:
 

DexterGreen22

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Give them jobs at the Irish Times and RTE.
They can replace the current journalists and will work for half their salary or on zero hours contracts.
 

papaquebec

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Yes, they should be allowed to work.

Being able to seek work and participate in work is important - for many people it is part of what makes for a dignified life. Those who eventually have their applications accepted will be no worse off for having the opportunity and will likely be better off. Those whose applications are rejected under a reformed and just system will not be living in this country long enough to significantly disadvantage other workers.
You and I both know full well that the fact that they were "working and contributing" will form the main plank in their appeal against the refusal of their asylum application and/or their subsequent application for subsidiary protection.
 

Interestedhopeful

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You and I both know full well that the fact that they were "working and contributing" will form the main plank in their appeal against the refusal of their asylum application and/or their subsequent application for subsidiary protection.
This is what positively enrages me about this as I've been keeping a close eye on those involved in this case, who no surprise are making a living solely from poking holes in our borders, and they're openly involved in pushing the framework further and further with no consideration of the consequences.
 

Watcher2

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Unto while their application is in process. They should be processed within 9 months including any appeal. If failed, they should be sent back. If successful, then yes, they should be allowed work.
 


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