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Should Fine Gael and Labour merge as a Social Democratic Party?


FloatingVoterTralee

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May 8, 2009
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Though not unique among European legislatures, Ireland is one of the few countries within Europe to lack a party subscribing to the tenets of social liberalism. In many respects, Labour comes closest to equating to a Liberal Democrat -style movement, due to its preoccupation with social reform, though elements within FG have also shown liberal strains in the past, as evident through Declan Costello's "Just Society" and the Garret Fitzgerald wing of the party in the Eighties and early Nineties. The current discussions concerning abortion and gay marriage give Government TDs of similar opinion an opportunity to recast the political landscape and thus transform the electoral dynamic. By creating a large liberal centre, the putative SDP would force FF to stick its head above the parapet and firmly nail its colours to the conservative mast. Similarly, Sinn Féin and the ULA would scrap it out for the left-wing vote, forcing both parties to abandon "opposition for opposition's sake" in favour of defined principle. Finally, by effectively moving to a three-party system, a clear definition of policy options would reduce public cynicism and/or apathy surrounding modern politics.
 

Nemesiscorporation

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Oct 2, 2011
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14,214
Simple answer no.

There are no parties in Ireland that even come close to being a social democrat party.

Also no one in Ireland would vote for such a party as they favour long term planning and development of a country, which is the complete opposite of what FG, FF, Labour and Sinn Fein do.
 

Prester Jim

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Jul 3, 2009
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10,071
Fine Gael is not social democrat at all and labour's actions speak of them not being social democrats either.
Why would two non social democrat parties join to become a social democratic party?
 

Analyzer

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They should both join up together with FF and form a bank bondholder party.
 

Nemesiscorporation

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Oct 2, 2011
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They should both join up together with FF and form a bank bondholder party.
Are you actually advocating honesty in Irish politics?

In Ireland that is probably viewed as worse than blasphemy :)

If FF, FG and Labour Joined together they could call defintely themselves the bank bondholder party.

Then again if FF, FG, SF and Labour where to join together they could call themselves the protection racket. That really would be a political party with clout (literally), that could collect tax or knee cap you while delivering less services, make people pay more tax, etc, etc.

Don't give an of the cute heurs ideas :)
 

borntorum

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May 26, 2008
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12,805
This silly topic again. The last time this was in any way seriously suggested was back when Michael Noonan was leading FG and trying to impress the Irish Times by calling himself a social democrat. That all worked out well.

FG are now at their most traditionally conservative since the Cosgrave days of the 70s. The mongrel foxes have been well and truly rooted out.
 

RahenyFG

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Joined
Jun 17, 2010
Messages
9,206
Though not unique among European legislatures, Ireland is one of the few countries within Europe to lack a party subscribing to the tenets of social liberalism. In many respects, Labour comes closest to equating to a Liberal Democrat -style movement, due to its preoccupation with social reform, though elements within FG have also shown liberal strains in the past, as evident through Declan Costello's "Just Society" and the Garret Fitzgerald wing of the party in the Eighties and early Nineties. The current discussions concerning abortion and gay marriage give Government TDs of similar opinion an opportunity to recast the political landscape and thus transform the electoral dynamic. By creating a large liberal centre, the putative SDP would force FF to stick its head above the parapet and firmly nail its colours to the conservative mast. Similarly, Sinn Féin and the ULA would scrap it out for the left-wing vote, forcing both parties to abandon "opposition for opposition's sake" in favour of defined principle. Finally, by effectively moving to a three-party system, a clear definition of policy options would reduce public cynicism and/or apathy surrounding modern politics.
This nearly happened in the late 1960s but didn't and I don't see it happening now. There are differences between FG and Labour. FG want to cut more Labour want to tax more. FG are generally more conservative on social issues(Yes I know abortion is coming in) while Labour are more liberal on social issues being pro abortion and pro gay marriage.
 

RahenyFG

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By creating a large liberal centre, the putative SDP would force FF to stick its head above the parapet and firmly nail its colours to the conservative mast.
Not entirely as FF are a centrist 'catch all' party that does not have one definite ideology.
 

southwestkerry

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Aug 20, 2008
Messages
4,230
FG and Labour merge, not likely at all. Labour are more up SF's street than FG. So if any merging is going to happen some day soon its likely to be with the fringe folks.
swk
 

RahenyFG

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Wha'? When? How?

Around the time of "the seventies will be socialist"?
Read it in Garrett FitzGerald's autobiography. Not a very interesting book. Only read 200 pages of it and it's 600 pages in total.
 
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