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Should Ireland Create Strategic Partnerships with other Small States?

ruserious

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
Much of the discourse in contemporary international finance suggests that countries are in a rush to open and boost relations with the BRIC countries as they are believed to be the next major economic hubs.

Small states like ours will most likely get little headway with these growing powers due to our small influence.

So I pose the question: Should Ireland Create Strategic Partnerships with other Small States?

Ireland is not publicised around the world outside of the major economic hubs. An example of this is from a Taiwan person I know who prior to coming to Ireland, believed we were part of the UK.

So this OP suggests that we should create these strategic partnerships with small states in order to enhance our reputation in the region and claim some early markets which will inevitably grow in a resulting economic boom of the BRICs due to a flying geese paradigm.

The following are a list of States I think we could create partnerships with:

  • Estonia
  • Uruguay
  • Malaysia
  • Namibia
  • Azerbaijan

The partnerships would involve trade missions and perhaps donating expertise from this country to help develop those countries into a stable modern liberal democratic state (I know Estonia already is..). Note, no monetary financing per say, just expertise and perhaps trade agreements if the WTO allows it.

Each of the forementioned States are located near large emerging markets. They will not have the same competition as the BRICs and, if we can develop our presence in these countries, there would be many bordering countries willing to engage with Ireland.

We need to be smart with our economic recovery. Rushing blindfolded into the BRIC's just because the WSJ says so is foolish.

There are of course many other countries I could have mentioned, and if you feel I left out an obvious one, please share.

I will finish on this: Concentrating all our trade with the EU and the BRIC's going forward ignores the vast potential that is out there which would have less international competition.

What say's the board?


Rus.
 


happytuesdays

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Dec 7, 2010
Messages
1,778
An excellent idea. It is an idea that is to some extent in practise already. But your idea provides an emphasis and conceptual framework that other arrangements lack. You should write the idea up send it to TDs and try to get on the radio.

I think that this should be the future of Irish Aid and Immigration policy as well as a very useful long term diplomatic strategy.

My only criticism would be the absence of European countries from the list.
 

ruserious

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
An excellent idea. It is an idea that is to some extent in practise already. But your idea provides an emphasis and conceptual framework that other arrangements lack. You should write the idea up send it to TDs and try to get on the radio.

I think that this should be the future of Irish Aid and Immigration policy as well as a very useful long term diplomatic strategy.

My only criticism would be the absence of European countries from the list.
Thank you for replying.

I included Estonia which I think, would allow Ireland to radiate influence throughout the baltic states.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,377
Brilliant Idea. I am sort of busy now but will opine a bit later.
 

happytuesdays

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The countries below have populations below six million and over three million:

Tibet 5,700,000 108
Sierra Leone 5,525,000 109
Nicaragua 5,487,000 110
Denmark 5,431,000 111
Slovakia 5,401,000 112
Kyrgyzstan 5,264,000 113
Finland 5,249,000[7] 114
Turkmenistan 4,833,000 115
Norway 4,620,000[8] 116
Croatia 4,551,000 117
United Arab Emirates 4,496,000 118
Georgia 4,474,000 119
Eritrea 4,401,000 120
Costa Rica 4,327,000 121
Singapore 4,326,000 122
Moldova 4,206,000 123
Ireland 4,148,000 123
Central African Republic 4,038,000 124
New Zealand 4,028,000 125
Republic of the Congo 3,999,000 126
Bosnia and Herzegovina 3,907,000 128
Lebanon 3,577,000 130
Uruguay 3,463,000 131
Lithuania 3,431,000 132
Liberia 3,283,000 133
Panama 3,232,000 134
Albania 3,130,000 135
Mauritania 3,069,000 136
Armenia 3,016,000
 

ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
The countries below have populations below six million and over three million:

Tibet 5,700,000 108
Sierra Leone 5,525,000 109
Nicaragua 5,487,000 110
Denmark 5,431,000 111
Slovakia 5,401,000 112
Kyrgyzstan 5,264,000 113
Finland 5,249,000[7] 114
Turkmenistan 4,833,000 115
Norway 4,620,000[8] 116
Croatia 4,551,000 117
United Arab Emirates 4,496,000 118
Georgia 4,474,000 119
Eritrea 4,401,000 120
Costa Rica 4,327,000 121
Singapore 4,326,000 122
Moldova 4,206,000 123
Ireland 4,148,000 123
Central African Republic 4,038,000 124
New Zealand 4,028,000 125
Republic of the Congo 3,999,000 126
Bosnia and Herzegovina 3,907,000 128
Lebanon 3,577,000 130
Uruguay 3,463,000 131
Lithuania 3,431,000 132
Liberia 3,283,000 133
Panama 3,232,000 134
Albania 3,130,000 135
Mauritania 3,069,000 136
Armenia 3,016,000
Out of that list, Costa Rica and Georgia seem the best options. We don't want a basket case on our hands either or rich states like New Zealand which are isolated geographically.
 

gerhard dengler

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Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
Much of the discourse in contemporary international finance suggests that countries are in a rush to open and boost relations with the BRIC countries as they are believed to be the next major economic hubs.

Small states like ours will most likely get little headway with these growing powers due to our small influence.

So I pose the question: Should Ireland Create Strategic Partnerships with other Small States?

Ireland is not publicised around the world outside of the major economic hubs. An example of this is from a Taiwan person I know who prior to coming to Ireland, believed we were part of the UK.

So this OP suggests that we should create these strategic partnerships with small states in order to enhance our reputation in the region and claim some early markets which will inevitably grow in a resulting economic boom of the BRICs due to a flying geese paradigm.

The following are a list of States I think we could create partnerships with:

  • Estonia
  • Uruguay
  • Malaysia
  • Namibia
  • Azerbaijan

The partnerships would involve trade missions and perhaps donating expertise from this country to help develop those countries into a stable modern liberal democratic state (I know Estonia already is..). Note, no monetary financing per say, just expertise and perhaps trade agreements if the WTO allows it.

Each of the forementioned States are located near large emerging markets. They will not have the same competition as the BRICs and, if we can develop our presence in these countries, there would be many bordering countries willing to engage with Ireland.

We need to be smart with our economic recovery. Rushing blindfolded into the BRIC's just because the WSJ says so is foolish.

There are of course many other countries I could have mentioned, and if you feel I left out an obvious one, please share.

I will finish on this: Concentrating all our trade with the EU and the BRIC's going forward ignores the vast potential that is out there which would have less international competition.

What say's the board?


Rus.
It is a very good idea in principle that you suggest here.

One caveat, there have been moves for closer economic integration between the UK and Ireland in recent years.
Would the type of alliance you propose have any impact on the Ireland/UK initiative?
 

ruserious

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
It is a very good idea in principle that you suggest here.

One caveat, there have been moves for closer economic integration between the UK and Ireland in recent years.
Would the type of alliance you propose have any impact on the Ireland/UK initiative?
Why would it? There is an Anglo-Irish unit at the DFA. I suggest perhaps setting up a new unit to deal solely with these strategic partnerships.
 

ruserious

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
I can't help but feel disheartened as my OP was a serious attempt to foster debate and only got 10 replies, 3 mine, and a rant about pepperonni gets 75.
 

freewillie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2013
Messages
7,295
Much of the discourse in contemporary international finance suggests that countries are in a rush to open and boost relations with the BRIC countries as they are believed to be the next major economic hubs.

Small states like ours will most likely get little headway with these growing powers due to our small influence.

So I pose the question: Should Ireland Create Strategic Partnerships with other Small States?

Ireland is not publicised around the world outside of the major economic hubs. An example of this is from a Taiwan person I know who prior to coming to Ireland, believed we were part of the UK.

So this OP suggests that we should create these strategic partnerships with small states in order to enhance our reputation in the region and claim some early markets which will inevitably grow in a resulting economic boom of the BRICs due to a flying geese paradigm.

The following are a list of States I think we could create partnerships with:

  • Estonia
  • Uruguay
  • Malaysia
  • Namibia
  • Azerbaijan

The partnerships would involve trade missions and perhaps donating expertise from this country to help develop those countries into a stable modern liberal democratic state (I know Estonia already is..). Note, no monetary financing per say, just expertise and perhaps trade agreements if the WTO allows it.

Each of the forementioned States are located near large emerging markets. They will not have the same competition as the BRICs and, if we can develop our presence in these countries, there would be many bordering countries willing to engage with Ireland.

We need to be smart with our economic recovery. Rushing blindfolded into the BRIC's just because the WSJ says so is foolish.

There are of course many other countries I could have mentioned, and if you feel I left out an obvious one, please share.

I will finish on this: Concentrating all our trade with the EU and the BRIC's going forward ignores the vast potential that is out there which would have less international competition.

What say's the board?


Rus.
We'd be better off forming a military alliance with Russia and China. Then see our so called allies in Europe and the U.S.A. change their tune
 

ruserious

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
We'd be better off forming a military alliance with Russia and China. Then see our so called allies in Europe and the U.S.A. change their tune
My mistake, I should have added 'No idiotic responses' in the OP.
 

florin

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Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
1,346
I don't know if Estonia have much to learn from us; maybe they could teach us something.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,377
OK, the first thing I want to do is say what the alliance cannot be. It can't be a free trade deal of any substantial weight because trade is a matter for the EU. In my own opinion, the best trade position for countries with no big internal market in free trade with pretty much everyone, because we always gain more than we lose due to the relative sizes of each county's market versus our own. See HK , Singapore and Dubai for how this would work.
Nor can it be a military alliance because military alliance because either lots of small countries are pre-committed, or have nothing in common to defend against. That is not to say that there could not be co-operation whereby small countries come together and discuss and share information on things like asymmetric warfare- things that would give us an edge against the big powers and make it every more costly to attack us.

So what can it be? I believe that biggest and most underrated advantage of any sort of alliance or economic organization is the network effect. Simply by meeting regularly and sharing information, specifically economic exchange, people in each country will discover opportunities in each others economies of which they were previously unaware, trade networks will form, companies will co-operate and merge, investment will increase, consortia to bid on big projects that were previously considered too big for any single country will be formed, joint intellectual resources can be pooled, areas where the public sector in one state excels can be exported to other states, global universities with intercontinental campuses can be formed.....................

But it all depends on people being exposed to each other to begin with in order for those networks to form. And the key thing is that they can develop organically, without too much input from the state, except for cross-recognition of various standards and sponsorhip of some sort of platform or series of events to facilitate the exchange to begin with.

Now if it takes off, it could be massive-most nations are small. Get twenty or so and you could have bloc that numbers in the hundreds of millions. That would be great leverage to counterbalance the weight of bigger local powers, who would no doubt try to trip it up at every opportunity.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,377
A very important early step would be to encourage banking joint ventures between a bunch of banks in member nation-states, and to sign a bunch of agreements that allows for easier access for domestic firms to the stock and bond markets of other countries.

Another big deal is the simplification of visa rules for business and tourism.

The next is the creation of an international clearing house for ideas, a kind of buy-and-sell where countries and companies can advertise their projects for investment or indicated areas in which they require investment. This could be a sort of one stop shop which each interested entity could go kerb-crawling to look for partners.
 

ruserious

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,085
OK, the first thing I want to do is say what the alliance cannot be. It can't be a free trade deal of any substantial weight because trade is a matter for the EU. In my own opinion, the best trade position for countries with no big internal market in free trade with pretty much everyone, because we always gain more than we lose due to the relative sizes of each county's market versus our own. See HK , Singapore and Dubai for how this would work.
Nor can it be a military alliance because military alliance because either lots of small countries are pre-committed, or have nothing in common to defend against. That is not to say that there could not be co-operation whereby small countries come together and discuss and share information on things like asymmetric warfare- things that would give us an edge against the big powers and make it every more costly to attack us.

So what can it be? I believe that biggest and most underrated advantage of any sort of alliance or economic organization is the network effect. Simply by meeting regularly and sharing information, specifically economic exchange, people in each country will discover opportunities in each others economies of which they were previously unaware, trade networks will form, companies will co-operate and merge, investment will increase, consortia to bid on big projects that were previously considered too big for any single country will be formed, joint intellectual resources can be pooled, areas where the public sector in one state excels can be exported to other states, global universities with intercontinental campuses can be formed.....................

But it all depends on people being exposed to each other to begin with in order for those networks to form. And the key thing is that they can develop organically, without too much input from the state, except for cross-recognition of various standards and sponsorhip of some sort of platform or series of events to facilitate the exchange to begin with.

Now if it takes off, it could be massive-most nations are small. Get twenty or so and you could have bloc that numbers in the hundreds of millions. That would be great leverage to counterbalance the weight of bigger local powers, who would no doubt try to trip it up at every opportunity.
I would agree with most of that but I see the State having a role of facilitating the promotion of relationships.
 


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