Should Irish citizens up North get a vote in the Abortion Referendum?

Aquilius

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Came across an article in an Irish newspaper earlier today and the topic of the piece is quite unsettling with regards to the outcome if it swings in the individuals favour.

Anyhow an Irish citizen student in Northern Ireland is to bring a case against the Irish government in the High Court in Dublin next month, April 9th. Her issue? The fact that citizens north of the border have no right to vote in the upcoming referendum expected to be held this May (2018).

Now as far as I understand Irish citizens no matter where they live have a right to vote in any election/referendum held in this state once they are present and have a residence in the Republic of Ireland.

I am vehemently against extending voting rights in any form to citizens if they are not resident in the state. Allowing individuals who don't live in Ireland (no matter their reason) to vote from abroad would be catastrophic. You cannot have individuals living abroad swaying a decision one way or another - that would effect those that live here greatly, whilst possibly never having to feel the consequences of their decision themselves.

What is other posters opinions on the subject? There's a link to the article below...

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/student-seeking-right-for-northern-ireland-citizens-to-vote-in-abortion-referendum-36704632.html
 


Mushroom

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"She is represented by the Belfast law firm of Madden & Finucane."

'nuff said. Pure, 22 carat wank.
 

Sync

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It wouldn’t be catastrophic, the US has developed an efficient way of doing it. But no representation without taxation. If you want a vote, you have to contribute to the State.

And it’s clearly an internal legislative/constitutional reform decision. There’s no way any court is going to give this to them.
 
D

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No need to go "up" anywhere to find votes.

Plenty of votes down the years have come from below....six feet below.
 

Mercurial

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Came across an article in an Irish newspaper earlier today and the topic of the piece is quite unsettling with regards to the outcome if it swings in the individuals favour.

Anyhow an Irish citizen student in Northern Ireland is to bring a case against the Irish government in the High Court in Dublin next month, April 9th. Her issue? The fact that citizens north of the border have no right to vote in the upcoming referendum expected to be held this May (2018).

Now as far as I understand Irish citizens no matter where they live have a right to vote in any election/referendum held in this state once they are present and have a residence in the Republic of Ireland.

I am vehemently against extending voting rights in any form to citizens if they are not resident in the state. Allowing individuals who don't live in Ireland (no matter their reason) to vote from abroad would be catastrophic. You cannot have individuals living abroad swaying a decision one way or another - that would effect those that live here greatly, whilst possibly never having to feel the consequences of their decision themselves.

What is other posters opinions on the subject? There's a link to the article below...

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/student-seeking-right-for-northern-ireland-citizens-to-vote-in-abortion-referendum-36704632.html
Some people who live here won't be affected at all by this referendum. Should they not be allowed to vote?
 

the secretary

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Why, it doesn't concern the people of the 6 counties!
Should we have got a vote on Brexit?
 

Mercurial

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It wouldn’t be catastrophic, the US has developed an efficient way of doing it. But no representation without taxation. If you want a vote, you have to contribute to the State.
How much should you have to contribute in order to buy the right to vote?
 

Mushroom

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Some people who live here won't be affected at all by this referendum. Should they not be allowed to vote?
That applies to all referenda. And yes, they should be.

They have all got a stake in our Constitution so are all entitled to to vote in any referenda that propose to amend it.
 

Mercurial

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That applies to all referenda. And yes, they should be.

They have all got a stake in our Constitution so are all entitled to to vote in any referenda that propose to amend it.
Don't non-resident citizens have a stake in our Constitution too?
 

Mushroom

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Catalpast

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I would agree for Irish Citizens being able to vote in a Presidential Election and some elected representatives from the North having speaking rights in An Seanad

- but not in this one

Hopefully one day we wont have to have this discussion....
 

Roberto Jordan

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How much should you have to contribute in order to buy the right to vote?
Thats the worng wany of looking at it though.....

Right to vote infers a stake in the state and its institution. Rights come with obligations. One of those as a citizen to make your fair contribution. If you have nothing , your fair contribution is nothing - this is not a retro grade return to property linked voting rights and its not like a tax clearance cert is asked for at polling stations in Ireland. Rather there is, in theory, financial liability for the actions of the democratically elected government is the economic obligation of being a a citizen, albeit trumped , in the case of most residents , by the wider day to day impact of living in a well or badly governed state.
IN the uS example this obligation amounts to nothing or very very little in the case of most US ex-pats and emigrants. However the principle is , I think , an important one.

I have been abroad more or less continuously for a decade. I certainly dont believe I should have the right to vote as things stand. And my foreign born dual passport kids definitely should not have it once they turn 18.
However if this right was balanced with the wider norms of resident citizenship...then maybe.
Otherwise you may as well give the vote to my neighbor who saw ireland once on TV.
 

Emily Davison

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"She is represented by the Belfast law firm of Madden & Finucane."

'nuff said. Pure, 22 carat wank.
You mean it's a try on, for money? (Carat)

Does 'enough' said imply that particular law firm?

(I already posted this article on the NI forum. No they should not be allowed to vote, and it's not going to happen)
 

Mushroom

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Last edited:

The_SR

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I have no conceptual problem with people in the 6 voting in referenda and presidential elections. The mechanics could be tasty.

Although this one looks like the McTaliban. A bit late in the day to put half a million on the register.
 


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