Should Polish be taught as part of the national curriculum?

O

Oscurito

In recent visits to both the Republic of Ireland and the UK, senior Polish statepersons have suggested that the Polish language should be taught in schools. As described in this article and this one, the statepersons in question, respectively the Foreign Minister Witold Waszczykowsk and the Prime Minister, Beata Szydło presented their argument on the basis of the need for recognition of the Polish community in Ireland.

Based on that argument alone, I would be inclined to disagree. Why should the Polish community be singled out in this way? We could end up with a situation in which Lithuanian, Tagalog, Hindi, Yoruba and Igbo are also given similar levels of recognition.

However, everyone seems to be missing a major point. Based on performance over the last decade, the Polish economy is set to be one of the top 4 European economies within 20 years, passing out Spain in 2029 and Italy in 2037.

I'm basing this on long term growth rates presented here and to be honest, I'm bumped up the Italian figures a bit so as not to be accused of being unduly pessimistic: the result of Sunday's referendum would raise questions as to the wisdom of my attempts at optimism. Even under the more optimistic scenario, Poland still passes out Italy in 20 years. If anyone wants to see my calculations, I can post them here.

Anyway, I think that this is the kind of discussion we should be having. Poland will be one of the major economic powers in Europe in just over a decade and there is every reason to argue that Polish should at least be accorded the same status as Spanish and Italian.
 


blokesbloke

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Certainly not, what a ridiculous suggestion.

It has faintly imperial tones - lots of Poles have moved to your country, so you must learn their language.

Nope, it's the other way round actually.

The Irish speak English because of colonialism, no need for them to be expected to learn another language because of a different form of it.

As for the economic argument, Polish would be useful to know but really, I can't see Poland becoming a more important economic partner to Ireland than Germany or France, for example.

If a language is to be learnt for economic reasons, Chinese might be more useful than any European language.

Polish would be a fair way down the list.

Besides, with so many Poles making their home in Ireland the country already has a base of workers with the necessary skills in English and Polish who can work for Irish companies who require the language.
 

Morgellons

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Does the OP mean as a foreign language choice for Leaving Cert? Then why not? Tough language to master though.
 

GDPR

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It would much better to teach Russian; there is a lot of scholarly work been done in Russia that is quite ground breaking which never makes it into translation (particularly as regards the Platonic tradition), the same also could be said about contemporary political philosophizing there.
 

Toland

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It would much better to teach Russian; there is a lot of scholarly work been done in Russia that is quite ground breaking which never makes it into translation (particularly as regards the Platonic tradition), the same also could be said about contemporary political philosophizing there.
I had to pinch myself, but I find myself agreeing with you. Though I have no idea of what you mean when you mention "the Platonic tradition".
 
O

Oscurito

Certainly not, what a ridiculous suggestion.

It has faintly imperial tones - lots of Poles have moved to your country, so you must learn their language.

Nope, it's the other way round actually.

The Irish speak English because of colonialism, no need for them to be expected to learn another language because of a different form of it.

As for the economic argument, Polish would be useful to know but really, I can't see Poland becoming a more important economic partner to Ireland than Germany or France, for example.

If a language is to be learnt for economic reasons, Chinese might be more useful than any European language.

Polish would be a fair way down the list.

Besides, with so many Poles making their home in Ireland the country already has a base of workers with the necessary skills in English and Polish who can work for Irish companies who require the language.
BB, with all due respect, I kind of tuned out at the second line. I made it quite clear that I wasn't arguing on that basis but on the basis of future economic trends in Poland and I wonder how you missed that.

This isn't a zero sum game. Chinese can be given a higher profile too but if you're arguing for Chinese, it makes sense to argue for Polish.
 
O

Oscurito

There are plenty of good reasons for puttng Polish, and lots of other languages, on the Irish school curriculum.

The presence of lots of Poles in Ireland is not among those good reasons, imo.
Which is why I dismiss it.
 

Truth.ie

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In recent visits to both the Republic of Ireland and the UK, senior Polish statepersons have suggested that the Polish language should be taught in schools. As described in this article and this one, the statepersons in question, respectively the Foreign Minister Witold Waszczykowsk and the Prime Minister, Beata Szydło presented their argument on the basis of the need for recognition of the Polish community in Ireland.

Based on that argument alone, I would be inclined to disagree. Why should the Polish community be singled out in this way? We could end up with a situation in which Lithuanian, Tagalog, Hindi, Yoruba and Igbo are also given similar levels of recognition.

However, everyone seems to be missing a major point. Based on performance over the last decade, the Polish economy is set to be one of the top 4 European economies within 20 years, passing out Spain in 2029 and Italy in 2037.

I'm basing this on long term growth rates presented here and to be honest, I'm bumped up the Italian figures a bit so as not to be accused of being unduly pessimistic: the result of Sunday's referendum would raise questions as to the wisdom of my attempts at optimism. Even under the more optimistic scenario, Poland still passes out Italy in 20 years. If anyone wants to see my calculations, I can post them here.

Anyway, I think that this is the kind of discussion we should be having. Poland will be one of the major economic powers in Europe in just over a decade and there is every reason to argue that Polish should at least be accorded the same status as Spanish and Italian.
As a first language more people speak Spanish globally than English.
Why would Spanish be on the same par as Polish?
 

silverharp

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Dublin could do with a few more international schools there are only a couple of private so far, whether Polish should be one of them is debatable
 

The_SR

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I'm nearly 100% sure it's an option
 
O

Oscurito

Does the OP mean as a foreign language choice for Leaving Cert? Then why not? Tough language to master though.
Yes. The idea would at least for it to be treated the same as German, French, Spanish and Italian.

Maybe we need to start teaching foreign languages earlier in the cycle ach sin snáithe eile, b'fheidir....?
 
O

Oscurito

As a first language more people speak Spanish globally than English.
Why would Spanish be on the same par as Polish?
Call me a total economic Philistine but most of them would have an economic power far less than your average Polish speaker.
 

petaljam

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It would much better to teach Russian; there is a lot of scholarly work been done in Russia that is quite ground breaking which never makes it into translation (particularly as regards the Platonic tradition), the same also could be said about contemporary political philosophizing there.
I came in here to say Russian would be better too, albeit possibly not for the same reasons. :)

I had to pinch myself, but I find myself agreeing with you. Though I have no idea of what you mean when you mention "the Platonic tradition".
Ditto.
 

Dame_Enda

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Until she practices what she preaches in her own immigration policy I would say no except as an optional.subject. She should also reflect on the role her party's attitude to lgbt people plays in emigration from Poland.
 


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