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Should Registered Charities have their accounts subject to regulatory review?

ruserious

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Charities have a unique place in Irish society. They have an advantageous tax code and have relatively unchecked and unbalanced controls on their spending and accounting.

Ought the government create a Charity Regulator which will have the power to conduct annual reviews of charity accounts in return for their advantageous tax breaks.

This would bring new confidence to a sector dogged by scandal and would seek to protect those most vulnerable, the service user.
 


Carlos Danger

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This already exists.

What accounts does a body with charitable tax exemption need to keep?

Annual Accounts must be kept and made available to the Revenue Commissioners on request. In the case of a body with income in excess of €100,000 per annum audited accounts must be submitted.
Frequently Asked Questions - Charities
 

Eire1976

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Goes without saying, if they are taking monies we need to be sure that all is above board.
 

Cato

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As Carlos said, this already exists. However, there are over 13,000 charities in Ireland - and some of those will not be treated as single accounting units, e.g. Scouting Ireland does not provide one consolidated set of accounts. Instead each group is an accounting unit for the purposes of the Charity Act and there are well over a hundred groups in Ireland.

That's a whole lot of oversight that needs doing ...
 

Carlos Danger

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I had a sneaking feeling that it did.

The fact that it does, puts the spotlight back to government in my view.
Not necessarily on the government, though they haven't exactly covered themselves in glory on the matter, rather on the Revenue.
 

Cato

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I had a sneaking feeling that it did.

The fact that it does, puts the spotlight back to government in my view.
The regulatory regime only started in the last six or so months. Many of the smaller charities still only have a provisional registration in.
 

Carlos Danger

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As Carlos said, this already exists. However, there are over 13,000 charities in Ireland - and some of those will not be treated as single accounting units, e.g. Scouting Ireland does not provide one consolidated set of accounts. Instead each group is an accounting unit for the purposes of the Charity Act and there are well over a hundred groups in Ireland.

That's a whole lot of oversight that needs doing ...
More auditors need hiring over at Revenue.
 

ruserious

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As Carlos said, this already exists. However, there are over 13,000 charities in Ireland - and some of those will not be treated as single accounting units, e.g. Scouting Ireland does not provide one consolidated set of accounts. Instead each group is an accounting unit for the purposes of the Charity Act and there are well over a hundred groups in Ireland.

That's a whole lot of oversight that needs doing ...
I suppose I would argue that charities which provide vital services to clients (suicide, cancer care etc) should be first on the list for oversight.
 

Cato

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I suppose I would argue that charities which provide vital services to clients (suicide, cancer care etc) should be first on the list for oversight.
I'd order them by size and then prioritise those in receipt of public monies.

To be honest, the little Scout group that I'm a leader in is in need of a lot less oversight then, say, Rehab! The total amount in the group's bank account would probably pay for a week's holiday in Scotland.
 

Lara2

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Heard a bit of the Ray D'Arcy show today where he had an interview with John Farrelly the Charities Regulator. here's the link, there's two minutes of waffle at the beginning then a half hour interview:

RTÉ Radio Player

Only heard little snippets and I'm going to have a listen again because I was busy.

What did stick out was:

There are 12,500-13,000 charities and not for profit organisations in Ireland,

100,000 people work in the charity sector,

5.75 Billion euro is spent on charities annually of which the govt gives 2.5 billion euro and the rest is made up from public donations and fees.
 

Carlos Danger

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I'd order them by size and then prioritise those in receipt of public monies.

To be honest, the little Scout group that I'm a leader in is in need of a lot less oversight then, say, Rehab! The total amount in the group's bank account would probably pay for a week's holiday in Scotland.
Yes, a common sense approach is what's needed.

OP, here's a small list to sink your teeth into..

Resident Charities authorised 25th May 2016 under the Scheme of Tax Relief for Donations to eligible Charities and other Approved Bodies under the terms of Section 848A Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997


The total amount in the group's bank account would probably pay for a week's holiday in Scotland
You can't fool us, Cato! We know that "holiday" is a euphemism for "reconnaissance". Ye're planning to invade, aren't ye? You and your scouts see Britain's weakness as an opportunity.
 

Felixness

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Most charities would be delighted to have transparency and regular checks on the industry. There are too many chancers out there who bring disrepute to the decent ones and it ends up hitting the charities with the least funds the hardest. It's the big charities, particularly the international ones that need the most investigation in my opinion.

That latest one, the floating ship of doctors who recently said they'll no longer accept funding from the EU is typical of the problem. They got over a million euro from Ireland alone last year, so who knows how much per year they've been raking in as an NGO. Clearly they don't need it if they can work without it.
 

Lara2

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Listening to the above interview again. Lots of waffle from Farrelly. Ray D'Arcy sounds apologetic while asking questions. Farrelly has no power until September. He has to "build a whole regulatory system including the computer system", which begs the question, what the hell was he and his predecessor actually doing since the office was set up since the Rehab scandal?

He has a staff of 23 people and he has to go through 12,500 charities (3000 of which are local entities).
 

damus

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The grant funder can also go in and audit a charitable organisation as part of the conditions of grant funding. The C&AG can also audit the organisation accounts at any time.
 

Who is John Galt?

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I heard on RTE news this evening that one gentleman got 600,000 from Saint John of God while also working as a public servant.
If this sort of thing can go on, anything can go on.
 

Catalpast

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Nov 17, 2012
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This many headed Hydra

- needs a few heads to roll

- before public confidence is restored

Too many chancers on a roll

- milking it for all its worth
 


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