Should we switch off from the news?

GDPR

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There's an article in today's New York Times about a journalist, Farhad Manjoo, who went back to just reading newspapers for two months. He switched off all his digital news notifications, Twitter and other social networks and kept to reading The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and his local paper The San Francisco Chronicle plus the weekly The Economist. This took about 40 minutes a day to read. He still received email newsletters and listened to podcasts.

Manjoo found the experience life-changing:

Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.

Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband and father.

Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our broken digital news environment.

We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization of news is ruining how we collectively process information.

Here's the link to his article: For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
The article has a lot more to say and is worth reading.

In February 2017 Manjoo also tried to get away from Don "Capone" Drumf news for a week: I Ignored Trump News for a Week. Here’s What I Learned.


Before the Internet I rarely bought newspapers. Instead I relied on the BBC for headlines and usually read one or more Sunday papers - remember how thick and heavy they were?

Do you think that Manjoo is right, and we should all follow his example... Definitely for news about Trump imho
 


dizillusioned

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There's an article in today's New York Times about a journalist, Farhad Manjoo, who went back to just reading newspapers for two months. He switched off all his digital news notifications, Twitter and other social networks and kept to reading The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and his local paper The San Francisco Chronicle plus the weekly The Economist. This took about 40 minutes a day to read. He still received email newsletters and listened to podcasts.

Manjoo found the experience life-changing:

Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.

Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband and father.

Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our broken digital news environment.

We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization of news is ruining how we collectively process information.

Here's the link to his article: For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
The article has a lot more to say and is worth reading.

In February 2017 Manjoo also tried to get away from Don "Capone" Drumf news for a week: I Ignored Trump News for a Week. Here’s What I Learned.


Before the Internet I rarely bought newspapers. Instead I relied on the BBC for headlines and usually read one or more Sunday papers - remember how thick and heavy they were?

Do you think that Manjoo is right, and we should all follow his example... Definitely for news about Trump imho
God help him if he lives in the USA. Print media here is atrocious. There is little outside world news and I am sure reading the titles that he does he has been indoctrinated...;)

There is nothing wrong with gettings news from many sources . reading it digesting it and making your own mind up.

If he gets stressed out over the news there is always Yoga and Meditation..;)
 

GDPR

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God help him if he lives in the USA. Print media here is atrocious. There is little outside world news and I am sure reading the titles that he does he has been indoctrinated...;)

There is nothing wrong with gettings news from many sources . reading it digesting it and making your own mind up.

If he gets stressed out over the news there is always Yoga and Meditation..;)
He lives in the USA - San Francisco he said in the article.

How many hours a day does the news take up your time?
 

dizillusioned

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He lives in the USA - San Francisco he said in the article.

How many hours a day does the news take up your time?
Not much being honest. I read the headlines and then flit between European Sources and American. When I get home I relax and take a walk chat to people and generally have a life.... if this guy spends so much time on the news he literally does not have a life.....

Mind you San Francisco... that explains a lot...;)
 

Bea C

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God help him if he lives in the USA. Print media here is atrocious. There is little outside world news and I am sure reading the titles that he does he has been indoctrinated...;)

There is nothing wrong with gettings news from many sources . reading it digesting it and making your own mind up.

If he gets stressed out over the news there is always Yoga and Meditation..;)
Or doing your hair?

I changed phone back in November and even though everything is switched on, I no longer get RTE messages, only occasional BBC ones, and though I've signed up to Sky and get them incessantly, they're usually only to tell me what premiership footballer has been caught cheating on his wife.
Initially I was wailing, but to be honest it hasn't made much of a difference.

BTW, while it's in my head, that Bill Murray doggie quote that I keep slapping up, did I tell you that I closed my last speech at Toastmasters with that on my powerpoint presentation?

 

bormotello

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He switched off all his digital news notifications, Twitter and other social networks and kept to reading The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and his local paper The San Francisco Chronicle plus the weekly The Economist.
as alternative
[video=youtube;QXUlhT3-r0c]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXUlhT3-r0c[/video]
 

Accidental sock

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I removed all news apps from my phone around Christmas last year.

I also stopped paying for wifi.

I can't believe how much free time I have now.

Last week I had 17 hours to myself in my car, stuck in a snowdrift.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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cutting RTE News out of my life has improved the smell about the house dramatically
 

storybud1

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Or doing your hair?

I changed phone back in November and even though everything is switched on, I no longer get RTE messages, only occasional BBC ones, and though I've signed up to Sky and get them incessantly, they're usually only to tell me what premiership footballer has been caught cheating on his wife.
Initially I was wailing, but to be honest it hasn't made much of a difference.

BTW, while it's in my head, that Bill Murray doggie quote that I keep slapping up, did I tell you that I closed my last speech at Toastmasters with that on my powerpoint presentation?

Funnily enough, I am suspicious of people who over-like dogs and I couldn't give a sh1t what a dog "thinks" because,,
wait for it ?? a dog cannot talk or understand pretty much anything about the human world.

Are you sure Murray wasn't taking the p1ss there ??
 

McTell

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Twitter
No
There's an article in today's New York Times about a journalist, Farhad Manjoo, who went back to just reading newspapers for two months. He switched off all his digital news notifications, ///

Relaaax honey, we are the news
 

Bea C

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Funnily enough, I am suspicious of people who over-like dogs and I couldn't give a sh1t what a dog "thinks" because,,
wait for it ?? a dog cannot talk or understand pretty much anything about the human world.

Are you sure Murray wasn't taking the p1ss there ??
Only a person who has never had a dog could come out with a statement like that.
 

dizillusioned

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Funnily enough, I am suspicious of people who over-like dogs and I couldn't give a sh1t what a dog "thinks" because,,
wait for it ?? a dog cannot talk or understand pretty much anything about the human world.

Are you sure Murray wasn't taking the p1ss there ??
Really? One of my partners has a dog who can sense when he is about to have an epileptic seizure and can warn him in advance. Dog has never been trained, so much for not understanding the human world.

Obviously, you are not a dog lover. Murray was right..;)
 

Trainwreck

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There's an article in today's New York Times about a journalist, Farhad Manjoo, who went back to just reading newspapers for two months. He switched off all his digital news notifications, Twitter and other social networks and kept to reading The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and his local paper The San Francisco Chronicle plus the weekly The Economist. This took about 40 minutes a day to read. He still received email newsletters and listened to podcasts.

Manjoo found the experience life-changing:

Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.

Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband and father.

Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our broken digital news environment.

We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization of news is ruining how we collectively process information.

Here's the link to his article: For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
The article has a lot more to say and is worth reading.

In February 2017 Manjoo also tried to get away from Don "Capone" Drumf news for a week: I Ignored Trump News for a Week. Here’s What I Learned.


Before the Internet I rarely bought newspapers. Instead I relied on the BBC for headlines and usually read one or more Sunday papers - remember how thick and heavy they were?

Do you think that Manjoo is right, and we should all follow his example... Definitely for news about Trump imho
You'd have to learn how to read first.
 

GDPR

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I removed all news apps from my phone around Christmas last year.

I also stopped paying for wifi.

I can't believe how much free time I have now.

Last week I had 17 hours to myself in my car, stuck in a snowdrift.
You should have remembered to bring your knitting. In 17 hours you could have finished at least the front or the back of a 12-ply sweater, maybe both if you knit fast.
 

GDPR

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Messages
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Funnily enough, I am suspicious of people who over-like dogs and I couldn't give a sh1t what a dog "thinks" because,,
wait for it ?? a dog cannot talk or understand pretty much anything about the human world.

Are you sure Murray wasn't taking the p1ss there ??
Dogs sense things humans cannot, for example detect something wrong such as cancer. I read one bloke had a large brown spot on his skin underarm which his dog kept licking and finally the bloke decided to see his GP about it. The bloke's dog saved his life as it had detected advanced lymph cancer. And it was able to communicate this to his owner.
 

Accidental sock

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...a dog cannot talk or understand pretty much anything about the human world.

Are you sure Murray wasn't taking the p1ss there ??
Only a person who has never had a dog could come out with a statement like that.
I don't know.

If the phone rang anywhere in the house, my dog used to fetch it voluntarily, and drop it in my lap.

He never understood how much I wanted to avoid talking to my mother.
 

Karloff

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RTE are part of the establishment and they promote views the establishment wants promoted, case in point i have noticed them releasing a lot of anti vegan/anti-vegetarian propaganda and i expect that is because of concerns about the hardships facing animal farmers in the coming years.
 

DexterGreen22

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The presstitute media are utterly livid that they can't manufacture consent as easily as they could a few decades ago.


'His insight explains why elites are so dedicated to indoctrination and thought control, a major and largely neglected theme of modern history. “The public must be put in its place,” Walter Lippmann wrote, so that we may “live free of the trampling and the roar of a bewildered herd,” whose “function” is to be “interested spectators of action,” not participants. And if the state lacks the force to coerce and the voice of the people can be heard, it is necessary to ensure that that voice says the right thing, as respected intellectuals have been advising for many years'.
https://chomsky.info/199107__/
 


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