Sinn Fein Collusion With MI5 Saved The Butcher Of The Bogside

between the bridges

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It appears McMG had an unlikely guardian angel...

A former MI5 agent within Sinn Féin who was close to Martin McGuinness has said that the British repeatedly protected the future deputy first minister while he was a senior IRA figure.

Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady and heard him arguing furiously with IRA hardliner Ivor Bell who was unhappy that Sinn Féin was increasingly mopping up money and resources which otherwise would have gone to the IRA.

He also reveals that it was MI5 who acted to protect the senior Sinn Féin figure



Makes wan wonder did collusion defeat the ahem undefeated army...

The recent spotlight series highlighted an aspect of collusion that hasn't received quite the same level of attention as some, like most things related to the troubles there is more than one side to the Dirty War story...

The IRA was so compromised by informers at every level that it realised it had to give up violence and move towards politics, republican and senior intelligence figures have said.

Spotlight said that security and republican sources had told it that the Castlereagh break-in exposed so many agents that it “posed an impossible question: How could they kill them all?”.

Former IRA director of intelligence Kieran Conway said that the security agencies’ war against the IRA had broken it.

He said: “The attrition rate was just so appalling.

“The SAS, the British intelligence services were obviously in a position to intercept most operations.

“It was absolutely clear that we were losing if we hadn’t already lost the war and that it was time to cash in the chips.”


“My mother had trained as a nurse so if anybody [in the IRA] was injured and couldn’t go to hospital, they would be brought to her,” Shauna recalled.

’. She was missing for 15 days. They tortured her.

“It was born into us that we were republicans. You hated the army, you hated Protestants, you hated the Brits. The IRA was meant to be on your side; they were meant to protect you.

“I went round to the house of a local IRA man after my mother was killed. He had steel security gates at the bottom of his stairs. I must have been 14 or 15. He wouldn’t come out but his son, who was 18, did. I [hit] him. The next day, four or five guys in balaclavas came round and told me to get out of the area.”

-
“I’m a volunteer. My name is Joseph Mulhern. I’ve been working for the Special Branch this past three years.”
-
The dead have a habit of haunting Northern Irish politics.


Gavin Larmour, whose father John was shot dead by the IRA in a Belfast ice cream parlour in 1988, believes the killing was not properly investigated to protect a high-level republican informer.

He claimed that the senior Provisional, who sat on the IRA army council in the 1990s and is a former Belfast Brigade commander, was recruited as a police agent after detectives presented him with evidence that would have led to his conviction for the murder.



He gambled that Sinn Féin, by now engaged in the peace process, could not afford to admit publicly that he had been a spy. If so, it would undermine their official line that they had fought the British to an honourable draw.

Any such admission would provoke the rank and file into questioning whether the IRA had been pushed into peace, paralysed by the penetration of agents like him.



The second most senior IRA man in south Armagh is being protected amid claims that he worked as an agent for British intelligence, according to usually reliable security sources.

The man, who has the official title of officer commanding South Armagh Brigade of the Provisional IRA, is also a member of the Northern Command, which effectively ran the organisation from the early 1980s.

Now it has been learned that the south Armagh 'OC' was outed as a tout earlier this year and that shortly afterwards an IRA bodyguard team was sent from Belfast to ensure that no attack was made on the man in order to save embarrassment for the organisation.


The dead man was Eamon Collins, 45, once a leading figure in the IRA. That was before he grew disenchanted with the movement, and turned informer, treachery punishable only by death. He pursued his fresh-found opposition to terrorism with such zeal that he knew that his time was limited.

Collins three years ago made a searing documentary of his life; went on to write Killing Rage, an autobiography which portrayed the IRA as incompetent drunken psychopaths rather than an honourable army of disciplined freedom fighters; and appeared last May in the libel court in Dublin, the key witness who exposed and humiliated Thomas Murphy, his former IRA superior.

 


Antóin Mac Comháin

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Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady
You don't even believe that.

Gavin Larmour, whose father John was shot dead by the IRA in a Belfast ice cream parlour in 1988, believes the killing was not properly investigated to protect a high-level republican informer.

He claimed that the senior Provisional, who sat on the IRA army council in the 1990s and is a former Belfast Brigade commander, was recruited as a police agent after detectives presented him with evidence that would have led to his conviction for the murder.
You don't believe that either.

Former IRA director of intelligence Kieran Conway said that the security agencies’ war against the IRA had broken it.

He said: “The attrition rate was just so appalling.

“The SAS, the British intelligence services were obviously in a position to intercept most operations.

“It was absolutely clear that we were losing if we hadn’t already lost the war and that it was time to cash in the chips.”
He was obviously referring to the 1970s?

Spotlight said that security and republican sources had told it that the Castlereagh break-in exposed so many agents that it “posed an impossible question: How could they kill them all?”.
Castlereagh break-in allowed to happen, says former PSNI Officer ... Several special officers had to move after security breach at Belfast police station in 2002

The dead man was Eamon Collins, 45, once a leading figure in the IRA. That was before he grew disenchanted with the movement, and turned informer, treachery punishable only by death. He pursued his fresh-found opposition to terrorism with such zeal that he knew that his time was limited.

Collins three years ago made a searing documentary of his life; went on to write Killing Rage
20'ish years ago?

I'm in the middle of writing a book called 'Social Media, Black Propaganda and the Working Class.' I've dedicated an entire chapter to you. Would you be interested in telling your side of the story?

On a serious note, what is the point of taking a number of unrelated incidents, as you have done, mashing them altogether and posting them on Pie? Is it boredom, comedy, journalism, history, or something more insidious?
 

Barroso

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It appears McMG had an unlikely guardian angel...

A former MI5 agent within Sinn Féin who was close to Martin McGuinness has said that the British repeatedly protected the future deputy first minister while he was a senior IRA figure.

Agent 3007
Agent 3007
It's a joke. Take the "3" away and you're left with Agent 007 - James Bond.
And you fell for it.
 

AhNowStop

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Poor wee insecure beneath the bridge is big into ex Ra men now it seems :rolleyes: 😂😂

God help the sad demented eejit
 

McSlaggart

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Messages
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It appears McMG had an unlikely guardian angel...

A former MI5 agent within Sinn Féin who was close to Martin McGuinness has said that the British repeatedly protected the future deputy first minister while he was a senior IRA figure.

Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady and heard him arguing furiously with IRA hardliner Ivor Bell who was unhappy that Sinn Féin was increasingly mopping up money and resources which otherwise would have gone to the IRA.

He also reveals that it was MI5 who acted to protect the senior Sinn Féin figure



Makes wan wonder did collusion defeat the ahem undefeated army...

The recent spotlight series highlighted an aspect of collusion that hasn't received quite the same level of attention as some, like most things related to the troubles there is more than one side to the Dirty War story...

The IRA was so compromised by informers at every level that it realised it had to give up violence and move towards politics, republican and senior intelligence figures have said.

Spotlight said that security and republican sources had told it that the Castlereagh break-in exposed so many agents that it “posed an impossible question: How could they kill them all?”.

Former IRA director of intelligence Kieran Conway said that the security agencies’ war against the IRA had broken it.

He said: “The attrition rate was just so appalling.

“The SAS, the British intelligence services were obviously in a position to intercept most operations.

“It was absolutely clear that we were losing if we hadn’t already lost the war and that it was time to cash in the chips.”


“My mother had trained as a nurse so if anybody [in the IRA] was injured and couldn’t go to hospital, they would be brought to her,” Shauna recalled.

’. She was missing for 15 days. They tortured her.

“It was born into us that we were republicans. You hated the army, you hated Protestants, you hated the Brits. The IRA was meant to be on your side; they were meant to protect you.

“I went round to the house of a local IRA man after my mother was killed. He had steel security gates at the bottom of his stairs. I must have been 14 or 15. He wouldn’t come out but his son, who was 18, did. I [hit] him. The next day, four or five guys in balaclavas came round and told me to get out of the area.”

-
“I’m a volunteer. My name is Joseph Mulhern. I’ve been working for the Special Branch this past three years.”
-
The dead have a habit of haunting Northern Irish politics.


Gavin Larmour, whose father John was shot dead by the IRA in a Belfast ice cream parlour in 1988, believes the killing was not properly investigated to protect a high-level republican informer.

He claimed that the senior Provisional, who sat on the IRA army council in the 1990s and is a former Belfast Brigade commander, was recruited as a police agent after detectives presented him with evidence that would have led to his conviction for the murder.



He gambled that Sinn Féin, by now engaged in the peace process, could not afford to admit publicly that he had been a spy. If so, it would undermine their official line that they had fought the British to an honourable draw.

Any such admission would provoke the rank and file into questioning whether the IRA had been pushed into peace, paralysed by the penetration of agents like him.



The second most senior IRA man in south Armagh is being protected amid claims that he worked as an agent for British intelligence, according to usually reliable security sources.

The man, who has the official title of officer commanding South Armagh Brigade of the Provisional IRA, is also a member of the Northern Command, which effectively ran the organisation from the early 1980s.

Now it has been learned that the south Armagh 'OC' was outed as a tout earlier this year and that shortly afterwards an IRA bodyguard team was sent from Belfast to ensure that no attack was made on the man in order to save embarrassment for the organisation.


The dead man was Eamon Collins, 45, once a leading figure in the IRA. That was before he grew disenchanted with the movement, and turned informer, treachery punishable only by death. He pursued his fresh-found opposition to terrorism with such zeal that he knew that his time was limited.

Collins three years ago made a searing documentary of his life; went on to write Killing Rage, an autobiography which portrayed the IRA as incompetent drunken psychopaths rather than an honourable army of disciplined freedom fighters; and appeared last May in the libel court in Dublin, the key witness who exposed and humiliated Thomas Murphy, his former IRA superior.


If the IRA was in such bad shape why did the British allow the IRA to keep blowing up the stock

 

death or glory

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Joined
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Messages
19,919
It appears McMG had an unlikely guardian angel...

A former MI5 agent within Sinn Féin who was close to Martin McGuinness has said that the British repeatedly protected the future deputy first minister while he was a senior IRA figure.

Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady and heard him arguing furiously with IRA hardliner Ivor Bell who was unhappy that Sinn Féin was increasingly mopping up money and resources which otherwise would have gone to the IRA.

He also reveals that it was MI5 who acted to protect the senior Sinn Féin figure



Makes wan wonder did collusion defeat the ahem undefeated army...

The recent spotlight series highlighted an aspect of collusion that hasn't received quite the same level of attention as some, like most things related to the troubles there is more than one side to the Dirty War story...

The IRA was so compromised by informers at every level that it realised it had to give up violence and move towards politics, republican and senior intelligence figures have said.

Spotlight said that security and republican sources had told it that the Castlereagh break-in exposed so many agents that it “posed an impossible question: How could they kill them all?”.

Former IRA director of intelligence Kieran Conway said that the security agencies’ war against the IRA had broken it.

He said: “The attrition rate was just so appalling.

“The SAS, the British intelligence services were obviously in a position to intercept most operations.

“It was absolutely clear that we were losing if we hadn’t already lost the war and that it was time to cash in the chips.”


“My mother had trained as a nurse so if anybody [in the IRA] was injured and couldn’t go to hospital, they would be brought to her,” Shauna recalled.

’. She was missing for 15 days. They tortured her.

“It was born into us that we were republicans. You hated the army, you hated Protestants, you hated the Brits. The IRA was meant to be on your side; they were meant to protect you.

“I went round to the house of a local IRA man after my mother was killed. He had steel security gates at the bottom of his stairs. I must have been 14 or 15. He wouldn’t come out but his son, who was 18, did. I [hit] him. The next day, four or five guys in balaclavas came round and told me to get out of the area.”

-
“I’m a volunteer. My name is Joseph Mulhern. I’ve been working for the Special Branch this past three years.”
-
The dead have a habit of haunting Northern Irish politics.


Gavin Larmour, whose father John was shot dead by the IRA in a Belfast ice cream parlour in 1988, believes the killing was not properly investigated to protect a high-level republican informer.

He claimed that the senior Provisional, who sat on the IRA army council in the 1990s and is a former Belfast Brigade commander, was recruited as a police agent after detectives presented him with evidence that would have led to his conviction for the murder.



He gambled that Sinn Féin, by now engaged in the peace process, could not afford to admit publicly that he had been a spy. If so, it would undermine their official line that they had fought the British to an honourable draw.

Any such admission would provoke the rank and file into questioning whether the IRA had been pushed into peace, paralysed by the penetration of agents like him.



The second most senior IRA man in south Armagh is being protected amid claims that he worked as an agent for British intelligence, according to usually reliable security sources.

The man, who has the official title of officer commanding South Armagh Brigade of the Provisional IRA, is also a member of the Northern Command, which effectively ran the organisation from the early 1980s.

Now it has been learned that the south Armagh 'OC' was outed as a tout earlier this year and that shortly afterwards an IRA bodyguard team was sent from Belfast to ensure that no attack was made on the man in order to save embarrassment for the organisation.


The dead man was Eamon Collins, 45, once a leading figure in the IRA. That was before he grew disenchanted with the movement, and turned informer, treachery punishable only by death. He pursued his fresh-found opposition to terrorism with such zeal that he knew that his time was limited.

Collins three years ago made a searing documentary of his life; went on to write Killing Rage, an autobiography which portrayed the IRA as incompetent drunken psychopaths rather than an honourable army of disciplined freedom fighters; and appeared last May in the libel court in Dublin, the key witness who exposed and humiliated Thomas Murphy, his former IRA superior.

Another great OP BTB.
You're not suggesting MMG was a British agent codenamed the fisherman, are you?
This is collusion on a massive scale between the Provo's and agents of the state.
 

Ardillaun

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If the British are willing to make a clean breast of what they did in NI, I am willing to listen. But we’re not exactly there yet, are we?
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
MI5 protected Martin McGuinness for years: “The school of thought personified by Alec got its way on 20 October 1982 when we started stealing votes...after thieving the polling cards of doctors, nurses and other medical staff from the local hospital we were voting early and often to put our ‘1’ and ‘2’ beside the Sinn Féin candidates on ballot papers. We even stole the votes of the nuns from the Good Shepherd Convent. During the 1981 Fermanagh and South Tyrone by-election in which IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands was elected as an MP, Mr Carlin said that there was massive voting fraud by Sinn Féin. I voted in nine different polling stations with cards that had been given to me in each area. Others claimed to have voted 15 or 16 times further up the country."

- DOG, do you think it's plausible that voting fraud could be committed up and down the country, in a by-election?
Ah yes. Heavily rumoured that that whole operation was called 'Operation Fianna Fail'', I seem to recall.
 

death or glory

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It's a book: 'In an autobiography published this week, Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady and heard him arguing furiously with IRA hardliner Ivor Bell who was unhappy that Sinn Féin was increasingly mopping up money and resources which otherwise would have gone to the IRA.



OK, but he's claiming the complete opposite: 'Mr Carlin said that he did not believe that Mr McGuinness was himself an agent.'



Northern Ireland Assembly Elections 1982: 'Sinn Féin scored the propaganda coup of Gerry Adams being the first candidate to be declared elected to the Assembly, but did not do well at translating seats into votes, with two narrow misses to Alliance in North and West Belfast and another to the DUP in Fermanagh-South Tyrone. In two of those three cases better balancing between the SF candidates would probably have secured an extra seat. All five of the Sinn Féin seats had been won by the SDLP in 1973, though two had been lost to Unionists in 1975.'

MI5 protected Martin McGuinness for years: “The school of thought personified by Alec got its way on 20 October 1982 when we started stealing votes...after thieving the polling cards of doctors, nurses and other medical staff from the local hospital we were voting early and often to put our ‘1’ and ‘2’ beside the Sinn Féin candidates on ballot papers. We even stole the votes of the nuns from the Good Shepherd Convent. During the 1981 Fermanagh and South Tyrone by-election in which IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands was elected as an MP, Mr Carlin said that there was massive voting fraud by Sinn Féin. I voted in nine different polling stations with cards that had been given to me in each area. Others claimed to have voted 15 or 16 times further up the country."

- DOG, do you think it's plausible that voting fraud could be committed up and down the country, in a by-election?

- Do you think Carlin has over-egged the pudding? That sounds like a lot of polling stations..



Claimed the British really wanted a UI in 1969. Carlin is claiming the complete opposite:

“He was very interested in how I thought Sinn Féin would do at the election and was absolutely over the moon when I told him of our plan to get Martin elected. Alec made it clear to me that it was imperative that ‘Martin McGuinness gets elected to the Northern Ireland Assembly’.
Off course voting fraud was committed up and down the country by Rebs in elections.
Do you think a party linked to sectarian murder and terrorism would baulk at electoral fraud?
 

Levellers

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Strange that when the new ID election law came into operation in the north of Ireland the votes of the SDLP and UUP fell and those of SF rose.
 

death or glory

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Strange that when the new ID election law came into operation in the north of Ireland the votes of the SDLP and UUP fell and those of SF rose.
Wow , what a concidence, you know what that word means.
 

between the bridges

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Another great OP BTB.
You're not suggesting MMG was a British agent codenamed the fisherman, are you?
This is collusion on a massive scale between the Provo's and agents of the state.
There still is, when the wall is started the flakers will be turning the first sod...
 

Ardillaun

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If a purely military solution had been pursued by the British, I suspect the Republican movement would have splintered further, with hardliners carrying on the conflict in a less organized, and more intractable, way. We have a mild version of this persisting until the present.
 

Barroso

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It's a book: 'In an autobiography published this week, Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady and heard him arguing furiously with IRA hardliner Ivor Bell who was unhappy that Sinn Féin was increasingly mopping up money and resources which otherwise would have gone to the IRA.
From the quotes on here, it sounds like a joke book.
There will certainly never be any proof that any of this actually happened.
Anyone could make up any story and have it printed, but that doesn't mean that it is real.
In fact, when an "agent" publishes his memoirs, you know they are lies, because their activities would be state secrets, and if they published a true account, they would be in breach of the official secrets act.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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From the quotes on here, it sounds like a joke book.
There will certainly never be any proof that any of this actually happened.
Anyone could make up any story and have it printed, but that doesn't mean that it is real.
In fact, when an "agent" publishes his memoirs, you know they are lies, because their activities would be state secrets, and if they published a true account, they would be in breach of the official secrets act.
I read Killing Rage but I won't be reading this one, because I can tell from the review that it's riddled with inaccuracies. There has always been a clear attempt to control the narrative of the conflict and I think the nearest anyone came to telling the truth was the Boston College project, because they interviewed a broad spectrum of participants, and the powers that be, moved heaven and earth to close it down. A lot of the material about the equivalent in the south, was penned 30-40 years after the Classical period of the WOI and Civil War. I think we're approaching a similar time frame with the north, but the material seems to resemble propaganda rather than history. It can be all too easy to forget, that history isn't the motive with everybody, and Carlins intention appears to be to attack the Republican narrative. The only 'revelation' I could glean from the recent spotlight documentary, is that the British intended to pull out of Ireland and supported a United Ireland in 1969. Perhaps some did, but the facts as we know them is that they didn't pull out, and that 'revelation' doesn't tally with the BBC Panorama documentary in 2013 in which British soldiers claimed they were sent here to instigate a Sectarian Civil War. One of the golden rules of propaganda is that 'It doesn't matter if it's true, so long as they believe it.'

It appears McMG had an unlikely guardian angel...
Panorama: Britain's Secret Terror Force, BBC One, Thursday 21 ...

If that's what a 'guardian angel' looks like, I'd hate to see what Nick the Divil looks like..
 

NMunsterman

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6,172
It appears McMG had an unlikely guardian angel...

A former MI5 agent within Sinn Féin who was close to Martin McGuinness has said that the British repeatedly protected the future deputy first minister while he was a senior IRA figure.

Agent 3007 reveals that he saw Mr McGuinness at an MI5 safe house in Limavady and heard him arguing furiously with IRA hardliner Ivor Bell who was unhappy that Sinn Féin was increasingly mopping up money and resources which otherwise would have gone to the IRA.

He also reveals that it was MI5 who acted to protect the senior Sinn Féin figure



Makes wan wonder did collusion defeat the ahem undefeated army...

The recent spotlight series highlighted an aspect of collusion that hasn't received quite the same level of attention as some, like most things related to the troubles there is more than one side to the Dirty War story...

The IRA was so compromised by informers at every level that it realised it had to give up violence and move towards politics, republican and senior intelligence figures have said.

Spotlight said that security and republican sources had told it that the Castlereagh break-in exposed so many agents that it “posed an impossible question: How could they kill them all?”.

Former IRA director of intelligence Kieran Conway said that the security agencies’ war against the IRA had broken it.

He said: “The attrition rate was just so appalling.

“The SAS, the British intelligence services were obviously in a position to intercept most operations.

“It was absolutely clear that we were losing if we hadn’t already lost the war and that it was time to cash in the chips.”


“My mother had trained as a nurse so if anybody [in the IRA] was injured and couldn’t go to hospital, they would be brought to her,” Shauna recalled.

’. She was missing for 15 days. They tortured her.

“It was born into us that we were republicans. You hated the army, you hated Protestants, you hated the Brits. The IRA was meant to be on your side; they were meant to protect you.

“I went round to the house of a local IRA man after my mother was killed. He had steel security gates at the bottom of his stairs. I must have been 14 or 15. He wouldn’t come out but his son, who was 18, did. I [hit] him. The next day, four or five guys in balaclavas came round and told me to get out of the area.”

-
“I’m a volunteer. My name is Joseph Mulhern. I’ve been working for the Special Branch this past three years.”
-
The dead have a habit of haunting Northern Irish politics.


Gavin Larmour, whose father John was shot dead by the IRA in a Belfast ice cream parlour in 1988, believes the killing was not properly investigated to protect a high-level republican informer.

He claimed that the senior Provisional, who sat on the IRA army council in the 1990s and is a former Belfast Brigade commander, was recruited as a police agent after detectives presented him with evidence that would have led to his conviction for the murder.



He gambled that Sinn Féin, by now engaged in the peace process, could not afford to admit publicly that he had been a spy. If so, it would undermine their official line that they had fought the British to an honourable draw.

Any such admission would provoke the rank and file into questioning whether the IRA had been pushed into peace, paralysed by the penetration of agents like him.



The second most senior IRA man in south Armagh is being protected amid claims that he worked as an agent for British intelligence, according to usually reliable security sources.

The man, who has the official title of officer commanding South Armagh Brigade of the Provisional IRA, is also a member of the Northern Command, which effectively ran the organisation from the early 1980s.

Now it has been learned that the south Armagh 'OC' was outed as a tout earlier this year and that shortly afterwards an IRA bodyguard team was sent from Belfast to ensure that no attack was made on the man in order to save embarrassment for the organisation.


The dead man was Eamon Collins, 45, once a leading figure in the IRA. That was before he grew disenchanted with the movement, and turned informer, treachery punishable only by death. He pursued his fresh-found opposition to terrorism with such zeal that he knew that his time was limited.

Collins three years ago made a searing documentary of his life; went on to write Killing Rage, an autobiography which portrayed the IRA as incompetent drunken psychopaths rather than an honourable army of disciplined freedom fighters; and appeared last May in the libel court in Dublin, the key witness who exposed and humiliated Thomas Murphy, his former IRA superior.


Translates as :

"I'm still bullin' that the sectarian Apartheid Northern statelet was destroyed - and our very best option was to be forced to share power with the very people who destroyed it".

In fairness, Ian Paisley had it sussed just like you have - but at least he admitted it :

"It was a sell-out of all that our fathers died for and all that we stood for"
- Ian Paisley on the GFA.

No worries Bridgey, you'll be grand in the Re-United Ireland.
 


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