Sinn Fein stance on the dealing of drugs?

JoseyWhales

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Throughout the 90's, one of Sinn Fein's major tools in garnering support in Dublin was its participation in the anti-drugs movement, Sinn Fein members were at the fore of the anti-drugs marches, in which drug dealers homes were targeted and picketed, on the back of this the IRA in the shadows took action against said drug dealers, were who exiled from communities, maimed even executed.
On the back of this Sinn Fein and the Provisionals gained trust among working class communities which in turn led to them establishing an electoral base which still exists to this day although far less established.

My question is, given that drug dealing and the madness attributed to it in its harming of communities is worse then ever, where are Sinn Fein in all this?
Why is there no repeat of the 90's, in which working class areas were encouraged to rally against drugs and march on the houses of those that sold them, or the Provisional movement engaging in its own activities to take action against these hoodlums?

What has changed now that Sinn Fein wont engage in anti-drug activism anymore?
Is it that Sinn Fein has seen some kind of light through its abandoning of revolutionary politics and participation in constitutionalism, and has joined the likes of Fianna Fail and Fine Gael now looks down on anti-drugs activists?

Is it that Sinn Fein has earned the respect of the British government, the 26-county establishment and that they are afraid of the scrutiny of breeching the terms on their ceasefire from engaging in such on-street militant activism.

Has Sinn Fein abandoned the working class people be refusing to adknowledge the drug crisis in any meaningful way and not using any of its clout to help?

Was all Sinn Fein and the Provisional movements bravado in the 90s just a ruse to build bridges electorally for future years in Dublin and other counties?
 


Aindriu

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SF's policy towards drug dealing used to be a bullet in the head of the dealers.
 

turdsl

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It now seems that Sinn Fein in both jurisdictions have decided with their respective electorate are now supporting the democratic and lawful route
 

fluffykontbiscuits

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Throughout the 90's, one of Sinn Fein's major tools in garnering support in Dublin was its participation in the anti-drugs movement, Sinn Fein members were at the fore of the anti-drugs marches, in which drug dealers homes were targeted and picketed, on the back of this the IRA in the shadows took action against said drug dealers, were who exiled from communities, maimed even executed.
On the back of this Sinn Fein and the Provisionals gained trust among working class communities which in turn led to them establishing an electoral base which still exists to this day although far less established.

My question is, given that drug dealing and the madness attributed to it in its harming of communities is worse then ever, where are Sinn Fein in all this?
Why is there no repeat of the 90's, in which working class areas were encouraged to rally against drugs and march on the houses of those that sold them, or the Provisional movement engaging in its own activities to take action against these hoodlums?

What has changed now that Sinn Fein wont engage in anti-drug activism anymore?
Is it that Sinn Fein has seen some kind of light through its abandoning of revolutionary politics and participation in constitutionalism, and has joined the likes of Fianna Fail and Fine Gael now looks down on anti-drugs activists?

Is it that Sinn Fein has earned the respect of the British government, the 26-county establishment and that they are afraid of the scrutiny of breeching the terms on their ceasefire from engaging in such on-street militant activism.

Has Sinn Fein abandoned the working class people be refusing to adknowledge the drug crisis in any meaningful way and not using any of its clout to help?

Was all Sinn Fein and the Provisional movements bravado in the 90s just a ruse to build bridges electorally for future years in Dublin and other counties?
The hilarious thing is that the provisionals themselves were only sticking a bit of lead behind the ear of the drug dealers so they could muscle in themselves on the space created by the dealers. http://www.politics.ie/current-affairs/140428-disciplined-vigilantes-assist-gardai-tackling-antisocial-behaviour.html?highlight=drugs refers to this as I posted......Sinn Fein and IRA intertwined ...
 

mickdotcom

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SF's policy towards drug dealing used to be a bullet in the head of the dealers.
The problem was that some sinn fein / ira members started getting

FF Galway Racecourse tent freindly with the drug dealers

and became part of the problem.
 
Last edited:

Dentist

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SF Justice spokeman Aengus O'Snodaigh is the only Justice spokesman of any party in the Dail coming up with realistic ideas on how to tackle drugs and social problems within communities. Why is this?? its because Aengus is from and still lives in a community that has problems with antisocial behavior, a lot of justice spokesmen and in particular judges are that far removed from normal society that they have no clue on how to tackle problems and are only adding to it and are completely out of touch with society and how these communities work.
We need to be more ruthless with gangs in this country before we end up like Mexico where the gangs are more weapons than the police/army are running the show.
 

mickdotcom

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SF Justice spokeman Aengus O'Snodaigh is the only Justice spokesman of any party in the Dail coming up with realistic ideas on how to tackle drugs and social problems within communities. Why is this?? its because Aengus is from and still lives in a community that has problems with antisocial behavior, a lot of justice spokesmen and in particular judges are that far removed from normal society that they have no clue on how to tackle problems and are only adding to it and are completely out of touch with society and how these communities work.
We need to be more ruthless with gangs in this country before we end up like Mexico where the gangs are more weapons than the police/army are running the show.
He is also the only Justice spokesman with his own independent gang of enforcers

SF man chief suspect in killing

Jim Cusack

THE chief suspect in the murder of a man in a Dublin pub last Sunday night is a well-known IRA man who doubles as a Sinn Fein election activist and has worked for TD Aengus O Snodaigh.

Seven of O Snodaigh's other election workers were jailed for IRA membership last November and December after gardai thwarted an attempted lorry hijacking and uncovered an IRA spying ring aimed at Dail members.

Detectives investigating the murder of Jim Curran were yesterday searching for the suspect who, local people say, disappeared from the area immediately after the killing.

According to local people, the Sinn Fein activist is highly placed in the republican organisation and is close friends with Pearse McCauley, one of the men convicted of the manslaughter of Det Garda Jerry McCabe. Another close associate is former IRA prisoner Nessan Quinlivan who was extradited to Britain on explosives charges in the Nineties.

Yesterday, detectives investigating the murder raided a house belonging to a SF election worker in their search for the chief suspect.

Three people were arrested and released after questioning during the week and gardai are understood to have received a number of eye witness statements to the incident in which Mr Curran, 47, a father of one, was shot in the head at point blank range.

Local people said Mr Curran had gone to the Green Lizard pub for a quiet drink. He had been involved in a dispute with an IRA man. A man in his mid-40s who had been drinking in the pub calmly walked up behind Mr Curran and shot him three times in full view of about 30 people. The man then walked out.

Mr Curran had previously spoken out about the fact that local IRA figures were involved in taking "protection" money from well-known drug dealers in the south inner city. In return for these payments the IRA allow the dealers to continue with their evil business.

Unlike the murder of Robert McCartney by the IRA in Belfast, a number of witnesses have come forward.

Sunday Independent 10th April, 2005
and even more good news on Aengus and his merry hooded men;

THE Liberties in Dublin is like the Markets area of Belfast in more ways that one.

Both areas have a tradition of street and market trading; both are close knit communities; both areas have populations that have endured economic hardship and have populations that are renowned for their enterprise and endurance.

Both areas are also afflicted by crime and drugs - and both areas have local mafias who believe they can kill with impunity. In both areas, the local mafia is the IRA.

The similarities are not only broad, they are particular. On Sunday, January 30, the IRA in the Markets area killed Robert McCartney, a father of two boys who happened to have incurred the wrath of the local IRA boss. The murder happened outside a packed pub.

Last Sunday, the head of the IRA in the Liberties shot dead Jim Curran, a well-respected local man and father-of-one who was also unafraid of the IRA mafia. The murder also happened in a pub where the IRA in the area were drinking.

The reason for Mr Curran's murder is unclear. However, it is known that the IRA boss - who doubles as a Sinn Fein election worker - hated the 42-year-old champion kickboxer.

Neighbours said it is possible that Mr Curran had taunted the IRA men for taking money from heroin dealers.

There was an incident in another pub in the area after Christmas, in which two IRA members were similarly taunted for openly taking cash from heroin dealers. Gardai are trying to establish if it was Mr Curran who taunted two IRA men, both of whom were former leading "anti-drugs" vigilantes in the south inner city.

Whatever the reason, Jim Curran made the fatal mistake of going for a quiet drink in the Green Lizard pub last Sunday night, apparently oblivious to the fact that there was a small group of IRA men on the premises.

According to local people, one of the IRA men left shortly after Curran entered the bar and returned about half an hour later. It is believed he went off to collect a gun and delivered it to the head of the IRA in the area, who had been drinking in the bar.

The IRA boss then calmly got up out of his seat, walked up behind Jim Curran and shot him in the head. He then fired another two shots into his head as he lay slumped on the floor.

The IRA man made no attempt to conceal his identity. He walked from the bar and went into hiding.

As in the case of Robert McCartney's murder outside Magennis's bar in Belfast city centre, almost everyone in the Liberties knows what happened in the Green Lizard last Sunday night.

Unlike Belfast, however, the people of the Liberties are prepared to speak. Although gardai will not confirm if they have witnesses at this stage, it is understood they have eye-witness evidence that could lead to an arrest and charge.

Last Monday, gardai arrested an associate of the IRA man who was known to have been in the bar, but it is understood he told them he saw nothing. A female relative of the IRA man was also arrested. Both were later released without charge.

Another suspected eye witness was arrested on Friday morning as gardai searched for the murder weapon, which has still to be found.

The murder of a popular figure like Jim Curran has exposed what people in the Liberties say is a local IRA which has turned into a crime syndicate. They say the IRA men responsible are, like the members of the gang that killed Mr McCartney, "scum".

One woman said that the weekend before Mr Curran was murdered, the local IRA boss had groped a girl in the Green Lizard and had then made an issue of offering an apology which he felt was not accepted properly.

"He's filth," the woman said, adding that the IRA boss and his gang, including members of his immediate family, have terrorised the local community for a generation.

"They're called the hammer gang, here," she said, a reference used by other community members, and which relates to the belief that the IRA man and his henchmen used hammers to attack victims.

The IRA boss is loathed and feared in equal measure. Ten years ago he led a gang which attacked and savagely beat his own sister after her son was accused of dealing drugs. They beat the woman mercilessly, fracturing her ribs.

He is also reputed to have tortured a young local woman - again accused of drug dealing - with a lighter. The woman and her partner were forced out of their home, which was subsequently handed over to another well-known IRA figure.

The IRA man who shot Jim Curran is said to have become rich through providing "protection" for selected and well-known drug dealers.

His nephew - the same man whose mother was beaten - is a one of the biggest drug dealers in the south inner city, and plies his trade with apparent impunity. The IRA in the Liberties has switched from anti-drugs activism to "protectors" of drug dealers, in the same way that the Provos in the North have changed from full-time terrorists to full-time gangsters.

During the Eighties, south Dublin vigilantes terrorised local drug addicts and dealers, eventually killing a six-stone, HIV-infected addict, Josey Dwyer, in a drink-fuelled mob beating.

Twelve men were arrested but after Dwyer's best friend and witness to the killing, Alan Byrne, was shot in the back, other witnesses backed off for fear of their lives.

Byrne survived to testify but subsequently had to leave Dublin because of well-founded fears he would be murdered. Only three of the accused received jails sentences, one for manslaughter and two for violent disorder.

Sinn Fein party leaders Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness visited the area after the killing of Dwyer and attended a meeting in a local community hall.

http://www.unison.ie/irish_independe...issue_id=12319

Why dont shame fein at least be honest and admit they have problems

with a criminal element within their membership;
 

Dentist

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mickdotcom.. ah yes Robert McCartney, Jospeh Rafferty, Jim Curran etc. This guy you're article talks about is a man who was active the 80's. His nephew is a drug dealer that much is true, his niece goes out with one of the biggest drug dealers in the south city.. lets just say he's Fat and regularly features in the Herald. People like yourself seem to link crime from ex IRA members to Sinn Fein too easy, you see lines that dont exist
 

Johnnybaii

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I think my irony meter just exploded!!

Anecdotally my experience of SF’s policy on drugs was that they were clearing room in the market for their own dealers and ‘approved’ dealers ie paying a cut/tax to the IRA. We are talking about people who consider murdering and bombing acceptable ‘fund raising activity’ after all.


The fact that they mobilize what you term the “resistance” against ‘legal highs’ while you can buy crack or heroin in 5 minutes on an Irish City street corner speaks volumes about where their current priorities lie.
 

cain1798

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It's an interesting post Josey makes but there's a couple of things to be clear on.

Firstly, and I know Josey doesn't say it outright but it's important to be clear, the anti-drugs movement of the 90s was not some sort of republican front or Sinn Féin master plan. It came from within working class communities. Republicans certainly got involved very quickly and did play a leading role in the campaign but as Andre Lyder's very good book on the subject makes clear, it wasn't some sort of 'provo front' as a lot of people described it.

Secondly, one of the advantages anti-drugs activists had in the 90s was the perception among drug dealers (whether they were justified in holding it or not) that if they attacked anti-drug activists the IRA would respond. Rightly or wrong, the existence of the threat of the IRA served as a kind of shield for anti-drugs activists, of all parties and none, to march up to a drug dealers house and order him out. Things are different now.

I live in a constituency with a serious drugs problem. We know where the dealers live. We could, in theory, march on them. And when I walk out of my flat one evening and find the dealer and his friends waiting for me, no doubt anxious to discuss drug rehabilitation strategies, it's a very, very lonely place.

What Sinn Féin is involved in is pushing the Dial to Stop Drug Dealing initiative, which we prioritised as a campaign issues, working on the Joint Policing Committees to get the gardaí into areas with high levels of drug dealing, campaigning to try and keep drug rehabilitation projects going.

I doubt there's another party in Dublin as seriously concerned about the drugs issue, not because we're just great (though, admittedly, we are), but because many of our members and activists got involved in the party through their anti-drugs activism and they ensure it's still a party priority.

Speaking as a member, nothing would please me more than if the party was to help pushing dealers out. Thing is, what do you do when they push back?

On the head shops, I actually wasn't hugely convinced we had the right approach to that one. Am about 50/50 on it. I can tell you the reaction from people passing the pickets on the head shops was phenomenal.
 

fluffykontbiscuits

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mickdotcom.. ah yes Robert McCartney, Jospeh Rafferty, Jim Curran etc. This guy you're article talks about is a man who was active the 80's. His nephew is a drug dealer that much is true, his niece goes out with one of the biggest drug dealers in the south city.. lets just say he's Fat and regularly features in the Herald. People like yourself seem to link crime from ex IRA members to Sinn Fein too easy, you see lines that dont exist
Only line that exists is a line of coke the RA supplied to the youngsters once they ousted the drug dealers. Goes without saying, reference my earlier post I put up and see the links I posted about the links between drug dealing and the IRA....
 

Skin

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Only line that exists is a line of coke the RA supplied to the youngsters once they ousted the drug dealers. Goes without saying, reference my earlier post I put up and see the links I posted about the links between drug dealing and the IRA....
As an idea, to guage the level of involvement the IRA had in drug dealing would be to research the number of people who have been convicted as IRA members that also have convictions for drug dealing.

I heard an estimation once that circa 10,000 people went through the prisons North and South for activities related to the conflict. How many were IRA and how many of them were convicted for drug offences also?
 

Tomaldo

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Drug-dealing would stop almost immediately if users stopped buying their products, but they won't 'cos there's enjoyment from these highs. Sinn Fein and others should remember that their intolerance of the drugs culture is making the situation worse (no quality control of the substances, gangland activity etc.) It's not only poor vulnerable teenagers who take the stuff, it's also high-achieving adults (Keith Richards, Elton John, Paul McCartney, Ben Dunne and so on)
 

Dentist

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As an idea, to guage the level of involvement the IRA had in drug dealing would be to research the number of people who have been convicted as IRA members that also have convictions for drug dealing.

I heard an estimation once that circa 10,000 people went through the prisons North and South for activities related to the conflict. How many were IRA and how many of them were convicted for drug offences also?
precisely my point, its a Sunday Worldesque myth that the IRA are involved in drug dealing, its all part of a wider plan to link the IRA and Sinn Fein then attach drug dealing so it hurts Sinn Fein electorally
 

mickdotcom

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What Sinn Féin is involved in is pushing the Dial to Stop Drug Dealing initiative, which we prioritised as a campaign issues, working on the Joint Policing Committees to get the gardaí into areas with high levels of drug dealing, campaigning to try and keep drug rehabilitation projects going.

I doubt there's another party in Dublin as seriously concerned about the drugs issue, not because we're just great (though, admittedly, we are), but because many of our members and activists got involved in the party through their anti-drugs activism and they ensure it's still a party priority.

Speaking as a member, nothing would please me more than if the party was to help pushing dealers out. Thing is, what do you do when they push back?

On the head shops, I actually wasn't hugely convinced we had the right approach to that one. Am about 50/50 on it. I can tell you the reaction from people passing the pickets on the head shops was phenomenal.

I actually can empathise with you - as I also came out the same sort of front door- however you can see the suspicions a lot of people have (whether they are unfounded or not) in associating Sinn Fein with drugs,

Basically what I am saying is that where its great that Sinn Fein members like you see the dangers posed to our society by the scourge of drugs and living in the areas, like me you can see the individual damage and pain drugs cause,

however there is a hell of a lot of us ( and no doubt your own members) realise that the ira and some of its more illustrious criminal members made a lot of money out of the drugs trades and consequently on the backs of the most vunerable members of our society.

If Sinn Fein were to reorganise like the banks and have clean Sinn Fein of lads like you and others with clean hands- and then dirty shame fein full of the scum murderers criminals, drug dealers/protectionists etc- maybe then I would listen.


PS- FG- FF- Labour etc should all get rid of their criminals - (out you go Bertie)
 

Skin

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I actually can empathise with you - as I also came out the same sort of front door- however you can see the suspicions a lot of people have (whether they are unfounded or not) in associating Sinn Fein with drugs,

Basically what I am saying is that where its great that Sinn Fein members like you see the dangers posed to our society by the scourge of drugs and living in the areas, like me you can see the individual damage and pain drugs cause,

however there is a hell of a lot of us ( and no doubt your own members) realise that the ira and some of its more illustrious criminal members made a lot of money out of the drugs trades and consequently on the backs of the most vunerable members of our society.

If Sinn Fein were to reorganise like the banks and have clean Sinn Fein of lads like you and others with clean hands- and then dirty shame fein full of the scum murderers criminals, drug dealers/protectionists etc- maybe then I would listen.


PS- FG- FF- Labour etc should all get rid of their criminals - (out you go Bertie)
There is an obvious contradiction in what you are saying. Firstly you are saying that there are "suspicions" of SF involvement in drugs. You state that they may or may not be "unfounded". There is obvious doubt in your statement as to whether or SF are involved in drugs.
Then you state as fact "a lot of us realise" that the IRA "made a lot of money out of drugs".

it is incomprehensible in my mind that while SF were beating the "dealers out" path, that close associates were involved in driving the dealers out by force if necessary, and at the same time were engaged in drug dealing!!!.

Think about it, IRA man sells drugs, anti-drug march appears on his house supported by SF. Drug dealer refuses to go, so IRA man orders a hit on IRA man. The hitman, is supported by SF members who provide him with cover and a safe house obtained from the proceeds of drug dealing!!! Its madness gone beserk!!
 

Murph

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Take it easy there skin -that might be too much for Mickdot to take in in one go.
He might have to take some time to think about it -in between reading the sunday world!
 


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