Slavish assimilation of foreign linguistic errors.



Cellachán Chaisil

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Mar 3, 2009
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9,841
I do be
You do be
We all do be
They do be
Yissers do be
Heresy.

Yisser is the possessive pronoun/adjective in the 2nd person plural.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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Circa 1998 - Dublin City Centre:

Tourist to moi: Is this like...O'Connell Street?

Moi to tourist: Yes, it is! Actually, it is O'Connell Street - hence the resemblance.
Shouldov assed him if he'd seen The Kelly Book.
 
O

Oscurito

One of the things which doesn't help is the manner in which some UK newspapers Americanise much of their output in order to garner traffic in the US.

Here's an example from the Mail:

emphasis mine.
I'm not against all American linguistic imports. Lately, I have begun to use "I have gotten" instead of "I have got". It just sounds better and, I think it's important to distinguish the preterite (I got) from the present perfect (I have gotten).

Also, remember that verbs derived from the verb "to get" still use the ~gotten format.
I have forgotten my password
not
I have forgot my password

See also "beget",
 

Feckkit

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...If you were occupying a seat on a bus last night then you "were sitting on the bus". You were not "sat" on the bus - unless, of course, you're a toddler or someone with a disability who requires someone else to physically sit/place them on the seat...
FAIL!



 
O

Oscurito

if i order a Salmon panini and an almond croissant in my local coffee shop....i must pronounce the silent L or be stared at blankly
I'm going to be a total pedant here and point out that panini is plural.

If you're only ordering one, it should be a panino.

*runs and hides*

EDIT:
I see that A Voice has already made this point.
 
O

Oscurito

In Australia, it is not uncommon to hear people pronounce pronunciation pronounce-ee-ayshen. Which a certain Ms. Morrisette probably wouldn't have called ironic as she clearly doesn't understand the word's meaning.

Also, Police have their own special way of speaking to the press. Instead of saying "The suspect broke into an adjoining property and assaulted the owner" they'll say "The suspect has broken into an adjoining property and has assaulted the owner." Does anyone know the correct term for this abomination?
Good question. Maybe the use of the present perfect gives the whole story a sort of breaking-newsy, this-is-happening-now feel.

We have something called Templemore-speak - a convoluted and overly officious way of using the English language beloved of our Gardai.

So, for example, instead of saying, "I couldn't get in.", they'll say, "I was unable to gain access to the premises". :cool:
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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Oscurito is a diminutive of the Spanish adjective, oscuro which means "dark".

So, oscurito means "small and dark".
So you chose a user name that has the same characteristics as your mickey?
 

'orebel

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Nov 13, 2009
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O

Oscurito

I don't see the issue.

Sit has become transitive. So of course you can be sat down in the same way you can sit yourself somewhere.
The verb "to sit" always did have that transitive side to it. So, for a example one can say that "The father sat the toddler in the cot". But it's clear who is performing the verb and whom the verb is being performed on - the direct object. That's what you need for a transitive verb.

You don't get that with "I was sat". What's the direct object in that example?



(Of course it was quite common in earlier forms of the language for a vowel difference to separate intransitive and causative/transitive forms of a verb, hence lie => lay, sit => set drip => drop rise => raise).
Interesting point. I have a theory related to this that I might do a thread on.
 

'orebel

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At least it was his own and not hers. :)
I added that to make it look even more ridiculous.

Like, seriously? - I found 'píotsa' in an Osbourne Irish/English picture book someone gave to one of the kids.

Amazeballs!
 
O

Oscurito

Languages are living organisms and are the way people speak/sing them rather than any grammatical book advice!
But the primary reason for speaking a language is to communicate and be understood. So why choose to speak in a way that will lead to confusion?
 


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