Sligo Travellers want to rename halting site The Gaza Strip.



Wascurito

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Wadn't is the Cant for for what's not. I presume that Wad is the word for What. You maybe familiar with other words such as Me - My, 'til - Until, 'Pose - Supposed, etc. Bad English or unique culture worth preserving, which will help the Communi'y get from A to B, and into the 21st century? It's no wonder that they are impoverished, and stuck in shíttty little Halting Sites, that none of the Liberals or Marxists peddling that crap as a unique ethnic culture, will ever have to live in.
There's far more to Cant (aka Shelta) than bad English. Some of the words have histories going back centuries.

http://www.politics.ie/forum/culture-community/194711-wonders-shelta.html
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Sgaoi an Cheò

Fadó, fadó, san sean-tír, bhí slua d'na Fianna suite síos don óiche, taobh le Sgaoi an Cheò, tar éis lá fada sgianacht. Taobh amuigh de na cian bin, bhí tur breá mór ag caitheamh é fhéin anuas i dtreo na leasg dailean, a bhí bailithe taobh leis an leasg tom, is bhí drocan's na cheamban i mbilidh uilig lucht na Liaogach Charmadrachd..

'Guisean. Guisean', a dúirt Fionn, le mailc amháin ar bilidh a giofan, agus an mailc eile ar an tearlasg a bhí ag suí sa grobaid-chrios timpeall a chuid dramhaíola, agus é ag faire ar an caran beag, a bhí ag druidim go mall i dtreo bruach na habhann..

Oisn i dTír na Liaogach

Tháinig sé ar an Giofan bán
Ó Tír na Liaogach leis fhéin,
An Glomhach a d’fhág na Fianna tráth
Is d’imigh leis i gcéin.

Trí chéad bliain a chaith sé ann
Is ag dul in óige a bhí,
Cé go raibh na Fianna blianta
San uaigh ina luí.

“Ná tar anuas den Giofan
Nó beidh tú sean, a stór,
Tá na blianta fada caite
Ó chuala Fionn do ghlór.”

Le comhairle Niamh níor éist
An fear ar an Giofan bán,
Is é a bhí óg is láidir
Mar a bhí nuair a d’fhág sé slán.

Oisín an té a tháinig
Is a thit dá Giofan bán,
A d’athraigh ina sheanfhear lag
Tar éis na gcéadta ar fán.
There's far more to Cant (aka Shelta) than bad English. Some of the words have histories going back centuries.

http://www.politics.ie/forum/culture-community/194711-wonders-shelta.html

An Glomach

Yea, it also has some bad Gaelic. Can you pick out the Shelta words in the above poem and extract? An Glomhach is one such word, which means simply Man. (Alt. An Glomach).
 

Wascurito

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1200px-Scotland_Falls_of_Glomach.jpg
An Glomach

Yea, it also has some bad Gaelic. Can you pick out the Shelta words in the above poem and extract? An Glomach is one such word, which means simply Man.
Giofan looks like Shelta although in the above context it should mean "capall" or "horse"....?

Anyway, it's not "bad Gaelic". For example, there was a deliberate tendency to take two syllable words and switch around the initial and middle consonant. For example, the word for road (tobar) comes from "bót[h]ar", the word for girl (lac(k)in) is formed similarly from "cailín".

There were other methods too. It's a fascinating topic. But I really need to go to sleep here. Muni kon!
 

Alan Alda

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Antóin Mac Comháin

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Fadó, fadó, bhí an spéir agus an domhan cosúil le fear agus bean chéile. Bhí cúig leanaí acu:

Ghrian, Leasg Tom, Tur, Sgaoi, Cheò.

Nuair a d'fhás an Ghrian suas, coróinigh ina Rí é, agus lá amháin chuaigh sé ag guilm a dheirfiúr Leasg Tom timpeall na leasg dailean. Lá amháin shéid an ghaoth uile-cumhachtach orthu, agus bhí siad scartha go deo. Is as sin a tháinig an Lucht Siúil.

Translation:

Once upon a time, the sky and the earth were as one like man and wife. They had five children:

Sun, Moon, Fire, Water, Mist.

When the Sun grew up, he was crowned king, and one day he went courting his sister the Moon around the stars. The all-powerful wind blew at them, and they were separated forever. This is where the Traveling people came from.'

Sgaoi an Cheò - The Waters of the Ceo

Fadó, fadó, san sean-tír, bhí slua d'na Fianna suite síos don óiche, taobh le Sgaoi an Cheò, tar éis lá fada sgianacht. Taobh amuigh de na cian bin, bhí tur breá mór ag caitheamh é fhéin anuas i dtreo na leasg dailean, a bhí bailithe taobh leis an leasg tom, is bhí drocan's na cheamban i mbilidh uilig lucht na Liaogach Charmadrachd..

'Guisean. Guisean', a dúirt Fionn, le mailc amháin ar bilidh a giofan, agus an mailc eile ar an tearlasg a bhí ag suí sa grobaid-chrios timpeall a chuid dramhaíola, agus é ag faire ar an caran beag, a bhí ag druidim go mall i dtreo bruach na habhann..

Translation:

A long, long time ago, in the old country, a group of the Fianna had sat down for the night, on the banks of the waters of the Ceo, after a long day hunting. Outside the tents, a great fire was lifting itself towards the stars, that were gathered beside the moon, and songs and pipes where in the mouths of all the Young Warriors..

''Shush, shush'' said Fionn, with one hand on the mouth of his horse, and the other hand on the knife which sat in the pocket-belt which hung around his waist, as he watched the little boat, which was drifting towards the river bank..

Oisn i dTír na Liaogach

Tháinig sé ar an Giofan bán
Ó Tír na Liaogach leis fhéin,
An Glomhach a d’fhág na Fianna tráth
Is d’imigh leis i gcéin.

Trí chéad bliain a chaith sé ann
Is ag dul in óige a bhí,
Cé go raibh na Fianna blianta
San uaigh ina luí.

“Ná tar anuas den Giofan
Nó beidh tú sean, a stór,
Tá na blianta fada caite
Ó chuala Fionn do ghlór.”

Le comhairle Niamh níor éist
An fear ar an Giofan bán,
Is é a bhí óg is láidir
Mar a bhí nuair a d’fhág sé slán.

Oisín an té a tháinig
Is a thit dá Giofan bán,
A d’athraigh ina sheanfhear lag
Tar éis na gcéadta ar fán.

Translation:

Oisin in the Land of Youth

He came upon a white horse
From the land of the ever young
The man who left the Fianna
And went upon his way

300 years he spent ther
And remained forever young
Although for many years the Fianna
Had lain in their graves

''Don't get off your white horse
Or you'll grow old my love
So many years have passed
Since Fionn has heard your voice''

Niamhs advice was ignored
By the man on the white horse
He who was young and strong
When he had went away

Oisin the man who came
And fell from his white horse
Who changed into an old man
After so many years away
Bagail chaim - Moving towards
Bilidh - Mouth
Caran beag - Little boat
Cheamban - Pipes
Cheò - Mist
Chrios - Belt
Cian Bin - Tents
Dearc - Look
Drocan - Song
Giofan - Horse
Glomhach - Man
Grobaid - Pocket
Grobaid-chrios - Pocket-belt
Guisean - Quiet, Shussh
Leasg Dailean - Stars
Leasg Tom - Moon
Liaogach Charmadrachd - Young Warriors
Mailc - Hand
Sgaoi an Cheò - The River Coe
Sgaoi - Water
Sgianacht - Fishing, Hunting
Tearlasg - Knife
Tur - Fire

Giofan looks like Shelta although in the above context it should mean "capall" or "horse"....?
Yes it does. I have incorporated the Shelta words into the poem, which I believe may be one of the lost poems of Seosamh Mac Grianna, (It was published by An Gúm with an unknown author), and also into the short creation story, and the extract from another story which is my own. Oisins Cave is located in the mountains above the River Coe. The logic behind it, is to make it compatible with Traveler culture. There’s approximately 2-300 words remaining of the dialect, so there is absolutely no possibilty of reviving it as a separate dialect or langauge, in the same way that Cornish and Manx have been revived. It’s just an example of what can be done.

- It is actually that easy to incorporate what remains of the Traveler Gaelic dialect into modern Gaelic?

- The Travelers who have evolved from the Land Clearances, the Conquest and the Great Hunger, aren't actually interested in preserving the culture and tradition of Allidh Dall Stewart and Seosamh Mac Grianna?

And this is why I asked both of these questions in the same post. It actually is that simple. The answer to the second question, is that none of the Travelers I have met spoke Gaelic or the Shelta dialect.
 

Wascurito

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Bagail chaim - Moving towards
Bilidh - Mouth
Caran beag - Little boat
Cheamban - Pipes
Cheò - Mist
Chrios - Belt
Cian Bin - Tents
Dearc - Look
Drocan - Song
Giofan - Horse
Glomhach - Man
Grobaid - Pocket
Grobaid-chrios - Pocket-belt
Guisean - Quiet, Shussh
Leasg Dailean - Stars
Leasg Tom - Moon
Liaogach Charmadrachd - Young Warriors
Mailc - Hand
Sgaoi an Cheò - The River Coe
Sgaoi - Water
Sgianacht - Fishing, Hunting
Tearlasg - Knife
Tur - Fire



Yes it does. I have incorporated the Shelta words into the poem, which I believe may be one of the lost poems of Seosamh Mac Grianna, (It was published by An Gúm with an unknown author), and also into the short creation story, and the extract from another story which is my own. Oisins Cave is located in the mountains above the River Coe. The logic behind it, is to make it compatible with Traveler culture. There’s approximately 2-300 words remaining of the dialect, so there is absolutely no possibilty of reviving it as a separate dialect or langauge, in the same way that Cornish and Manx have been revived. It’s just an example of what can be done.

- It is actually that easy to incorporate what remains of the Traveler Gaelic dialect into modern Gaelic?

- The Travelers who have evolved from the Land Clearances, the Conquest and the Great Hunger, aren't actually interested in preserving the culture and tradition of Allidh Dall Stewart and Seosamh Mac Grianna?

And this is why I asked both of these questions in the same post. It actually is that simple. The answer to the second question, is that none of the Travelers I have met spoke Gaelic or the Shelta dialect.
Crios (for belt) isn't Shelta. It's standard Irish as is "ceo" and "dearc". Also, the word I've come across used for hand is "máile" being based on "lámh" - or rather the version of the word that existed in Irish centuries ago before the 'm' became lenited to the softer consonant we know today.

Shelta is the sort of language that never had much constancy about it. It's always been evolving, always borrowing words from the dominant language and changing them around. So, it doesn't surprise me that few Travellers today speak the version that was documented 100-150 years ago.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Crios (for belt) isn't Shelta. It's standard Irish as is "ceo" and "dearc". Also, the word I've come across used for hand is "máile" being based on "lámh" - or rather the version of the word that existed in Irish centuries ago before the 'm' became lenited to the softer consonant we know today.

Shelta is the sort of language that never had much constancy about it. It's always been evolving, always borrowing words from the dominant language and changing them around. So, it doesn't surprise me that few Travellers today speak the version that was documented 100-150 years ago.
''Dearc'' is is the Shelta dictionary of the Timothy Neat book, the Summer Walkers. It's actually spelled ''Deirc.'' ''Bag Chaim'' to me is bad Gaelic spoken backwards: ''Gab' amach''. Same way as ''Innis'' is badly spoken English, and if the ancient system of communication was being used, Ennis would be ''Nisen''. We'll have to agree to disagree on what Shelta is.
 

Wascurito

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''Dearc'' is is the Shelta dictionary of the Timothy Neat book, the Summer Walkers. It's actually spelled ''Deirc.'' ''Bag Chaim'' to me is bad Gaelic spoken backwards: ''Gab' amach''. Same way as ''Innis'' is badly spoken English, and if the ancient system of communication was being used, Ennis would be ''Nisen''. We'll have to agree to disagree on what Shelta is.
There's unlikely to be one precise definition as to what constitutes Shelta so no-one can claim to be completely correct. It's a fine point I'm trying to make but to refer to Shelta words as "bad Irish" or "bad English" may give the impression that the users simply don't know the correct way to say them - in the same that some people might say "I seen" instead of "I saw".

Shelta users invariably did and do know how to use the word the correct way. The distortion is systematic and deliberate. That's the whole point of the language and you sound well-informed enough already to know the reasons for that.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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Theres a lot more to Travellers in general, which is why its sad they are demanding to be 'separate' from their fellow Irishmen and women. Donegal fishermen and Kerry shepherds are 'different' and fascinating also. Not a separate ethnicity tho.
the whole 'Traveller culture' made sense in the ireland of one or two hundred years ago. Living in tiny wagons, moving from town to town, repairing cookery pots, the proverboal 'tinker' is a real historic phenomenon.

today we have a Welfare State, a compensation culture, an expectation of mass public education, social housing, etc etc.....and its all opened up a pandora's box of problems and anti-social behaviour. 'travellers' dont even travel anymore. The evidence is that the 'settled' community move house more frequently than travellers moving halting site. You can have a whole block of flats somewhere posh like 'Grand Canal Dock' and all the twentysomethings are in and out in just a couple of years.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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It's standard Irish as is "ceo" and "dearc".
Sgaoi an Cheò - The Waters of the Ceo. Ceo is the name of a river in Scotland.

Shelta users invariably did and do know how to use the word the correct way. The distortion is systematic and deliberate. That's the whole point of the language and you sound well-informed enough already to know the reasons for that.
Sha Jah Jah

Sha, Sha, Jah Jah
Mi Toke-Wan-Mór
Sha Sha Jah Jah
Mi 'n' Mé Toke-Wan-Mòr

Yea, Yea, Jah Jah
I Toke-One-More
Yea, Yea, Jah Jah
I 'n' I Toke-One-More

Dictionary:

Jah - Jah
Mé - I (Irish Gaelic)
Mi - I (Scottish Gaelic)
Mi 'n' Mé - I & I* (Scottish Gaelic, English, Irish Gaelic)
Mór - Big (Irish Gaelic)
Mòr - Big (Scottish Gaelic)
Sha - Yes (Phonetic Irish Gaelic)
Toke - The act of inhaling cannabis
Wan - One (Cant (Alt. Dublin back-slang for the number 1))

*''I 'n' I'' is an expression to totalize the concept of oneness. 'I and I' as being the oneness of two persons. So God is within all of us and we're one people in fact. I and I means that God is within all men. The bond of Ras Tafari is the bond of God, of man." The term is often used in place of "you and I" or "we" among Rastafari, implying that both persons are united under the love of Jah. Also in the Twi language (in which patois uses a lot of Twi loan words) of Ghana, Me ne me is also said, which literally translate to "I and I". - E. E. Cashmore, Rastafarian scholar

There's a dictionary of Cant words in a book called Traveler Ways & Traveler Words, which is 'a product of the TCHC - Travellers Cultural Heritage Centre - which is based in Pavee Point. The centre was set up in 1990 by the DTEDG - Dublin Travellers Education & Development Group.' That is the source I have used for the aforementioned ''Wadn't'' - What's Not, ''Me'' - My, '''til'' - Until, '''Pose'' - Supposed, ''Communi'y'' - Community. ''Wan'', which I have used in the verse above, is the Cant word for One, and it is listed in the dictionary of Traveler Ways & Traveler Words as such, but it is also a word which could be described as Dublin back-slang.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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There's unlikely to be one precise definition as to what constitutes Shelta so no-one can claim to be completely correct..
The wonders of Buerla Reagaird, Kale, Michif and Shelta - The craftsmen's secret speech

Beurla Reagaird

Beurla Reagaird is spoken in the Northern Scottish Highlands, and is totally different to the Romany Cant used in the southern half of Scotland. Beurla Reagaird is only spoken within Gaelic-speaking areas, or rather Gaelic-speaking groups, and those who spoke the lingo were poets, horse-traders, craftsmen and news-bringers. Dhailean, God, is the Beurla Reagaird equivelent of the Irish Shelta word, Dhalun. The Irish Gaelic word Óglach, Youth, is related to the Beurla Reagaird word for Man, Glomach. Linguistic evidence which points to a common origin.

One of Shakespeare's characters, Caliban, comes from the Romany Cant word for Dark. When Anti-Gypsy Laws were first imposed by the British, beginning in 1541, in order to hide their identities, Roma Gypsy families such as the Faws, began to adopt Gaelic names such as McPhees, although there is also an abundance of evidence which shows that there was a lot of intermarriage between the Scottish Gaelic Travelers and the Roma, and for more than 300 years afterwards, the Romany lived like semi-outlaws. In 1547 another Law was introduced which legislated for all ''able-bodied vagabond’s to be branded with a V and made slaves for two years''. In 1665 further legislation was introduced, to transport all ''idle beggars, Gypsies and criminals to Jamaica'', so by the time James Macpherson was hanged in 1700, to what extent Shakespeares Caliban had become an outlaw, a rebel, a Gypsy or a Scottish Traveler Chieftan is not quite clear.

As travelling merchants An Ceardannan, the word originally meant craftsmen, played a vital role in Gaelic society. They were part of, but clearly separate from the settled population. Their distinctness is affirmed by Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, for example, which issued exactions for 'bards, sorners (beggars), and ithir siclike rinners aboot'. We hear of them travelling in bands and quartering themselves on reluctant hosts-eating them out of house and home and engaging in debates of wit and contests of verse, 'till vanquished, or harried, they move on.

In Gaelic one grade of poet was designated Bleidire, a word which includes the sense of 'wheedler, flatterer' within its wider meaning. In some Gaelic dialects the plural Na Bleidirean, was used to describe travelling bards of this kind, and there can be no doubt that this kind of Traveler culture has fed down into the culture of the Gaelic Travelling people today. Their secret language, the Buerla Reagaird, relates in various ways to that bardic tradition, but their use of it became increasingly practical. It enabled Travelers for instance maybe, to keep a crofter in ignorance as they discussed the good and bad points of a horse. But, however it is used, the Beurla Reagaird retains a root in the medieval Gaelic literary tradition. Ward is a common Gaelic name that once meant The Son Of The Bard. Ward is also a very common Traveler name.

Shelta

Shelta is a language spoken by Irish Travelers, particularly in Ireland and the United Kingdom. It is widely known as the Cant, to its native speakers in Ireland as De Gammon, and to the linguistic community as Shelta. It was often used as a cryptolect to exclude outsiders from comprehending conversations between Travellers, although this aspect is frequently over-emphasised. The exact number of native speakers is hard to determine due to sociolinguistic issues, but Ethnologue puts the number of speakers at 30,000 in the UK, 6,000 in Ireland, and 50,000 in the US. The figure for at least the UK is dated to 1990; it is not clear if the other figures are from the same source.

Linguistically Shelta is today seen as a mixed language that stems from a community of travelling people in Ireland that was originally predominantly Irish-speaking. The community later went through a period of widespread bilingualism that resulted in a language based heavily on Hiberno-English with heavy influences from Irish. As different varieties of Shelta display different degrees of Anglicisation, it is hard to determine the extent of the Irish substratum. The Oxford Companion to the English Language puts it at 2,000–3,000 words.

Names and etymology

The language is known by various names. People outside the Traveller community often refer to it as Cant, the etymology of which is a matter of debate. Speakers of the language refer to it as Cant, Gammon or Tarri. Amongst linguists, the name Shelta is the most commonly used term.

Variants of the above names and additional names include Bog Latin, Caintíotar, Gammon, Sheldru, Shelter, Shelteroch, the Ould Thing, Tinker's Cant.

Etymology

The word Shelta appears in print for the first time in 1882 in the book The Gypsies by the "gypsiologist" Charles Leland, who claimed to have discovered it as the "fifth Celtic tongue". The etymology of the word has long been a matter of debate: Modern Celticists are convinced that Irish siúl, "to walk", is at the root, either via a term such as siúltóir, "a walker", siúladh, or currently, an lucht siúlta, "the walking people", the traditional Irish term for Travelers. The Dictionary of Hiberno-English cites it as possibly a corruption of the word "Celt".

Origins and history

Linguists have been documenting Shelta since at least the 1870s. The first works were published in 1880 and 1882 by Charles Leland.Celtic language expert Kuno Meyer and Romani expert John Sampson both assert that Shelta existed as far back as the 13th century.

In the earliest but undocumented period linguists surmise that the Traveler community was Irish-speaking until a period of widespread bilingualism in Irish and Hiberno-English (or Scots in Scotland) set in, leading to creolisation (possibly with a trilingual stage). The resulting language is referred to as Old Shelta and it is suspected that this stage of the language displayed distinctive features, such as non-English syntactic and morphological features, no longer found in Shelta.

Within the diaspora, various sub-branches of Shelta exist. English Shelta is increasingly undergoing anglicisation, while American Irish-Traveler's Cant, originally also synonymous with Shelta, has by now been almost fully Anglicised. - Shelta


The Michif Language – Prairie French, Cant or Shelta?

The Cryptolectal Speech of the American Roads: Traveler Cant and American Angloromani - Ian Hancok

There exist a number of 'languages of the roads', which have received passing mention in the literature over the years, but which until comparatively recently have not been the subject of scientific investigation. All of the documentation of these originates from, and describes, the situation in the British Isles. Hardly acknowledged at all is the fact that these modes of speech exist in anglophone territories overseas, such as Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada and the United States. There are between 50,000 and 100,000 people here in the United States who define themselves as Travelers, and who speak among themselves codes belonging to the type of language dealt with here. They consist of a number of distinct groups, the principle three being Irish Travelers, the Scottish Travelers and the Romanichals. American Travelers' Cant is now largely Anglicized. Words from Romany, originally an Indian dialect, Shelta, the Cant of the Irish Travelers, Yiddish, back slang, rhyming slang and other non-standard English are interspersed with words of Italian origin.’ - Shelta - Traveler Cant

[video]https://youtu.be/5cjaEjw6x-U[/video]Louis Riel Institute: Michif Language Examples "Oh Where oh where has my little dog gone (song)"

'The first language is a dialect of Prairie French; the second is a distinct language like no other in the world.'

There's only 120 known Galatian words, and in the way one word such as Bardoi connects the Galatians to the Irish, the Scottish, the Manx and the Welsh, Bardoi, one word Berro, links the west Canadian Jicarilla Apache of the 16th and 17th centuries with the modern day southern Apache of the US, and their very first encounters with Europeans. Again, the Galatian, Tectosages is Teacht in modern Irish, from old Irish Techt. We had our own words for the sages, so perhaps we have always 'talked the two talks', although there's more than a dozen languages in the Book of the Dean of Lismore. One phrase, Caimmer hah shui ndiuth?, 'How are you?', connects us to our history with the Metís forever. The Jicarilla and the Kiowa also migrated from the areas where Bungee and Michif were spoken.

The Metis are well known as speakers of many languages. In the past many Metis spoke up to five or six languages, including Michif, French, English, Cree, Ojibway and Bungee.

Historically, the Metis were the lifeblood of the west. Their ability to communicate in so many languages was incredibly useful in the many occupations of the Metis. The Metis were the voyageurs, the buffalo hunters, boatmen, fisherman, traders, small business owners, lumbermen, farmers, cattlemen and of course, highly regarded interpreters. To this day many Metis people still speak or understand multiple languages.

The Michif Language

"The Métis also have a long tradition of adapting aspects of First Nations and European culture to better suit their needs. Language is no exception. The languages most widely used by the Prairie Métis people were Michif-French, Michif-Cree and Bungee. The first language is a dialect of Prairie French; the second is a distinct language like no other in the world. All the nouns and associated grammar are Plains Cree. These are both very unique adaptations of the Metis people. Bungee or Bungi (see M Stobie, 1968; and E. Blain. 1989, 1994), a now extinct language, consisted of Gaelic and Cree mixed with French and Saulteaux."

Deconstructing Métis Historiography: Giving Voice to the Métis People, L. Dorion, D. R. Préfontaine, in Metis Legacy, Pemmican Publications, 2001

The Michif language which was once common in Metis Communities and is now considered an endangered language as there are fewer that 1000 people who speak it.

Today the Michif language is making a comeback due to the cultural resurgence of the Metis people. Speaking Michif, and Speaking Michif-French, both developed by the Louis Riel Institute provides teachers, interested individuals and families with beginner lessons.

Leigheas air Barrain

This cure, collected from Effie Currie of Frenchvale, Cape Breton County, describes a homemade healing bandage. Fungi found around old stumps were collected, taken home and fashioned into a bandage. As with many remedies of the time, reciting prayers was part of the process.

Leigheas air Barrain

Am boireannach a bha seo, dh’fhaighnich i dé an t-ainm a bh’ air a nighinn. Thug mi dhi an t-ainm, Màiri Ann. Agus bhiodh ‘ad a’ faighinn…chan urra’ mise ‘cantainn dé an t-ainm a bh’ air, chan e snodhach a bh’ ann, cha chreid mi… ach bidh e `fas aig bàrr nan stumpaichean - seann stumpa. Tha e coltach ri dorais bheaga. Agus bha i ga cruinneachadh sin, agus bha i `dol dhachaidh, `s bha i `ga thoirt leath’ na gheobheadh i `seo agus bha i `gabhail ùrnaigh. Chan eil fhios agamsa dé `n ùrnaigh a bha i `gabhail. Agus bha i `cur rud dhe seo ann am poca beag, agus bha i `ga fhuaghal. `S bha i `cur sreang às, bheireadh i dhomh na thuigeadh i fhéin `s chuir a màthair dh’ionnsaigh na h-ighinn e. O, an ceann latha bhiodh an nighean na b’ fheàrr agus gabhaidh `ad - na barrain - eagal, théid eagal a chur orra, neo an leagadh -gu faigheadh iad droch leagadh. Agus sin mar a chuala mise sgeul mu na barrain. - Colaisde na Gàidhlig

It is more than possible that more words will one day be discovered, within the native American dialects which have been recorded, which originated from the knowledge shared between the native Americans and the Gaels, in the very earliest encounters. There's only a couple of letters between the Kiowa word for Berro, and the Canadian Scottish Gaelic Barrain for example.

[video]https://youtu.be/o2FsElCXlHI[/video]Michif: A Mixed Language

Comment 1

'There is a book called The Summer Walkers written by a man called Timothy Neat about Gaelic Travelers, and it contains a dictionary of Shelta words. If they had a word for Chi Mi, it would be Michi. The idea being that they switched the words around to hide the meaning. It's important to understand where the Gaelic speakers were coming from, before they arrived at the Red River, and how names like Gilbride, Henderson, MacKenzie, MacNeill and Big Bear McLean arrived in America. The same names pop up in the Black Choctaw territory - Black Choctaws - African-Native American Genealogy.'

'McDonald, McGuire, Murphy, McNeill, McKinney, McGilbry, McCurtain'

Most of the Clan names are from Glencoe, which was the scene of a famous incident called Mort Gleann Comhan, which means the Massacre of Glencoe, which took place in February 1692. They are all Gaelic Clan names, and they were the first slaves who arrived in America.'

Comment 2

Chi is a Scottish Gaelic word, which means to 'see' - Chi Mi - I See
Scottish Gaelic: Ciamar a tha thu - How are you?
Irish Gaelic: Cé mar atá thú - How are you?
Michi: Caimmer hah shui ndiuth - How do you do?
Boon Matayn: Caimmer hah shui ndiuth? - Good Morning - How are you?
Boon Matayn is roughly how a Scottish Gaelic speaker would sound saying, Barr an Maidin.

[video]https://youtu.be/s5mj5TrNgdk[/video]Métis Languages - Michi

Canadian Gaelic-Michi

Hello - Taanishi
Good Morning - Boon Matayn
Good Afternoon - Bonn Apray Mijii
Good Evening - Boon Swayr
Goodbye - Miina Kawapamitin
How are you? - Caimmer hah shui ndiuth?

Notes - Timothy Neat, The Summer Walkers; James Mooney, The Ghost Dances; Pavee Point Publications, Traveler Ways & Traveler Words; Ian Hancock, The Cryptolectal Speech of the American Roads: Traveler Cant and American Angloromani
 
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Antóin Mac Comháin

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Diaspora Na Gael - The Exodus of the Gael

Cha b'e 'n clò ciar nach b' fhiach 'f hùcadh, mar a míníonn an seanfhocail mar gheall ar Gníomh Parlaiminte 1746 san Alban. Ciallaíonn an focail 'Diaspora' cine airithe a bheith scaipthe ar fud an domhain. Focail Greigise is ea e a husaideadh le scaipeadh na nGiúdach a mhíníu nuair a dibríodh as a dtír féin iad in aimsir na Romans. Chuaigh siad ar an gcéad dul síos go dtí na tíortha ar an Meanmhair, deisceart na hEorpa ach go hairaithe. Ansin chuaigh siad o thuaidh th'eis dóibh gearleannúint is díbirt a fhuallaingt i dtíortha fe leith. Churaidh as a dtir féin iad de bharr cogaíocht le na gcomharsana. Tá a lan i gcoíteann idir na nGaeil is na nGiúdach, agus caitheadh amach as a dtír féin an bheirt acu de dheasca an impiriúlachas, is tá na nGaeil is na nGiúdach scaipthe anois ar fud an domhan mhóir.

What is perhaps less well known than other aspects of Irish and Scottish history, are the large numbers of our people that were rounded up and transported to the colonies to be sold into slavery.

Political prisoners were routinely sold into slavery, and The Act of Proscription (1746), which was passed after the Battle of Culloden stated that anyone wearing tartan or Highland dress was subject to transportation. Conditions on the ships were appalling, and many would not survive the long, grueling sea crossing and the cruel treatment meted out.

As early as the 1600’s, ships from Leith and Port Glasgow in Scotland sailed off to the colonies laden with Gaelic people that had been rounded up to be sold at the block, sometimes to line the pockets of their compatriots. The numbers taken as slaves must have been huge, as according to the Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, America and West Indies of 1701, we read that there was an estimated 25,000 slaves in Barbados alone, of whom 21,700 were believed to be white. The fair-skinned slaves in this area were known as Redlegs or Redshanks by the locals, because of their sunburned flesh. It was upon the sweat and tears of these unfortunate people that the British economy was driven forward and thrived.

Descendants of the Gaels forced into slavery are now beginning to realize that it a part of our history that has been quietly swept under the carpet, and are understandably feeling very angry. Pressure groups are looking for an official apology, and there is even a Scottish Slave Facebook page that is an “open group to all who believe they are descendants of the Scottish slaves, and all who support the recognition that this happened and demand an apology from the government”.
 
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ergo2

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British Travellers are ethnically distinct from Irish Travellers.
Many UK travellers are Irish. They tend to accompany their Irish based cousins on their jaunts around Ireland to beaches, pilgrimages etc.
 

Dearghoul

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Diaspora Na Gael - The Exodus of the Gael

Cha b'e 'n clò ciar nach b' fhiach 'f hùcadh, mar a míníonn an seanfhocail mar gheall ar Gníomh Parlaiminte 1746 san Alban. Ciallaíonn an focail 'Diaspora' cine airithe a bheith scaipthe ar fud an domhain. Focail Greigise is ea e a husaideadh le scaipeadh na nGiúdach a mhíníu nuair a dibríodh as a dtír féin iad in aimsir na Romans. Chuaigh siad ar an gcéad dul síos go dtí na tíortha ar an Meanmhair, deisceart na hEorpa ach go hairaithe. Ansin chuaigh siad o thuaidh th'eis dóibh gearleannúint is díbirt a fhuallaingt i dtíortha fe leith. Churaidh as a dtir féin iad de bharr cogaíocht le na gcomharsana. Tá a lan i gcoíteann idir na nGaeil is na nGiúdach, agus caitheadh amach as a dtír féin an bheirt acu de dheasca an impiriúlachas, is tá na nGaeil is na nGiúdach scaipthe anois ar fud an domhan mhóir.

What is perhaps less well known than other aspects of Irish and Scottish history, are the large numbers of our people that were rounded up and transported to the colonies to be sold into slavery.

Political prisoners were routinely sold into slavery, and The Act of Proscription (1746), which was passed after the Battle of Culloden stated that anyone wearing tartan or Highland dress was subject to transportation. Conditions on the ships were appalling, and many would not survive the long, grueling sea crossing and the cruel treatment meted out.

As early as the 1600’s, ships from Leith and Port Glasgow in Scotland sailed off to the colonies laden with Gaelic people that had been rounded up to be sold at the block, sometimes to line the pockets of their compatriots. The numbers taken as slaves must have been huge, as according to the Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, America and West Indies of 1701, we read that there was an estimated 25,000 slaves in Barbados alone, of whom 21,700 were believed to be white. The fair-skinned slaves in this area were known as Redlegs or Redshanks by the locals, because of their sunburned flesh. It was upon the sweat and tears of these unfortunate people that the British economy was driven forward and thrived.

Descendants of the Gaels forced into slavery are now beginning to realize that it a part of our history that has been quietly swept under the carpet, and are understandably feeling very angry. Pressure groups are looking for an official apology, and there is even a Scottish Slave Facebook page that is an “open group to all who believe they are descendants of the Scottish slaves, and all who support the recognition that this happened and demand an apology from the government”.
It was indentured service rather than slavery.

There is a vast difference.

One of the three tribes of what we call eskimos is known as the Deena, (the people) the Cree people as well, originally. Don't try to tell us they came up with that one because of contact with Gaelic speaking settlers.
 
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Pyewacket

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Diaspora Na Gael - The Exodus of the Gael

Cha b'e 'n clò ciar nach b' fhiach 'f hùcadh, mar a míníonn an seanfhocail mar gheall ar Gníomh Parlaiminte 1746 san Alban. Ciallaíonn an focail 'Diaspora' cine airithe a bheith scaipthe ar fud an domhain. Focail Greigise is ea e a husaideadh le scaipeadh na nGiúdach a mhíníu nuair a dibríodh as a dtír féin iad in aimsir na Romans. Chuaigh siad ar an gcéad dul síos go dtí na tíortha ar an Meanmhair, deisceart na hEorpa ach go hairaithe. Ansin chuaigh siad o thuaidh th'eis dóibh gearleannúint is díbirt a fhuallaingt i dtíortha fe leith. Churaidh as a dtir féin iad de bharr cogaíocht le na gcomharsana. Tá a lan i gcoíteann idir na nGaeil is na nGiúdach, agus caitheadh amach as a dtír féin an bheirt acu de dheasca an impiriúlachas, is tá na nGaeil is na nGiúdach scaipthe anois ar fud an domhan mhóir.

What is perhaps less well known than other aspects of Irish and Scottish history, are the large numbers of our people that were rounded up and transported to the colonies to be sold into slavery.

Political prisoners were routinely sold into slavery, and The Act of Proscription (1746), which was passed after the Battle of Culloden stated that anyone wearing tartan or Highland dress was subject to transportation. Conditions on the ships were appalling, and many would not survive the long, grueling sea crossing and the cruel treatment meted out.

As early as the 1600’s, ships from Leith and Port Glasgow in Scotland sailed off to the colonies laden with Gaelic people that had been rounded up to be sold at the block, sometimes to line the pockets of their compatriots. The numbers taken as slaves must have been huge, as according to the Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, America and West Indies of 1701, we read that there was an estimated 25,000 slaves in Barbados alone, of whom 21,700 were believed to be white. The fair-skinned slaves in this area were known as Redlegs or Redshanks by the locals, because of their sunburned flesh. It was upon the sweat and tears of these unfortunate people that the British economy was driven forward and thrived.

Descendants of the Gaels forced into slavery are now beginning to realize that it a part of our history that has been quietly swept under the carpet, and are understandably feeling very angry. Pressure groups are looking for an official apology, and there is even a Scottish Slave Facebook page that is an “open group to all who believe they are descendants of the Scottish slaves, and all who support the recognition that this happened and demand an apology from the government”.
Christ almighty. .Were things not bad enough that they we now have to pretend we were African slaves?

The ****ing cheek of us.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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They are dead right, Ireland's most oppressed people, structural discrimination and refusal to acknowledge the other is much in evidence. The racist comments above which are tolerated by the mods are beneath contempt
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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''Some of the prisoners were publicly sold as loot, and a thousand were sent to Caesar, who had lately returned from the Cantabrians, others died of various diseases.'' - Strabo: Geography, c. 22 CE (Roman) XVI.iv.4-17; XVII.i.53-54, ii.1-3, iii.1-11.

'Gaelic-speaking people from the Cantabrian Mountains, the Veneti, the Lusitanians, the Bretons or the Caledonians, sold into slavery in Kutha, in ancient Iraq, and subsequently transported to a Roman colony in Judea or Israel.'

African American Black Choctaw Genealogical table: Black Choctaws

Ancient chronicles long mentioned that people, as well as precious objects, were a target of the Viking raids that began in 793 A.D. at the Scottish monastery of Lindisfarne. The Annals of Ulster record a great booty of women taken in a raid near Dublin in 821 A.D., while the same account contends that 3,000 people were captured in a single attack a century later.

Ibn Hawqal, an Arab geographer, described a Viking slave trade in 977 A.D. that extended across the Mediterranean from Spain to Egypt. Others recorded that slaves from northern Europe were funneled from Scandinavia through Russia to Byzantium and Baghdad.

For example, at a Swedish site called Sanda, researchers in the 1990s found a great hall surrounded by small houses. Some Swedish archaeologists now believe this could have been a Viking plantation with slaves as the labor force.

The Sami

We first hear of them in the year 98 AD from the Roman historian Tacitus in his book Germania. At that time, they were called Fenni. Tacitus described them as a primitive hunting tribe who roamed the forests near Germany. In the second century A.D, Ptolemy of Alexandria spoke of a tribe in Scandinavia called the Phinnoi. And then in 555 AD the Greek historian Procopius in describing a war between the Romans and the Goths referred to a people called the Skridfinns who inhabited Scandinavia. And then once again in 750 AD Paulus Diaconus mentions a people called the Skridfinns who kept animals resembling deer. In the 9th and 10th centuries the Swedish Vikings are thought to have introduced the name Lapp.This name then spread throughout Scandinavia, to the Finns, the Russians and later to the Germans, Hungarians, Estonians and other groups. Today, the Sami prefer the name Sami, and their land is called Sapmi.

'The Marquis de la Roche took his pick from the Breton Jails to man successive expeditions to the New World' - White Cargo

document.png

Failed Colonies: Sable Island 1598

The people targeted for transportation in the 16th, 17th and 18th century, to the Sable Islands and the Caribbean, are descended from the people who resisted Roman occupation 17-1800 years beforehand.
''Genetic and linguistic data of 1995 seemed to show that the Finns arrived in Sámi territory a mere 2,000 to 4,000 years ago, while at the same time adopting the Sámi way of speaking.''

They are the ''Fair People'', known as the Tylwyth Teg in Welsh, who fled from the Romans north wards.

If a DNA test was done on the slaves listed in the African American Black Choctaw Genealogical table: Black Choctaws, it would match the DNA of the ''Sami'' who arrived in Scandinavia 2,000-4,000 years ago.
'McDonald, McGuire, Murphy, McNeill, McKinney, McGilbry, McCurtain'
Christ almighty. .Were things not bad enough that they we now have to pretend we were African slaves?

The ****ing cheek of us.
Pemequid and Wabanakai Indians were the very first slaves to be transported to England, and the honour of being the first slaves transported the other way were Breton speakers in the 1590s, who were genetically and linguisitically linked to the Sami, Skridfinns, Veneti, Lusitanians and Caledonians, described above who were sold into slavery in places such as Kutha. Who needs to pretend?

The wars of the 1570s and 1580s marked a watershed in Ireland. The southern Geraldine axis of power was annihilated, and Munster was "planted" with English colonists given land confiscated from those who fought for their country. After a survey begun in 1584 by Sir Valentine Browne, Surveyor General of Ireland, the thousands of English soldiers and administrators who had been imported to suppress the rebellion were given land in the Munster Plantation of Desmond's confiscated estates. After three years of scorched earth warfare by the English, Munster was racked by famine. In April 1582, the provost marshal of Munster, Sir Warham St Leger, estimated that 30,000 people had died of hunger in the previous six months. Plague broke out in Cork city, to where the country people had fled to avoid the fighting. People continued to die of starvation and plague long after the war had ended, and it is estimated that by 1589 one-third of the province's population had died.

'In those late wars in Munster; for notwithstanding that the same was a most rich and plentiful country, full of corn and cattle, that you would have thought they could have been able to stand long, yet ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the wood and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked Anatomies of death, they spoke like ghosts crying out of their graves; they did eat of the carrions, happy where they could find them, yea, and one another soon after, in so much as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves; and if they found a plot of water-cresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able long to continue therewithal; that in a short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man or beast.' - View of the Present State of Ireland, written by English poet Edmund Spenser

What have the Desmond Rebellions in Munster, the Plymouth Company, the Virginia Colony, John Popham, Humphrey Gilbert and Bartholomew Gilbert got in common?

The African American Black Choctaw Genealogical table has it's fair share of Munster surnames, such as Murphy and MacCurtain emboldened above, similar in a quantifiable way to the Glencoe and English surnames.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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It was indentured service rather than slavery.

There is a vast difference.
If it was illegal for non-indentured servants to leave the early colonies in the north, one can only imagine what an indentured servants contract agreed with a man like John Popham looked like. His initial idea was to woo convicts and to drown them at sea, until he had the brain-wave to use them as free labour. The Blue-print for the Virginia colony came from Munster. On the one hand a lot of people who signed and agreed contracts as servants were never enslaved by any stretch of the imagination, but on the other end of that scale 100's of thousands of people were enslaved. Although social conditions in England in the 1550's and the 1560's was the driving factor in that era of the slave trade and tens of thousands of English people were enslaved, it doesn't alter the fact that the Brehon and Irish speaking slaves were genetically and linguistically linked to the aforementioned Sami, Skridfinns, Veneti, Lusitanians and Caledonian who had been enslaved by the Vikings and the Romans 2,000 years beforehand. An estimated 2/3rds of the 3-400,000 indentured servants who traveled between 1620 and 1770 were 'free-willers', but that doesn't account for those were sent to the Caribbean on ships such as the Adventurer to which the opening phrase of the first paragraph quoted refers, and a lot of them were enslaved anyhoo. What was true for the red river wasn't true for St Louise.

One of the three tribes of what we call eskimos is known as the Deena, (the people) the Cree people as well, originally. Don't try to tell us they came up with that one because of contact with Gaelic speaking settlers.
A discovery in Greenland in 1989 made by scientists drilling into the Ice found that there had been 24 major climate shifts, as opposed to what they had previously believed. Perhaps the Siberians hopped around the north at a much earlier period, got trapped, and became the Eskimos, thus Daoine?

Description: This document discusses Bungee, an English dialect with Scots-Gaelic and Cree, that was spoken by English Metis living in what is now present-day Western Canada. - The Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture

Cree language gets 21st-century reboot from First Nation Canadians

“Some of us no longer have grandparents – mosômak and kôhkomak – who can guide us in the process of learning language and stories. We need the stories and philosophy to drive and fuel our understanding of the language. It is by a collective effort that we can bring the power of the echo of the voices of the Old Ones, and the old stories, into the contemporary age,” he writes.

“All too often, people think that technology and television are negative factors leading to the decline of indigenous languages, including Cree. However, I would say the internet, including Facebook … can help with language retention. Social media played a key role in the writing of this book. Words were posted, and then people from all over Canada and the US contributed .”

There's an interesting tale about the revival of Cree using the Internet for positive change. Bungi and Michif are to Cree what Cant and Shelta are to Gaelic. It would be interesting to see if any Gaelic has found its way into the above dictionary.
 
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Antóin Mac Comháin

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There's far more to Cant (aka Shelta) than bad English. Some of the words have histories going back centuries.

http://www.politics.ie/forum/culture-community/194711-wonders-shelta.html
Giofan looks like Shelta although in the above context it should mean "capall" or "horse"....?

Anyway, it's not "bad Gaelic". For example, there was a deliberate tendency to take two syllable words and switch around the initial and middle consonant. For example, the word for road (tobar) comes from "bót[h]ar", the word for girl (lac(k)in) is formed similarly from "cailín".
Shelta is the sort of language that never had much constancy about it. It's always been evolving, always borrowing words from the dominant language and changing them around. So, it doesn't surprise me that few Travellers today speak the version that was documented 100-150 years ago.
There's unlikely to be one precise definition as to what constitutes Shelta so no-one can claim to be completely correct. It's a fine point I'm trying to make but to refer to Shelta words as "bad Irish" or "bad English" may give the impression that the users simply don't know the correct way to say them - in the same that some people might say "I seen" instead of "I saw".

Shelta users invariably did and do know how to use the word the correct way. The distortion is systematic and deliberate. That's the whole point of the language and you sound well-informed enough already to know the reasons for that.
Description: This document discusses Bungee, an English dialect with Scots-Gaelic and Cree, that was spoken by English Metis living in what is now present-day Western Canada. - The Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture
If the above description of Bungee/Bungi is accurate, ie.' an English dialect with Scots-Gaelic and Cree', and Michif is a Cree-dominant language with altered syllables described by the Louis Riel Institution in the following terms: 'The languages most widely used by the Prairie Métis people were Michif-French, Michif-Cree and Bungee. The first language is a dialect of Prairie French; the second is a distinct language like no other in the world..', it could very well be the case that Michif ultimately owes its origins to 'the Gaelic tradition', in which case the syllables are reversed, unlike in Bungee..

On another note..

Comedy about Native vs New Speakers of Scottish Gaelic
 
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