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'Slow' Art


statsman

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An interesting article, in Spanish unfortunately, on the 'slow art' movement in Barcelona. The main focus is around an exhibition of photographs of 'faces' found in the trunks of olive trees on the island of Mallorca. These trees are 2,000 years old that the faces are the work of time and the elements only. They are generally only visible as faces from a single angle and even the photographers struggle to find them a second time. The photographs themselves are the product of 10 years patient work by three men, Pere Ferrer, a historian, José Sedano, and a filmmaker called Daniel Ferrer.

The exhibition is hosted by the Fundación Sebta in Barcelona; the foundation's mission seems to be to move the art world away from the Damien Hirst style market-driven disposable 'art' that dominates the contemporary scene. Looks interesting.

La filosofía

 


ruserious

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Something tells me, this ain't natural...;)

 

MauriceColgan

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LINKS FAHREN

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Interesting. In the piece, one of the artists makes the point that the forms can appear and disappear with the slightest movement on the part of the viewer and
never be captured again.
Definitely not the basis for a tawdry, commodity-based art in a hyper-capitalist economy!

And I never knew that these trees in Mallorca were "over 2,000 years old and the harsh conditions in which they grow show themselves in the trunks which seem to twist back on themselves as if to express the very suffering of their existence!"

A far cry from Hirst's diamond skulls and sharks in formaldehyde.

Do ye think, though, that such "slow" movements are reactionary and yearn for an idyllic past that never was? That they seek a form of wizened innocence?

Or that they are also very political, and find a resonance more on the continent where opposition to the "Americanisation" of life finds a more ready response?
 

statsman

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Interesting. In the piece, one of the artists makes the point that the forms can appear and disappear with the slightest movement on the part of the viewer and
never be captured again.
Definitely not the basis for a tawdry, commodity-based art in a hyper-capitalist economy!

And I never knew that these trees in Mallorca were "over 2,000 years old and the harsh conditions in which they grow show themselves in the trunks which seem to twist back on themselves as if to express the very suffering of their existence!"

A far cry from Hirst's diamond skulls and sharks in formaldehyde.

Do ye think, though, that such "slow" movements are reactionary and yearn for an idyllic past that never was? That they seek a form of wizened innocence?

Or that they are also very political, and find a resonance more on the continent where opposition to the "Americanisation" of life finds a more ready response?
I think there is a strongly anti-Americanisation element. Which is not the same thing as an anti-American feeling, by any means. More broadly, its an anti-commercialisation-for-its-own-sake movement.

And thanks for moving the discussion back to a more serious plane.
 

LINKS FAHREN

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"Americanisation" as a synonym for capitalism, indeed, and not as a dislike for Americans.

I'm always struck both by the nostalgia and potential political implications of such movements, whether in terms of art or food. The central issue is time, which is a commodity like any other. Hence, the idea that allowing time "back in" to the process, whether it be making a nice meal or producing a work of art, is striking a blow against the ferocious pace of modern capitalist existence.

It's no coincidence that one of the reasons that right-wingers hate the unemployed is that they have too much time on their hands. What will they get up to with their unearned chronological abundance?? Shouldn't those without work be in the best position to avail of "slow" food, art, sex and urban design?

It doesn't happen that way, of course.

Hence, the "slow" movement is the response of, say, the small producer or the liberal civil servant, both opposed to the rapacity and speed of the modern globalised world.

The poor have too much time and the rich can't make more hours in the day. Those in the middle are the ones in a position to be inventive with their middling time allocation.
 

westernyelp

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Anything that can get rid of Hirst, Emin and the Turner prize brigade is fine by me.
 

statsman

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"Americanisation" as a synonym for capitalism, indeed, and not as a dislike for Americans.

I'm always struck both by the nostalgia and potential political implications of such movements, whether in terms of art or food. The central issue is time, which is a commodity like any other. Hence, the idea that allowing time "back in" to the process, whether it be making a nice meal or producing a work of art, is striking a blow against the ferocious pace of modern capitalist existence.

It's no coincidence that one of the reasons that right-wingers hate the unemployed is that they have too much time on their hands. What will they get up to with their unearned chronological abundance?? Shouldn't those without work be in the best position to avail of "slow" food, art, sex and urban design?

It doesn't happen that way, of course.

Hence, the "slow" movement is the response of, say, the small producer or the liberal civil servant, both opposed to the rapacity and speed of the modern globalised world.

The poor have too much time and the rich can't make more hours in the day. Those in the middle are the ones in a position to be inventive with their middling time allocation.
As a building labourer I was a prolific amateur artist.

Painting in oils every night including weekends. Artists make time!
Yes, time is, of course, the key issue. Part of the problem with much contemporary consumer art is that the artists have decided not to make time, but rather to make things quickly and to sell.

I'm not sure that wanting to turn the clock back in this instance is nostalgia so much as a demand that the job be done well.
 

McTell

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Couldn't you do this slow art thing a bit quicker with photoshop? Who would know that the faces were assembled and collaged by you?

Would that be known as "fast slow art"?
 

statsman

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Couldn't you do this slow art thing a bit quicker with photoshop? Who would know that the faces were assembled and collaged by you?

Would that be known as "fast slow art"?
Or cheating.

I'm not sure you're getting this. :)
 

McTell

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An' tell me now, would the fractals in them trees include the faces as well? Surely to god they would.

Shockin powerful things, fractals, so they are. Then again, it could all be a cod to get more tourists into Catalunya
 

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