Snide or Brutally Honest: Irish Ambassador to UK Calls Telegraph Column by Simon Heffer 'Snide'

YesSireeeBob

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Irish Ambassador criticises

The Irish Ambassador to the UK took to twitter over this opinion piece by Simon Heffer:

“Not impressed at snide comments of Simon Heffer @Telegraph.
I can assure him there is precious little support in Ireland for an EU exit.

Simon Heffer, there’s lots going for Irish economy other than 12.5 per cent tax.
Highly educated, hard-working population, location within EU.

Compare Ireland’s economic performance 1922-73 with 1973-2017.
Demonstrates the value of EU membership for a country like ours.
1973: GDP per capita 60 per cent of EU av. Today 2nd in EU.”

Seems Heffer hit a nerve there.

But is he right? Let's take a look at the points he's making:

1. EU is aiming to get rid of Ireland's 12.5% corporate tax.
2. This 12.5% tax is about the only thing keeping Ireland economically viable.
3. Ireland will therefore want to leave the EU.
4. Hard border will not revive terrorism - that's just scaremongering.


Point 1 is correct, the EU is trying to harmonise corporate tax across the EU.

Point 2, though is really where the nerve was hit.
The ambassador says we have highly educated, hard-working population, location within EU, but that's a very week argument - same could be said about most EU countries. And the 2nd in EU GDP argument - well isn't that just the multinationals?
Heffer is correct - without the multinationals we would be a basket case - around 200k jobs and hundreds of thousands of jobs indirectly - about 20% of jobs in the private sector.
The multinationals, according to tax lawyer Suzanne Kelly says that multinational companies in Ireland pay 80% of corporation tax, 50% of PAYE and VAT, and 92% of customs and excise.

Point 3: If Ireland were forced to charge an EU rate - and no sweetheart rates, many people in Ireland would start calling for and EU exit, and if the UK gets a good trade deal, many people would support this.
According to a Red C poll published by the Sunday Business Post, on the 29th of January, 70% were in favour of Ireland remaining in the EU and 28% believed Ireland should leave the EU if Brexit leads to a hard border.
So 28% if a hard border, would be much higher if the EU goes after the corporate tax rate.

Point 4: Heffer is correct again. There is no support for violence from communities in the north and border checks won't affect most. Most of the checks will be of a commercial nature and probably won't affect ordinary people.
In fact the border may present 'opportunities' for those around the border.

Good hard hitting piece from Heffer - we are too sensitive in this country.
 


Clanrickard

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Irish Ambassador criticises

The Irish Ambassador to the UK took to twitter over this opinion piece by Simon Heffer:




Seems Heffer hit a nerve there.

But is he right? Let's take a look at the points he's making:

1. EU is aiming to get rid of Ireland's 12.5% corporate tax.
2. This 12.5% tax is about the only thing keeping Ireland economically viable.
3. Ireland will therefore want to leave the EU.
4. Hard border will not revive terrorism - that's just scaremongering.


Point 1 is correct, the EU is trying to harmonise corporate tax across the EU.

Point 2, though is really where the nerve was hit.
The ambassador says we have highly educated, hard-working population, location within EU, but that's a very week argument - same could be said about most EU countries. And the 2nd in EU GDP argument - well isn't that just the multinationals?
Heffer is correct - without the multinationals we would be a basket case - around 200k jobs and hundreds of thousands of jobs indirectly - about 20% of jobs in the private sector.
The multinationals, according to tax lawyer Suzanne Kelly says that multinational companies in Ireland pay 80% of corporation tax, 50% of PAYE and VAT, and 92% of customs and excise.

Point 3: If Ireland were forced to charge an EU rate - and no sweetheart rates, many people in Ireland would start calling for and EU exit, and if the UK gets a good trade deal, many people would support this.

Point 4: Heffer is correct again. There is no support for violence from communities in the north and border checks won't affect most. Most of the checks will be of a commercial nature and probably won't affect ordinary people.
In fact the border may present 'opportunities' for those around the border.

Good hard hitting piece from Heffer - we are too sensitive in this country.
Heffer hates the EU like all good little Englanders. He wants us to leave to weaken the EU. He doesn't give a hoot about the Irish economy or jobs. Even if the CT rate goes up many comonaies will stay. It is not that easy up stumps and leave.
 

Vega1447

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Oct 18, 2007
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5,685


Irish Ambassador criticises

The Irish Ambassador to the UK took to twitter over this opinion piece by Simon Heffer:




Seems Heffer hit a nerve there.

But is he right? Let's take a look at the points he's making:

1. EU is aiming to get rid of Ireland's 12.5% corporate tax.
2. This 12.5% tax is about the only thing keeping Ireland economically viable.
3. Ireland will therefore want to leave the EU.
4. Hard border will not revive terrorism - that's just scaremongering.


Point 1 is correct, the EU is trying to harmonise corporate tax across the EU.

Point 2, though is really where the nerve was hit.
The ambassador says we have highly educated, hard-working population, location within EU, but that's a very week argument - same could be said about most EU countries. And the 2nd in EU GDP argument - well isn't that just the multinationals?
Heffer is correct - without the multinationals we would be a basket case - around 200k jobs and hundreds of thousands of jobs indirectly - about 20% of jobs in the private sector.
The multinationals, according to tax lawyer Suzanne Kelly says that multinational companies in Ireland pay 80% of corporation tax, 50% of PAYE and VAT, and 92% of customs and excise.

Point 3: If Ireland were forced to charge an EU rate - and no sweetheart rates, many people in Ireland would start calling for and EU exit, and if the UK gets a good trade deal, many people would support this.
According to a Red C poll published by the Sunday Business Post, on the 29th of January, 70% were in favour of Ireland remaining in the EU and 28% believed Ireland should leave the EU if Brexit leads to a hard border.

Point 4: Heffer is correct again. There is no support for violence from communities in the north and border checks won't affect most. Most of the checks will be of a commercial nature and probably won't affect ordinary people.
In fact the border may present 'opportunities' for those around the border.

Good hard hitting piece from Heffer - we are too sensitive in this country.
Yep, snide.

Brexiteers live in a fantasy world where "Eire" will follow them out of the EU and (Oh Happy Day) enter a "UK Free Trade Area". And of course France, Netherlands, Italy etc will leave the EU which will then break up.

Not gonna happen..
 

flavirostris

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He makes some good points. We are overly-reliant on the corporation tax thingy. Irish people are deluding themselves if they think these multinationals wouldn't go elsewhere if they were paying less tax.
 

silverharp

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I'd say the EU breaks apart before Ireland gets the itch to leave
 

flavirostris

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I'd say the EU breaks apart before Ireland gets the itch to leave
Exactly right I'd say. the fate of the EU will be decided by much bigger players than us. EU breakup is not a matter of 'if' but 'how long' I think.
 

PBP voter

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Heffer hates the EU like all good little Englanders. He wants us to leave to weaken the EU. He doesn't give a hoot about the Irish economy or jobs. Even if the CT rate goes up many comonaies will stay. It is not that easy up stumps and leave.
Even if he does hate Ireland the points he make have some merit.
 

Sister Mercedes

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I'd say the state of our health system, our dysfunctional housing market, our deteriorating universities, our high personal tax rates ... they're a bigger threat to MNC's leaving as they find it harder to convince key overseas staff to move here.
 

Man or Mouse

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Exactly right I'd say. the fate of the EU will be decided by much bigger players than us. EU breakup is not a matter of 'if' but 'how long' I think.
The Euro is flawed. On that, almost everyone agrees. Being so, it has to break up sooner or later and when that happens, what is the rationale for the EU? It would stand to reason also that those inside the Euro would fare worse than those outside when that comes to pass.

How many here favour political union, probably the only alternative to the above? With Brexit, that decision comes a lot closer I believe.
 

flavirostris

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The Euro is flawed. On that, almost everyone agrees. Being so, it has to break up sooner or later and when that happens, what is the rationale for the EU? It would stand to reason also that those inside the Euro would fare worse than those outside when that comes to pass.

How many here favour political union, probably the only alternative to the above? With Brexit, that decision comes a lot closer I believe.
I think if the Euro goes, that's it.. game over. The EU is finished. It's about time we started thinking about a post EU world and forging new alliances. I think the Irish political establishment and media have not woken up to this yet.
 

farnaby

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2. This 12.5% tax is about the only thing keeping Ireland economically viable.
...
Point 2, though is really where the nerve was hit.
The ambassador says we have highly educated, hard-working population, location within EU, but that's a very week argument - same could be said about most EU countries. And the 2nd in EU GDP argument - well isn't that just the multinationals?
Heffer is correct - without the multinationals we would be a basket case - around 200k jobs and hundreds of thousands of jobs indirectly - about 20% of jobs in the private sector.
The ambassador is right, the highlighted bit is snide and well worth challenging. Sure, MNCs are an integral part of the economy and tax is the number one reason for many of them being here in the first place. But the phrase suggests a house of cards held together by MNC sellotape which is hugely exaggerated and dangerous rhetoric (for us) in a paper popular among UK businesspeople.
 

Erudite Caveman

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If it is your first time reading a Heffer piece, you may not realise that the man is a compete ****. Every article is something like this aimed at something or someone that wouldn't fit in at an Edwardian tea party. Not worth giving this two seconds consideration.
 

Spanner Island

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The Telegraph is pretty much a snide piece of anti-Irish sh!te in its entirety...

It's why I read it... to keep tabs on what the obnoxious rule Britannia kind of Brits are consuming...

Wouldn't trust them as far as I could throw them.
 

Erudite Caveman

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I think if the Euro goes, that's it.. game over. The EU is finished. It's about time we started thinking about a post EU world and forging new alliances. I think the Irish political establishment and media have not woken up to this yet.
Meaningless twaddle, Flav. Guff.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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it is embarrassing how irish politicians are always kissing ass to the EU.

meanwhile, the country is being raped by : German vulture funds, uncontrolled immigration, Multinationals, high taxation, soft-on-crime legislation, a high-minimum wage matched to a high dole which keeps the irish on their sofa's while employers import workers from abroad , a mismatch of third-world men entering the country, our fish being nicked by Spanish trawlers, a housing crisis, etc etc....

Eirexit now. 1973 - 2017 RiP to the nightmare.
 
Last edited:

Erudite Caveman

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The Telegraph is pretty much a snide piece of anti-Irish sh!te in its entirety...

It's why I read it... to keep tabs on what the obnoxious rule Britannia kind of Brits are consuming...

Wouldn't trust them as far as I could throw them.
And they've really ramped it up since Brexfist. Now every columnist is a jingoistic loon, but Heffer's insufferable wallowing still stands apart.
 

Henry94.

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“Not impressed at snide comments of Simon Heffer @Telegraph.
I can assure him there is precious little support in Ireland for an EU exit.
Could he quantify that? I think he is wrong. There is a strong minority who think we should leave and in the years following Brexit it will be part of the political agenda.
 

Cdebru

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The Euro is flawed. On that, almost everyone agrees. Being so, it has to break up sooner or later and when that happens, what is the rationale for the EU? It would stand to reason also that those inside the Euro would fare worse than those outside when that comes to pass.

How many here favour political union, probably the only alternative to the above? With Brexit, that decision comes a lot closer I believe.
So the Euro is the only rationale for the EU ? Even though the Euro has only existed for 15 of the nearly 60 years of the EU/EEC and not all members of the EU are members of the Euro ?


The Euro failure won't break up the EU it would change it obviously but the other stuff the EU does won't be scrapped because it's single currency failed.
 

offalypat

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Heffer hates the EU like all good little Englanders. He wants us to leave to weaken the EU. He doesn't give a hoot about the Irish economy or jobs. Even if the CT rate goes up many comonaies will stay. It is not that easy up stumps and leave.
do you really think the eu give a hoot about irelands economy or jobs the eu own this country now along with the english the big earners in ireland are appointed quango stuffed jobs by ff/fg/lab who in turn dont give a shyte about irish people no more than the eu or england we are here to serve them and thats all.
 


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