So this is where the rip offs are??

aidanodr

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Hi Guys,

I was away for a weekend in Killarney / Tralee ( just past ). In TRALEE their is a pub proporting to be the Cheapest in Ireland - I have to say I agree, as you might. A picture tells a thousand stories:



I was talking last night to a bar worker. He said the cost of a barrel of Guinness to a pub is about €200, you get about 88 Pints from a barrel. €200 divided by 88 = €2.27 per pint - From there do the math. Back in Cork I am paying €4.20 for a guinness and €2.80 for a Ballygowan in my local - €7. In Tralee it was such a pleasure to pay over €5 for a Guinness and a Ballygowan and get back 50 cent change. Can any Traleeonians name the pub please?

==============================================================

Today I was listening to Joe Duffy - a chap came on called Nolan of Nolan's Supermarket in Clontarf. He said - in order to stay in business they have now bypassed the Irish Distributors. They are shipping their product in direct from the UK. He was startled and baffled at the cost differences for these products. The one I can remember - Canderel Sweetener OLD Price €2.80 or so, now 99 cent. Two bottles of washing up liquid for the price of one before. I am sure others who heard the show OR are from Clontarf may quote some more amazing price differences.

Nolan's Supermarket | Clontarf | Rate My Area

EDIT:
"One shopowner tells Joe that he is sourcing products from the UK, because he thinks Irish distributors are charging too much."

http://www.rte.ie/podcasts/2009/pc/p...s-liveline.mp3

1 minute 50 seconds in Richard Nolan of Nolans Supermarket, Clontarf speaks - have a listen. This is about 10mb in size. Comments on Distribution in Ireland please??

==============================================================

I brought up these two cases as they blatently show that the RIP OFFs are being maintained by vested interests STILL. In the case of the pubs could it be the various associations / Brewery Distributors? In the case of the supermarkets could it be the strangle hold of a proflicate middle man / Irish Wholesaler?

Even when selling Guinness at €3 their is still near on €1 margin per pint to that pub. It would seem in the case of my local the margin is near on €2 PER PINT. Their is one thing for sure - that Pub in Tralee IS NOT working at a loss even with those low prices.

I am sure we will have Tralee inhabitants giving varied opinions about this Pub - not for here now. Regardless of what the Pub is like ( very traditional ) THE POINT still remains the LOWER DRINK COSTS in action AND Guinness is Guinness ... the pint was perfectly fine!

Aidan
 
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locke

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As you're in Cork, you can get a pint of Beamish for €3 in Callanan's (Murphy's is cheap too, but they don't sell Guinness).

A lot of this comes down to the insane level of indebtedness that the country took on over recent years. Publicans were paying so much for their pubs that they had to create huge margins to pay off the debt. At the same time, old-fashioned pubs that had been in the same hands for a long time (like Callanan's, but I'm sure there are some the length and breadth of the country), which didn't have all that associated debt were able to keep their prices down.

There have been a couple of FT articles on related themes in the UK lately if you're interested.

FT.com / UK - Buy-out groups' pubs foray attacked
FT.com / Companies / UK companies - Pints and prices for tough times
 

Twin Towers

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There is a bar on Stephen St off Georges St in Dublin that has been selling all pints for €2/3 for the last while. Hideous place, full of alcoholics and the newly distressed but can't argue on price and nothing wrong with the drink either.
 

TradCat

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locke

You are dead right. In the end the pub trade was a victim of the property boom. The only way to restore the pub to the centre of Irish life (if that is desirable) would be to deregulate. allow anyone with a suitable premises to open a pub. Soon the kind of small locals we all loved would be springing up all over selling pints at reasonable prices.
 

aidanodr

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Hi Guys,

I know you werent necessarily eluding to this Twin Towers, but in conversation at my local last night ( which is an old pub too ) a point constantly brought up was stuff like "Ah shur, if pubs bring their prices down this much all we'll have is the dregs of society and winno's in the door" - another guy says "Yeah but do you want to be hit in the head by a flying bottle for your cheaper prices" - and this from the punters!

Whats all this about? Snobbishness? So if pubs get cheaper they are going to be stuffed full of alcoholics and wino's? Seems like the same old thing WHICH WAS THE CASE toward Lidl and Aldi - but now adays their car parks are full of Beemers and 4 x 4's.

Something in the Irish psyche - Oh if we pay less it must be bad. Have to be seen paying handsomely ... rubbish and foolish I think, and maybe the reason we ended up where we are now. A fool and his/her money are soon parted!

Aidan
 

aidanodr

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I would also comment that if prices in the pubs were of the order as illustrated above AND if more stores across the country had the b*lls as did Nolans Supermarket - then I think we would be on the right road toward a shorter recession. Reasonable prices again, affordable at a reasonable wage. If costs were again reasonable and seen to be going that way country wide - wage cuts would be more palitable PLUS the money being handed to the UK Gov up north by Irish shoppers would stay here in the Republic. Are these reasonable points that I am making guys??

Aidan
 

Twin Towers

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Hi Guys,

I know you werent necessarily eluding to this Twin Towers, but in conversation at my local last night ( which is an old pub too ) a point constantly brought up was stuff like "Ah shur, if pubs bring their prices down this much all we'll have is the dregs of society and winno's in the door" - another guy says "Yeah but do you want to be hit in the head by a flying bottle for your cheaper prices" - and this from the punters!
I know. I was just walking past about 11am and couldnt resist the novelty of a €2 pint of Guinness and left pretty sharpish. It looks like a cheap caff but it was previously a proper pub and still retains the license, clientele just what you expect to be drinking pints that time of day.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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If Im not mistaken, Dublin has 33% of the Irish population yet only 9% of all pubs in Ireland.

Government regulations work a miracle for publicans.
Yes and why wouldn't it be the case, given that at least 40 FF TDs are publicans. :p
 

zeleneye

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There is a bar on Stephen St off Georges St in Dublin that has been selling all pints for €2/3 for the last while. Hideous place, full of alcoholics and the newly distressed but can't argue on price and nothing wrong with the drink either.
I know the place. Its actually €3.50 for all pints. Not a bad price but...

What really gets me is the price of off-license sales in Dublin. I mean, I can somehow justify paying over €4 for a good pint of Guinness in a pub in central Dublin. However, I cannot understand why a mouldy old tin of beer should cost more than €2.
 

aidanodr

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I hope though ye all get my point. IT IS possible to sell stuff here in the Republic at reasonable prices. The area I have worked in for years is computers where retail margins are in around 15% if not less. It would seem our pubs and stores have been working on 100% or more AND I am told that with certain shorts in pubs one is looking at up to 500% margins based on the wholesale price of a bottle and the number of measures sold from it.

Another case of stranglehold on the Irish pub market is the resistance to Wetherspoons to come here. These guys announced the 99p pint recently in the UK.

Beer down to 99p a pint for first time since 1989

All this puts a huge question mark over how good business people actually ARE here in Ireland. NOT if you have to rely on anti competitive practices, price fixing, cartel behaviour to do business in the first place?

Aidan
 
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aidanodr

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Drug dealing is spiralling out of control.
:) - Oblivion, I spotted that too, also 'Vintners Federation of Ireland' AND 'Price include excise duty & VAT'

Be that as it may I still say IT IS possible to do business with prices like this. I have to say that prices in a country pub near cappoquin in Waterford were not too far off the above - Guinness €3.30. Still though €3 even for a pint sounds better and more rounded :)

Aidan
 

Bobert

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I was in the pub last night, paid €2.20 for a bottle of coke. ******************************g mad prices.
 

Disabled student

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Rip off

I am a deaf student in university as i need the supports to enable me to follow my lectures or tutorials so on.

I found out that Irish sign language interpreter was charging E200 minimum at least 2 hours or 1 hr for the same price. That's BIG RIP off for me personally.

I heard they normally charged their fee for E800 for 5 hours. That's crazy as it's lot worse OFF than beer rip off prices!!!!!!

I had to cut their services as they were eating into our support budget and opt for cheaper form of support - Notetaking -very good. Now it's more managable.
 

aidanodr

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Hi Disabled Student,

Yip - alot of other things far more important than beer prices. Why I started the thread was not to promote more beer drinking and cheaper prices - more to highlight the artificialness of alot of the prices here AND that it is possible to do business here in the Republic charging reasonable prices. BUT it appears most sectors STILL havent copped on yet AND do not want to either and will have to be dragged kicking and screaming.

My two examples above show the possible beginnings of businesses breaking out of cartels and forced uncompetitive practices spurred on by one motivation the real need to SURVIVE.

Aidan
 

CookieMonster

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Messers sell all their own brews for three euro a pint.

Or it may have been 4... I dunno. I had a few too many.
 

aidanodr

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With reference to one item I mentioned at the top of this thread:

"One shopowner tells Joe that he is sourcing products from the UK, because he thinks Irish distributors are charging too much."

http://www.rte.ie/podcasts/2009/pc/pod-v-120109-11m03s-liveline.mp3

1 minute 50 seconds in Richard Nolan of Nolans Supermarket, Clontarf speaks - have a listen. This is about 10mb in size. Comments on Distribution in Ireland please??

Aidan
 

Oppenheimer

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I hope though ye all get my point. IT IS possible to sell stuff here in the Republic at reasonable prices. The area I have worked in for years is computers where retail margins are in around 15% if not less. It would seem our pubs and stores have been working on 100% or more AND I am told that with certain shorts in pubs one is looking at up to 500% margins based on the wholesale price of a bottle and the number of measures sold from it.

Another case of stranglehold on the Irish pub market is the resistance to Wetherspoons to come here. These guys announced the 99p pint recently in the UK.

Beer down to 99p a pint for first time since 1989

All this puts a huge question mark over how good business people actually ARE here in Ireland. NOT if you have to rely on anti competitive practices, price fixing, cartel behaviour to do business in the first place?

Aidan
The point about the Nolan's supermarket is well made. I was discussing this over the weekend with someone in relation to buying on the internet. We noted that buying from, say Amazon.co.uk, and shipping to a Belfast address incurred no shipping costs, but to Dublin there was - WTF? If we are in a free trade Europe then nobody should be able to impose a cost on shipments, whether at source or point of destination. It seems there are crafty ba8tards ensconcing themselves in the chain to inflate prices for all. Time to rationalise the supply chains and freeze these fu ckers out.

Your second point requires collusion from the consumer and if we were happy to pay up with 100% margins in the prices then more fool us (and if the businessmen can make 100% sustained margins then they actually are clever), we as consumers also need to say NO and in a way that embarasses any seller of an overpriced product.
 


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