Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish

Should Irish be compulsory in schools?

  • Yes

    Votes: 459 54.9%
  • No

    Votes: 377 45.1%

  • Total voters
    836
  • Poll closed .


FutureTaoiseach

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It should remain compulsory but thought in the Gaelscoil-method, which is more effective. I hated Irish classes in secondary-school, not out of a dislike of the language, but rather because we had grammar rammed down our throats rather than spoken Irish.
 

Aindriu

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It should remain compulsory but thought in the Gaelscoil-method, which is more effective. I hated Irish classes in secondary-school, not out of a dislike of the language, but rather because we had grammar rammed down our throats rather than spoken Irish.
I agree. It should be taught as a living language not as a second language like French is for example
 

Gruffalo

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The bigger news in that article is that some Educational Psychologists are clearly making false claims about children having learning disabilities. If they are incapable of learning Irish then they should be incapable of learning another language.
 

DJP

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Most of the kids opting out of it are foreign nationals/the kids of foreign nationals who did not start their early or all of their primary/secondary education in Ireland.

And the question is not good. Virtually everyone is in favour of Irish being taught up until Junior Cert. The argument has been for Leaving Cert.
 
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not as a second language like French is for example
I disagree on that point. I should be taught as a second language like French, Germand etc. because for over 90% of students it is a second language. The problem I had with the teaching of Irish is that we were only introduced to the fact that the language has declensions in fifth year. When you're learning German or Latin, that is the first thing you're told about. The Irish syllabus seems stuck between an aspiration to have the language on an equal level with English and the reality that it is a "foreign" language for the vast majority who learn it.
 

W..R.H

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In its current form, Irish should not be made compulsory. The method of teaching Irish for the most part is not working.
 

KingKane

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I disagree on that point. I should be taught as a second language like French, Germand etc. because for over 90% of students it is a second language. The problem I had with the teaching of Irish is that we were only introduced to the fact that the language has declensions in fifth year. When you're learning German or Latin, that is the first thing you're told about. The Irish syllabus seems stuck between an aspiration to have the language on an equal level with English and the reality that it is a "foreign" language for the vast majority who learn it.
They should split it for Leaving Cert into two subjects, one with a focus on speaking and writing it. The other as a literature course. And get rid of the 10% marks bonus. We don't cover English grammar for the Leaving Cert it is assumed but we need to do it for Irish as we don't speak it every day.
 
D

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They should split it for Leaving Cert into two subjects, one with a focus on speaking and writing it. The other as a literature course. And get rid of the 10% marks bonus. We don't cover English grammar for the Leaving Cert it is assumed but we need to do it for Irish as we don't speak it every day.
And this will really tell us how many students - and parents - are really lovers of the language
 

macdarawhitfield

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Agree with King Kane and Baudrillard.As KK says Irish should be taught as two subjects-Language for non speakers and Literature for Gaeltacht kids.It's a nonsense learning the conditional 6 months before the exam.Wouldn't be allowed on the French or German course.So Baudrillard is spot on also,teach it as a foreign language in the Galltacht,which it is.Lots of foreign born kids learn it well,so its not like it's uniquely difficult.
 

seabhcan

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Irish will continue to die unless they reform the spelling and start teaching just one dialect.

Its insanity to try and teach kids 3 different dialects simultaneously + use an defective bastardised spelling system (due to the botched transliteration to Latin in the 1960's)

Make Irish easier to learn and kids will learn it. Take the example of Welsh - which is written phonetically - and people actually learn, and use it.
 

jcdf

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I do not speak Irish. I believe that the decision as to weather teaching it, should be compulsory or not, is better left to the individual schools than being appointed from high by government.

Some lay the blame on the way Irish is taught, and a report last week found that it was the least favourite subject among nine year olds.
This is pointless! How do you measure something like a nine year old favourite subject. Nine year olds are fickle and lack the necessary mental development do make such judgments.
 

Wednesday

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Take the example of Welsh - which is written phonetically - and people actually learn, and use it.
English is one of the least "phonetic" languages in the Indo-European group if not the world, and yet people manage to learn and use it. It also has any number of dialects, of course.

The problem isn't with the language itself. Just the way it's taught.
 

QuizMaster

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for 14 years of misery in Irish classes, I voted no.

Don't they know anything about child psychology? If they want to preserve the language they have to give it appeal.
Not sure how to do that.
 
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It should of course be compulsory. I'm not sentimental about these things, but if we are not to succumb entirely to being merely a wetter version of England, then the survival of the language is the main means to avoid it. I grew up in England and never had the chance to learn it as a child, I'd love to have. I am cackhandedly trying now though...
 

bm42

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Irish should be used as a medium for discussing and writing about relevant issues for students. If the students are engaged by the subject matter, the medium becomes second nature. Perhaps there should be a seperate optional class for the literature side, you could make it a choice between irish and english literature, but the current model of irrelevant material through a poorly understood medium has clearly failed.
 

rozeboosje

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Not only is Irish a dead language, it's a USELESS dead language.

Warming a corpse up to 37 degrees doesn't make it alive.
 

Dasayev

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Irish will continue to die unless they reform the spelling and start teaching just one dialect.

Its insanity to try and teach kids 3 different dialects simultaneously + use an defective bastardised spelling system (due to the botched transliteration to Latin in the 1960's)

Make Irish easier to learn and kids will learn it. Take the example of Welsh - which is written phonetically - and people actually learn, and use it.

Spelling?! The spelling has been reformed. That's a complete red herring.

Irish continues to suffer because its future is held by a ruling class who don't give a damn about it. Remember these are the people who put a motorway through Tara and spend a measly €1.5 million per annum on the National Archives. Philistines the lot of them!
 


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