Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish

Should Irish be compulsory in schools?

  • Yes

    Votes: 459 54.9%
  • No

    Votes: 377 45.1%

  • Total voters
    836
  • Poll closed .

mroche4

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Jul 13, 2009
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Having just completed the LC and Ordinary Irish the course needs to be changed. The Higher is too difficult and the lower is too easy. There should be more attention on the learrning of the language then learning terrible stories and books such as PEG and An Trial. What a load of crap! After 6 years of french and 14 years of irish i know alot more French then irish and to me thats the failure of the education system, not me.
 


DJP

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Unfortunately, learning literature is quite a good method of acquiring a language.
There should be two subjects as Dan mentioned, but for the Leaving Cert. Students should perhaps still learn literature etc. up until Junior Cert. I think.
 

scatty

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Jun 6, 2009
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Virtually everyone is in favour of Irish being taught up until Junior Cert. The argument has been for Leaving Cert.
I'm in favour of it being taught, but as I don't think anything should be compulsory, I don't think children should be forced to study it. Home educated children are not forced to study Irish.
 

Riadach

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Having just completed the LC and Ordinary Irish the course needs to be changed. The Higher is too difficult and the lower is too easy. There should be more attention on the learrning of the language then learning terrible stories and books such as PEG and An Trial. What a load of crap! After 6 years of french and 14 years of irish i know alot more French then irish and to me thats the failure of the education system, not me.
An Triail is a fantastic play. Personally, I believe any teacher who teaches Peig should be hauled over hot coals, but can't see why anyone would not like An Triail. It has prostitution, Magdelene laundries, pre-marital sex, illegitimate pregnancies, disowning of children by parents, and a murder-suicide pact. What's not to like?
 

MichaelR

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Beg may air ash
Taw on modra egg toffin
Iz ma lum cawka millish
Coo-ig too guh dee on shoppa innay ogus kee-annig too coopla praw-tee
Vee on green egg tannive
Cod iz anum dit?
Guh rev meela mah agut!!
If you want to do latin phonetic, at least do it properly. It's "ku: pla" or "kuupla", not "coopla". (C as K is not universal, and "oo" as long u is in fact English only).
 

Dasayev

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Jul 7, 2006
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2,811
Beg may air ash
Taw on modra egg toffin
Iz ma lum cawka millish
Coo-ig too guh dee on shoppa innay ogus kee-annig too coopla praw-tee
Vee on green egg tannive
Cod iz anum dit?
Guh rev meela mah agut!!

How long have you been speaking Manx?

;)
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2009
Messages
17
I think that irish should be compulsery at all levels that way we might actually be speaking our language
 

macdarawhitfield

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May 8, 2008
Messages
193
This is what O Cuiv and others say but nothing seems to get done.Honours is tough for most kids because of the archaic stories -which are not helpfulto the moden student.But tis p*ss easy for Gaeltacht and Gaelscoil kids.Irish should be split in 2 and taught as any other language as many posters have said.It's a scandal if your German is better than your Irish after a mere 4 years.Not your fault.However :then/than.Two quite different words.
Who taught you English for 12 years,shoot em!
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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How about we make all the literature and poetry optional as a separate subject.

Then have a compulsory section that just concentrates on sentence formulation, translation, more aural and oral and a little bit of reading comprehesion.

Oh design the oral in a way that you can't regurgitate learnt off nonsense.
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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If you want to do latin phonetic, at least do it properly. It's "ku: pla" or "kuupla", not "coopla". (C as K is not universal, and "oo" as long u is in fact English only).
Oh FFS, I'm not a linguist; whatever works works...

:roll:

Lingo-fascist!
 

macdarawhitfield

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May 8, 2008
Messages
193
I'm in favour of it being taught, but as I don't think anything should be compulsory, I don't think children should be forced to study it. Home educated children are not forced to study Irish.
Trouble is,home schooled kids are not forced to learn anything.I know a couple,very bright ,confident and articulate.Need help crossing the road tho,or writing a letter!
 

USER1234

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Jan 31, 2009
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I think that irish should be compulsery at all levels that way we might actually be speaking our language
If you think we are ever going to use irish as our first language again, you are living in cloud cuckoo land, english is now & will remain our first language!!!
 

YoungLiberal

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They should split it for Leaving Cert into two subjects, one with a focus on speaking and writing it. The other as a literature course. And get rid of the 10% marks bonus. We don't cover English grammar for the Leaving Cert it is assumed but we need to do it for Irish as we don't speak it every day.
I'm not sure if you're actually ignorant on this matter or being deliberately obtuse. But this is the reality.

"Bonus marks at the rate of 10 per cent of the marks obtained will be given to a candidate who obtains less than 75 per cent of the total marks in the case of the following subjects:- Latin, Greek, Classical Studies, Hebrew Studies, History, Geography, Physics, Chemistry, Physics and Chemistry, Biology, Science, Business, Economics, Economic History, Agricultural Science, Agricultural Economics, Home Economics, Music, Business Studies, History and Appreciation of Art, Civic, Social and Political Education, Religious Education, Arabic, LCVP Link Modules - written component only."

So, good students, those who get over 75 (B2), get nothing.

Other students get 10 per cent of their marks, so those who get 65 say, get an extra 6.5 per cent. This is only for the written component, so for the likes of woodwork, art, home ec etc is basically an extra 2 or 3 per cent. Hardly overcompensation for the difficulty in finding materials through Irish/travelling a long distance to find an Irish secondary school?
 

Podolski1.5

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I am in favour of Irish remaining a compulsory subject but in common with many other posters I believe the method of teaching it is totally wrong and should focus firstly on the spoken language rather than grammar, secondly poetry should be dropped entirely from the syllabuses / syllabi. Finally there should be no question of using complicated texts or outdated texts such as Peig. People should be fluent in the language by the time they leave primary school if it was being taught properly.

I believe that the Irish language is too important a part of our culture to be just abandoned.
 

YoungLiberal

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An Triail is a fantastic play. Personally, I believe any teacher who teaches Peig should be hauled over hot coals, but can't see why anyone would not like An Triail. It has prostitution, Magdelene laundries, pre-marital sex, illegitimate pregnancies, disowning of children by parents, and a murder-suicide pact. What's not to like?
As someone who did the leaving relatively recently, the vast majority of my friends speak fondly of an Triail. Some great humour in it.
 

seabhcan

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Sep 3, 2007
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I am in favour of Irish remaining a compulsory subject but in common with many other posters I believe the method of teaching it is totally wrong and should focus firstly on the spoken language rather than grammar, secondly poetry should be dropped entirely from the syllabuses / syllabi. Finally there should be no question of using complicated texts or outdated texts such as Peig. People should be fluent in the language by the time they leave primary school if it was being taught properly.

I believe that the Irish language is too important a part of our culture to be just abandoned.
Personnally, I think the only way to save Irish is to make it optional. The shock to the system which would result would force a change in the way it is taught.
 

USER1234

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People should be fluent in the language by the time they leave primary school if it was being taught properly.
Even if they do become fluent by the time they leave primary school (which i doubt very much) they will forget it all again out of inuse in there normal every day lifes, seem like a bit of a waste of time, money & man hours instead of using it on sometime pratical they will use!!!!
 

uriah

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Apr 18, 2009
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The bigger news in that article is that some Educational Psychologists are clearly making false claims about children having learning disabilities. If they are incapable of learning Irish then they should be incapable of learning another language.
The child is given an exemption from studying Gaeilge because s/he has learning difficulties.
It is not that they are incapable of learning Gaeilge, it is that they have to work so hard (and spend so much time) to become literate in English that the extra burden of a second language is removed, which I think is simply humane.

If a child has difficulty with English literacy, almost every other subject will present added difficulty for the child. Almost all subjects involve reading and writing. Even if the child is good at maths, reading the questions / problems from textbook/exam paper will pose huge problems.

In my experience the child with the exemption from Gaeilge will continue to participate in all oral Irish lessons and learn the songs, poetry, stories in the language.They will not be expected to write essays / read difficult text or sit exams in Gaeilge.
 

USER1234

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Personnally, I think the only way to save Irish is to make it optional. The shock to the system which would result would force a change in the way it is taught.
I agree because then only those who want to learn it will attend the classes, which means there will be less time wasted
 

Riadach

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The child is given an exemption from studying Gaeilge because s/he has learning difficulties.
It is not that they are incapable of learning Gaeilge, it is that they have to work so hard (and spend so much time) to become literate in English that the extra burden of a second language is removed, which I think is simply humane.

If a child has difficulty with English literacy, almost every other subject will present added difficulty for the child. Almost all subjects involve reading and writing. Even if the child is good at maths, reading the questions / problems from textbook/exam paper will pose huge problems.

In my experience the child with the exemption from Gaeilge will continue to participate in all oral Irish lessons and learn the songs, poetry, stories in the language.They will not be expected to write essays / read difficult text or sit exams in Gaeilge.
You're experience is limited. I have known instances where the child's best subject was Irish, yet they were given an exemption. I'm also uncomfortably cogniscent of the fact that many individuals who receive exemptions from Irish due to learning disabilities, have no difficulty presenting for French and German.
 


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