Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish

Should Irish be compulsory in schools?

  • Yes

    Votes: 459 54.9%
  • No

    Votes: 377 45.1%

  • Total voters
    836
  • Poll closed .

controller

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
3,149
Without going through 35 pages of this topic.........I know that there are waiting lists to attend three Gaelscoil, in north Dublin that I know of, hardly a sign that Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish. My two cents
 


YoungLiberal

Well-known member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
2,048
Without going through 35 pages of this topic.........I know that there are waiting lists to attend three Gaelscoil, in north Dublin that I know of, hardly a sign that Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish. My two cents
Yeah, waiting lists full of racists/élitists/peasants*

*I'm not sure what the current stereotype is. Delete as appropriate.
 

Lord Muck Savage

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
1,193
Yeah, waiting lists full of racists/élitists/peasants*

*I'm not sure what the current stereotype is. Delete as appropriate.
'Racists' that really is not such a bad thing, there's hope for the white indigenous population yet.
 

Dunlin3

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Messages
3,174
Can't be arrsed going through the whole threat either but lets be honest here. Many students will have to emigrate and Irish is going to be f*ck all use to them. Looks like some of them want to put the time into something that will help them to get a job abroad.
 

Walkman

Active member
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
141
The system is broken, the answer is not to give up on Irish, we need to fix the system and then we can preserve and renew the language.
For me I see primary schools is where it all goes wrong, a lot of primary teachers do not have sufficient understanding of the language to pass on the basics. By the time students get to secondary level they are frustrated and turn on the language.
 

DuineEile

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
14,658
The system is broken, the answer is not to give up on Irish, we need to fix the system and then we can preserve and renew the language.
For me I see primary schools is where it all goes wrong, a lot of primary teachers do not have sufficient understanding of the language to pass on the basics. By the time students get to secondary level they are frustrated and turn on the language.
+1

You wouldn't accept being taught English by someone who couldn't speak the language.

D
 

Fun with Irish

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 26, 2006
Messages
2,679
I know that there are waiting lists to attend three Gaelscoil, in north Dublin that I know of, hardly a sign that Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish.
Variety in educational provision is something that we like in our country. So Gaelscoileanna are good, just like Educate Together schools are good, and all the others too.

But as to the long term linguistic effect of a Gaelscoil education, note O Riagáin writing in "A New Review of the Irish Language", p59: "...outside the Gaeltacht only one quarter of those who grew up in Irish-language homes use Irish with the same intensity in their current homes."
 

Cato

Moderator
Joined
Aug 21, 2005
Messages
20,400
Variety in educational provision is something that we like in our country. So Gaelscoileanna are good, just like Educate Together schools are good, and all the others too.

But as to the long term linguistic effect of a Gaelscoil education, note O Riagáin writing in "A New Review of the Irish Language", p59: "...outside the Gaeltacht only one quarter of those who grew up in Irish-language homes use Irish with the same intensity in their current homes."
That's a great pity. My next door neighbour is a native speaker of Irish but does not use it at all in his home or with his children. I have never heard him speak in Irish, even to his parents when they are down. (Perhaps they do in private when there are no non-Irish speakers around.)
 

Fun with Irish

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 26, 2006
Messages
2,679
....I'm trying to make the point that Irish offers something in an Irish environment that French does not. That Irish has a relevance and a significence that French to people living in Ireland that French does not, which is the claim that you asked for...
SUPPOSE: a seventeen year old has had Irish classes for twelve years and says to you: I have studied Irish and have assessed its relevance and significance in my life. Now I'd like to study another subject for my Leaving Cert in its place.

What's your reply?
 

Abbeyville

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
33
Pupils in Primary School are introduced to written Irish at too young an age. The emphasis up to third class should be solely on spoken Irish. This will then give a good foundation to the written word. After Junior Certificate Irish should be an option as many students do not have a linguistic aptitude.Ten years of compulsary Irish i.e seven years in Primary and three years in Post Primary should be sufficient.
 

Fun with Irish

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 26, 2006
Messages
2,679
Pupils in Primary School are introduced to written Irish at too young an age. The emphasis up to third class should be solely on spoken Irish. This will then give a good foundation to the written word. .
Who are to act as mentors of the spoken language? The teachers can't because they don't know enough Irish even as a written language. They can't teach a subject that you don't know themselves.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top