Somewheres vs Anywheres

'orebel

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So I'm watching Newsnight and an interesting clip by David Goodhart when my first wife came home from the school bingo night and proceeded to regale me with fascinating tales of who won the best hampers and which kid puked in the corner causing me to miss quite a bit of Goodhart's contentions.
I had caught enough of it to pique my interest - some of it had resonated with me - and so after shooing said first wife away to bed I got on the google machine and found this:

The great British divide | News Review | The Times & The Sunday Times

Anywheres dominate our culture and society. They tend to do well at school and then usually move from home to a residential university in their late teens and on to a career in the professions that might take them to London or even abroad for a year or two.

Such people have portable, “achieved” identities, based on educational and career success, which make them generally comfortable and confident with new places and people.

Somewheres are more rooted and usually have “ascribed” identities — Scottish farmer, working-class Geordie, Cornish housewife — based on group belonging and particular places.
He contends that society is is very roughly divided between Anywheres (25%) -those who dominate our society, culture and politics and Somewheres (50%) those who feel to some extent 'left behind'. The remaining 25% he calls the Inbetweeners.

Rather than badly reproduce what I think is a very well written article I invite you to have a read and give your insights here on 'one of Ireland's leading politics and current affairs discussion websites'

Edit: It's behind a paywall but you can register for free (no credit card details) which will allow access to two articles per week.
 
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Quebecoise

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I think Ireland is a very interesting case in that regard because it has a strong sense of both.

Ireland of course has a very strong sense of 'Somewhere', i.e. local community is very strong; county identity is very strong; everyone has an opinion on the national history; people generally salute strangers in small towns and villages; and their is a strong sense of family and local connection which you wouldn't even experience in Britain.

But also because of the history of emigration there is a strong sense of 'Anywhere'. 'Anywhere' often meant emigrating to 'anywhere but here', and Irish people have strong ties to communities and extended families in other countries. Young Irish people especially have a strong desire to live and work in other countries.

I think that's a big difference between the Irish and say the people of the north of England or the mid-west U.S. and it comes from the disparity of living in a country with a small population while at the same time being speakers of the world's most popular language. I think a lot of young Irish people grow up with the feeling that the world is their oyster and that they have an automatic right to emigrate to other countries.

I think for a lot of Trump and Brexit supporters their countries and economies are big enough to provide them with everything they need and so they see no reason to become 'Anywheres'. But often Irish people did not have that same choice. Historically many had to become 'Anywheres' out of necessity.
 
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I found that the article started off well enough, what with the author pointing out that Brexit and Trump's Election being the two biggest "protest votes" in modern democratic history. On that point, I'd certainly agree with Mr. Goodhart.

He goes on to make a good point about liberal minded people being unwilling to allow a differing point of view about openness, even going as far as to call these opinions xenophobic.

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Old Mr Grouser

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Zapped(CAPITALISMROTS)

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Rots finds himself in the usual location down here on the estate ...going nowhere..:| lol
 

farnaby

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At an Oxford college dinner six years ago I told my neighbour — Gus O’Donnell, then in his last few months as cabinet secretary, the most senior civil servant in the land — that I was writing a book about immigration. He replied: “When I was at the Treasury I argued for the most open door possible to immigration . . . I think it’s my job to maximise global welfare, not national welfare.

I was surprised to hear this and asked the man sitting next to him, Mark Thompson — then director-general of the BBC — whether he believed global welfare should be put before national welfare, if the two should conflict. He defended O’Donnell and said he too believed global welfare was paramount.

Both men’s universalist views are perfectly legitimate and may reflect their moderately devout Catholic upbringings. ...

But is it healthy for democracy when such powerful people hold views that are evidently at odds with the core political intuitions of the majority of the public?
You could debate most of the fundamental questions around political philosophy and political economy on the basis of that quote and question.
 

Sister Mercedes

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We have our own version of Anywheres here. Malta, The Bahamas, Switzerland, Monaco etc etc ... they're registered for tax Anywhere except the place they live.

Even Trump paid $38 million in tax to his home country in a single year.
 

GDPR

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I found that the article started off well enough, what with the author pointing out that Brexit and Trump's Election being the two biggest "protest votes" in modern democratic history. On that point, I'd certainly agree with Mr. Goodhart.

He goes on to make a good point about liberal minded people being unwilling to allow a differing point of view about openness, even going as far as to call these opinions xenophobic.

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That's as far as I got and I'm not willing to subscribe.

He identifies the two groups & the conflict between their respective views, but we already knew that.

As I say I couldn't read further so I don't know how he progressed his article, but it seems to me that the problem or trouble ahead comes not from the fact of there being two completely different views, the problem comes when all the power rests with the "anywheres", as it generally does and despite being a minority they don't seem to have any issue with imposing their view on everyone else, so sure are they that they know what's best & right indeed for everyone.
 

farnaby

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I have read that, how do I get those 10 minutes back?
Surely yummyfellatio's comments on the article were worth the effort?
 

farnaby

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it seems to me that the problem or trouble ahead comes not from the fact of there being two completely different views, the problem comes when all the power rests with the "anywheres", as it generally does and despite being a minority they don't seem to have any issue with imposing their view on everyone else, so sure are they that they know what's best & right indeed for everyone.
Interesting point when you consider the historical interbreeding and aligned interests of European royalty and aristocracy, in contrast to their supposed representation of unique national characteristics to their "somewhere" subjects.

In other words, there are always going to be political elites. The question for democracy now, as it was then, is whether the demos really has the power to replace one with another.
 

'orebel

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I found that the article started off well enough, what with the author pointing out that Brexit and Trump's Election being the two biggest "protest votes" in modern democratic history. On that point, I'd certainly agree with Mr. Goodhart.

He goes on to make a good point about liberal minded people being unwilling to allow a differing point of view about openness, even going as far as to call these opinions xenophobic.

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That's as far as I got and I'm not willing to subscribe.
I am blocked out by the subscription wall so I don't really know what you're talking about.
Anyway my first wife will not allow me to spend the money to read the article.
Apologies. I should have mentioned that you can register for free (no credit card details) which will allow access to two articles per week.
 
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'orebel

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But it's a safe bet that this will become yet another thread about Irish Exceptionalism; "We are fully entitled to live wherever we please but no foreigners should ever be allowed to take up residence here".
It might if it got off the ground but the article isn't solely about immigration.

Mass immigration, not immigration per se, is a problem for Somewheres who see large numbers of unskilled immigrants arriving and not integrating. Anywheres have no problem and push for global welfare over national welfare. Anywheres have much more influence.

Other issues include:

The rise of the 2 working parent families which are prioritised over traditional domesticity favoured by Somewheres. Again, Anywhere headstrong liberalism wins out

The huge increase in university education to the detriment of technical and vocational education. Again affects Somewheres hugely, Anywheres, not so much.

It's worth a gander.
 

GDPR

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Nihilistic rootless cosmopolitans have always existed but I cannot think of a time in history when they have been so numerous as they are today within what was once the Nordic-Latin cultural sphere. The thing is that now they reached such critical mass in terms of numbers, power and influence we are most likely if that is the West can survive the critical period we have now entered to see a sudden switch away from the materialist-sensate values that currently dominate back to Spiritual-Ideantional ones just as happened within the Roman Empire during the fourth century of our era.
 

gatsbygirl20

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It might if it got off the ground but the article isn't solely about immigration.

Mass immigration, not immigration per se, is a problem for Somewheres who see large numbers of unskilled immigrants arriving and not integrating. Anywheres have no problem and push for global welfare over national welfare. Anywheres have much more influence.

Other issues include:

The rise of the 2 working parent families which are prioritised over traditional domesticity favoured by Somewheres. Again, Anywhere headstrong liberalism wins out

The huge increase in university education to the detriment of technical and vocational education. Again affects Somewheres hugely, Anywheres, not so much.

It's worth a gander.
Going by your summary alone, it looks like the same old stuff repackaged, except that he has thought up a cute new name for the dreaded "liberal elites" ("anywheres") and an equally catchy one for "the ordinary people" or "the rust belt voters" whom he calls "somewheres"
 


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