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Soundings is back in print - will you buy it?


He3

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Forty years or so ago Gus Martin compiled an anthology of poetry for use in second level schools. It was removed from the curriculum in 2000. By popular demand, say the publishers, it is being reprinted and is in the shops again in the morning.

As someone who who greatly enjoyed most of the poems in it, I'll be there tomorrow waving a credit card.

Will you buy it?


Legendary Soundings poetry book back by popular demand
 
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He3

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Thomas Kinsella's Another September

Dreams fled away, this country bedroom, raw
With the touch of the dawn, wrapped in a minor peace,
Hears through an open window the garden draw
Long pitch black breaths, lay bare its apple trees,
Ripe pear trees, brambles, windfall-sweetened soil,
Exhale rough sweetness against the starry slates.
Nearer the river sleeps St. John's, all toil
Locked fast inside a dream with iron gates.

Domestic Autumn, like an animal
Long used to handling by those countrymen,
Rubs her kind hide against the bedroom wall
Sensing a fragrant child come back again
- Not this half-tolerated consciousness
That plants its grammar in her yielding weather
But that unspeaking daughter, growing less
Familiar where we fell asleep together.

Wakeful moth wings blunder near a chair,
Toss their light shell at the glass, and go
To inhabit the living starlight. Stranded hair
Stirs on still linen. It is as though
The black breathing that billows her sleep, her name,
Drugged under judgement, waned and - bearing daggers
And balances--down the lampless darkness they came,
Moving like women : Justice, Truth, such figures.

http://www.politics.ie/culture-community/55442-thomas-kinsella.html
 

flavirostris

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definitely. That was a fantastic collection of poetry. Can't believe it was taken off the curriculum
 

borntorum

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I was just thinking a few days ago how I'd love to find my old copy of Soundings. Very happy to hear it's back in print
 

Cassandra Syndrome

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Did anyone ever use a felt marker to transfrom the letter P-E-I-G into B-A-G?

If I ever get my hands on a Tardis........
 

Rocket Man

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Buy it ....... well I might but only to initiate a public buring.
That thing caused me countless hours of misery!
 

jmcc

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That Peig crap was responsible for generations of people hating Irish. That scumbag DeValera and his ilk really tried hard to destroy the language with that servile muck. As for buying 'Soundings' - no!

Regards...jmcc
 

He3

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Podolski1.5

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I might just buy it for the sake of nostalgia. I did my Leaving Cert in 1981 and one of the things I noted about Soundings at the time is that the only poet whose work appeared in the book and who was still alive at the time was Thomas Kinsella. All the others had died, some of them centuries before. Kinsella is still alive, now in his 80s. The others, predictably, are still dead.

The book itself was ok as a poetry book but the lack of contemporary poetry meant that, just like the literature on the course, we were studying historical English texts, not ones from our own time. What relevance the likes of Geoffrey Chaucer, Shakespeare and the others, with their archaic phraseology and outmoded English, had for us as school leavers of the 1980s it is hard to say. Very little I would suggest.
 

Cassandra Syndrome

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Someone I know (ahem) rubbed out the E.
I would imagine her son that fell off the cliff while collecting heather would have been a suitable candidate today for the Department of Finance or Leinster House.
 

TradCat

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I might buy it for people for Christmas unless it's expensive. If it is I'll have to take a few soundings.
 

jmcc

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What relevance the likes of Geoffrey Chaucer, Shakespeare and the others, with their archaic phraseology and outmoded English, had for us as school leavers of the 1980s it is hard to say. Very little I would suggest.
I suppose it prepared those who became lawyers well. But apart from that it was, for the most part, tedious, whiney rubbish from low brow minds.

Regards...jmcc
 

west'sawake

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Who wrote these lines about whom?

'Men that had seen her drank deep and were silent'

or

'They say that here beauty was music in mouth'

or

'Like a bell that is rung or a wonder told shyly
She was the Sunday in every week'

Thought his poetry oozed the soft Irish rain and landscape. A great poet.
 
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MacCoise2

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I might just buy it for the sake of nostalgia. I did my Leaving Cert in 1981 and one of the things I noted about Soundings at the time is that the only poet whose work appeared in the book and who was still alive at the time was Thomas Kinsella. All the others had died, some of them centuries before. Kinsella is still alive, now in his 80s. The others, predictably, are still dead.

The book itself was ok as a poetry book but the lack of contemporary poetry meant that, just like the literature on the course, we were studying historical English texts, not ones from our own time. What relevance the likes of Geoffrey Chaucer, Shakespeare and the others, with their archaic phraseology and outmoded English, had for us as school leavers of the 1980s it is hard to say. Very little I would suggest.
i suppose they went for good poetry
 

jmcc

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Who wrote these lines about whom?

'Men that had seen her drank deep and were silent'
The power of televison advertising? :) Well I suppose it wasn't "Sally O'Brien and the way she might look at you".

Regards...jmcc
 

rockofcashel

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No.. no, no, no, no, no ....

I hate poetry... I just don't get it.. it's balls is what it is...

And I hate gobsheen teachers trying to explain to young impressionable kids, what THEY think a poet was thinking when he or she wrote something..

How the fupp do they know ?

(i got in trouble for having that argument once with an english teacher)

I was one of only 3 students in my class to get an honour in Honours English for my Inter Cert, but on the very first day of class in Honours for the Leaving, the teacher told us we had to learn 66 poems for the Leaving Cert... I packed my pencil case, said thanks but no thanks, and headed off for Pass English.. where I told the teacher that I'd have a look over the Irish poems, but was going to do nothing when he tried to teach me them fupping sonnets... crapology I say, and still say it

I like "If" by Kipling.. and two poems by Frost (walking in woods on a snowy evening and the road less travelled)

And that's it..

Plus, I hate modern art.. more ballsology .. I like pictures to look like what they are.. not some interpretative bull...

Now, rant over.. there's my lack of culture exposed.. and you can shove Soundings up yer jacksie thank you very much
 

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