Spain and Portugal sanctioned for high deficits - but France is special.

O

Oscurito

Readers may be familiar with the term "L'exception française", that French way of doing things that defies all the rules because France is.....different.

Well, the European Commission certainly seems to be buying it. It has started excessive deficit proceedings against Spain and Portugal because both countries' deficits are in excess of the European Union's 3% limit. Yet, so is France's but France will not be sanctioned.

Jean Claude Juncker's reasoning for the special treatment? It's because "it's France".

Spain, Portugal in violation of EU deficit rules - RTÉ News
 


D

Deleted member 48908

Juncker already has the Germans gunning for him. Could this be an attempt to ally with the French. The last time Luxembourg and France fought the Germans together, the yanks had to come and rescue them.
 

Mr Aphorisms

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The Council of EU finance ministers will decide on theCommission's recommendation at their regular meeting on 12 July, a spokeswoman for the EU's Slovak presidency said.

Ministers could reject the Commission's assessment only with a qualified majority of its members.


Hollande: 'Make sure that fella whose eye was hanging out a year ago does what we say'
Kenny: 'Yes boss'

No doubt, the 'only good boy in the class', Ireland, will be drooling at smashing the Spanish and Portuguese. Sickening the kamikaze Irish electorate voted for the Fiscal Treaty as well.
 

cyberianpan

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Juncker already has the Germans gunning for him. Could this be an attempt to ally with the French. The last time Luxembourg and France fought the Germans together, the yanks had to come and rescue them.
Juncker has been wedded at the hip to Hollande since the get go, and also to the Guallists (they've changed names again)

Juncker has been running interference, in order to damage the nascent candidacy of Emmanuel Macron...as,interestingly have been the Irish establishment

To understand just how Macron has the French Establishment in fear, would take an intricate understanding of French culture, but take it from me, he's done the French equivalent of goosing Prince Philip, and cavorting with QEII. ..in a way that shows she likes it

Kenny is reportedly so alarmed, that he's ordered Macron shot on sight...and The Irish Times for one, are giving it welly in misrepresenting what's going on in France...The Irish Establishment have hit high dudgeon again, as it's obvious that an upstart with courage may slip through on merit

cyp
 
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Catalpast

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France and Germany are the EU

- they can do as they like

We might as well be Rockhall...:?
 

Mr Aphorisms

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France and Germany are the EU

- they can do as they like

We might as well be Rockhall...:?
We had a chance to reject the Fiscal Treaty. We chose not to and no doubt, when we're eventually hit too, we'll be crying about it. Some poster with the Family Guy monkey avatar said on another threat that essentially, we only have ourselves to blame. We vote for all of this, ALL OF IT!
 

tigerben

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It's great to see equality between member states ..........oh wait forgot Germany been leader with France as deputy leader unelected of course they make the rules and the rest fall in to line. Brexit all the way and let's hope more will follow .
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Worth remembering that there was a proposal at European level in the early noughties that no member state should be allowed to borrow above 3% of GDP.

Two countries vetoed that proposal at the time. Germany and France. Because both were regularly above the 3% limit so it didn't suit them.
 

blokesbloke

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Juncker made this very clear before the Brexit referendum.

It was one of many reasons I voted to leave.

The EU is simply unfair and corrupt and completely dominated by France and Germany who can do what the hell they like whilst preaching to other countries about following the rules.

But hey, I'm a narrow-minded xenophobic Little Englander so what do I know?

I should be a good little EU supporter and not be at all xenophobic, and it's not at all unfair or xenophobic that the French think they should be treated special in the EU but their "partners" in Spain and Portugal should be punished for not obeying the rules.

Vive la France, Vive la EU!
 
O

Oscurito

We had a chance to reject the Fiscal Treaty. We chose not to and no doubt, when we're eventually hit too, we'll be crying about it. Some poster with the Family Guy monkey avatar said on another threat that essentially, we only have ourselves to blame. We vote for all of this, ALL OF IT!
The 3% deficit rule was in place long before the Fiscal Treaty.

Anyway, the issue here is that one country is being treated as a special case. There was nothing in the Fiscal Treaty about some countries being regarded as "special snowflakes".
 
O

Oscurito

Juncker made this very clear before the Brexit referendum.

It was one of many reasons I voted to leave.

The EU is simply unfair and corrupt and completely dominated by France and Germany who can do what the hell they like whilst preaching to other countries about following the rules.

But hey, I'm a narrow-minded xenophobic Little Englander so what do I know?

I should be a good little EU supporter and not be at all xenophobic, and it's not at all unfair or xenophobic that the French think they should be treated special in the EU but their "partners" in Spain and Portugal should be punished for not obeying the rules.

Vive la France, Vive la EU!
I agree with some of that. However, I don't think that that (Franco-German domination) in itself was a good enough reason to leave. There are many countries that resent it and the UK could have been a leader, a sort of counterpoint to the Berlin-Paris Axis. The newer accession countries in particular would have been staunch allies.

But the UK has been disengaged from the EU for years, these new potential allies are portrayed in the British media as criminals and spongers and the British government allowed the media hysteria to drive public policy towards these newer EU members.

So potential allies were lost...
 

firefly123

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I agree with some of that. However, I don't think that that (Franco-German domination) in itself was a good enough reason to leave. There are many countries that resent it and the UK could have been a leader, a sort of counterpoint to the Berlin-Paris Axis. The newer accession countries in particular would have been staunch allies.

But the UK has been disengaged from the EU for years, these new potential allies are portrayed in the British media as criminals and spongers and the British government allowed the media hysteria to drive public policy towards these newer EU members.

So potential allies were lost...
Exactly. Britain was poised to be a leader of the counterweight to France and Germany. But decided to take its ball home instead.
 

blokesbloke

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Oh please. We've been trying to reform the EU for 43 years. How long before we can be allowed to give it up as a bad job?

The same people who are saying we should have stayed in and reformed it are the same people who complained about whinging Brits disagreeing with everyone else and said if we didn't like the EU we should leave.

When we do what they suggest we're told we should have stayed.

Worth bearing in mind if we'd been allowed into the EU when we first applied, we would have been there much nearer the start and could have had much more influence in shaping the EU so that we didn't have to join late and then try and reform what was already there.

However the French vetoed us twice - and of course people just say that Brexit proves they were right, so again we cannot win.

It doesn't apply to everyone but a lot of people here simply do not like the Brits and would criticise us whatever we did.

The idea that such people would have welcomed Britain being a leader in the EU against France and Germany is laughable.
 

blokesbloke

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I agree with some of that. However, I don't think that that (Franco-German domination) in itself was a good enough reason to leave. There are many countries that resent it and the UK could have been a leader, a sort of counterpoint to the Berlin-Paris Axis. The newer accession countries in particular would have been staunch allies.

But the UK has been disengaged from the EU for years, these new potential allies are portrayed in the British media as criminals and spongers and the British government allowed the media hysteria to drive public policy towards these newer EU members.

So potential allies were lost...
Britain tried to block Drunk Juncker as EU President - the very same man who is now openly stating France is special but Spain and Portugal will do as he tells them.

Which other EU states supported us then?

No, we were roundly criticised for being difficult as usual and I heard the usual "if you don't like the EU, leave!" which I heard every time the UK as a EU "partner" dared to have a different opinion or suggest reform.

Now we've actually left as suggested, that's not right either. Of course...

The UK was the perfect opposite of France. We were special alright - we objected to the rules, but France simply adopted them in the name of being "good Europeans" and then promptly ignored them - with the blessing of Mr. Juncker.
 

Mr Aphorisms

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The 3% deficit rule was in place long before the Fiscal Treaty.

Anyway, the issue here is that one country is being treated as a special case. There was nothing in the Fiscal Treaty about some countries being regarded as "special snowflakes".
Yes, I know that. And Germany was regularly braking that rule. I had one person say before that it was okay because Germany had taken on East Germany and needed time to fix their books. A joke of an excuse, but one of the many to justify the imbalance of power in the EU.

The point about the Fiscal Treaty was that it was what, 12 pages long? And from what I remember, hardly a tough read. It was all laid out what was being proposed and this was after the EU had acted egregiously regarding the bank bailout. Irish people still voted yes and thus, we support this. It's that simple. Anything else is just 'we need to change' guff to defend the actions of an electorate that will probably elect Fianna Fail again next time around after them narrowly missing out previously.
 

Toland

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The 3% deficit rule was in place long before the Fiscal Treaty.

Anyway, the issue here is that one country is being treated as a special case. There was nothing in the Fiscal Treaty about some countries being regarded as "special snowflakes".
I remember the 3% rule from way back when. Wasn't it one of the thíngs that the Greek State statistical service lied through its teeth about to get into the Euro zone back in the day?

Remember those Greek figures that mysteriously changed to just under the limits just in time, and the rest of Europe whistling loudly (Germany the loudest) as they welcomed Greece into the Eurozone with open arms?
 


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